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krazeeboi

Clemson Architecture Center

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I think the residents of that neighborhood are afraid the character of their neighborhood will be changed for the worse by locating the Architeture Center there. Those fears are reasonable.

If the design lives up to the legacy of excellence that the Spoleto Festival and Clemson Universityy are known for, the building should be a welcome, architecturally-sensitive addition to the neighborhood.

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Being an Achitecture Center, I'm sure Clemson's architecture program knows what they are doing - design and build a structure that fits in with the historic Charleston downtown area. I would find this to be more of an asset. Charleston features many historic structures that can inspire future plans via architecture.

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Something to consider also (at least this is the case in Roanoke): half-informed NIMBYs would fight the Second Coming if they thought it might affect their property values. :lol:

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the design is very unassuming. The folks in Ansonborough are don't won't anything built....they've opposed construction in the city center for "fear" of its impact on their area. If you scream wolf enough, sooner or later nobody listens....and I think the Ansonborough folks are at that point.

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I also think that it is this type of attitude which prevails citywide that just may possibly keep Charleston stuck in time. Historic preservation is a good thing, but it is very possible for modern structures to peacefully co-exist with historic ones. Ever heard of New Orleans?

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Clemson is not exactly known for its urban style, so I could see where people might be concerned. However, they have an outstanding architecture school. I have no doubts that this buliding will fit in very well with the surrounding area.

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Historic preservation is a good thing, but it is very possible for modern structures to peacefully co-exist with historic ones.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Good point.

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Mayor Riley basically wants to extend the "higher learning district" of Charleston further west along George Street, the residents want to preserve the residential character of the street. Who's right? Well, in my opinion, the people of Ansonborough have to live with what's built there, and their wishes should be respected. Moving the School of Architecture to Ansonborough Field won't hurt anyone. In fact, it'll improve the mix of buildings built on the Field. We'll have a hotel, maybe a museum (although I think the African-American Museum would have been a better fit at McLeod Plantation), condos, the Aquarium, and a graduate school. Not a bad group of buildings.

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Interesting article here.

Apparently, a large part of the money being used to build the Clemson School of Architecture may be tainted. $1 Million was given by the foundation of the late Countess Spaulding

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Here's a fantastic editorial in today's P & C by Robert Epps, a Charleston architect about the Clemson Architectural Center. To sum it up, he basically states how the pompous residents of Ansonborough have given misleading facts to give "accurate" reasons to oppose the center. He also gives correct information as to what the Ansonborough neighborhood truly is. One great quote from the editorial is this:

..."Revisionist history" has allowed opponents to portray Ansonborough as a fragile residential neighborhood. As an architect who has had an office in Ansonborough for over 15 years and who once lived in Ansonborough, I believe a more accurate read of Ansonborough's history is that of having always been heavily infused with non-residential buildings and non-residential activity. Charleston High School first existed at 55 Society Street. Commercial, institutional and parochial facilities have always been an integral part of residential neighborhoods in the city, including Ansonborough. First Baptist's gymnasium exists at Anson and Pinckney streets. The Buist Magnet school is located one block from the proposed CAC site, the Montessori school is two blocks and the College of Charleston is three blocks.

Prior to recent use as home for the Charleston Symphony Orchestra and currently Spoleto USA, the Middleton-Pinckney building served as home to probably South Carolina's largest public swimming pool. Some 300 to 400 children seasonally used the facility on a daily basis. Currently, Ansonborough is home to numerous commercial and retail businesses, including restaurants, shops and carriage companies. No residence in Ansonborough is more than two blocks from commercial/retail activity. The incompatibility argument essentially lacks merit. No one would suggest that the Dock Street Theatre is incompatible with the French Quarter...

This editorial provides a convincing argument for building the CAC at its currently planned location. The DT residents, again, like to think they are just an isolated, suburban neighborhood where no one should build anything new. Krazeeboi made a great point earlier in this thread...excessive preservation can hurt a city, even one that relies on many historic structures. If the residents don't want these type of things built where they live, they need to move to a suburb.

Opponents of Clemson Architectural Center use revisionist history

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Originally there were three entries in a competition to plan the CAC. There was also a website where you could look at each competitor's entry...it included floorplans, brief presentation synopsis, and an artist's rendering from many different angles. :unsure: Dadgummit, I can't remember where to go on the web for it!

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The latest on Clemson Architecture Center is that it will be built on an 80 acre tract in North Charleston in conjuction with the Hunley Museum.

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The latest on Clemson Architecture Center is that it will be built on an 80 acre tract in North Charleston in conjuction with the Hunley Museum.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

:angry: Aw, man! Can people in my hometown ever get a clue? Where did you get this information, Spartan? That's news to me. I'm telling you guys, the north city just takes everything new and modern away, and Charleston WILL end up becoming a big urban museum if they keep this up.

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:angry: Aw, man! Can people in my hometown ever get a clue? Where did you get this information, Spartan? That's news to me.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I know a guy :whistling: (But geing a student at Clemson helps too)

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It was in the paper today- apparantly its 65 acres, not 80.

It would ultimately create 5,000 jobs and a $287million payroll. That is a pretty huge impact on Charleston... well, North Charleston. <_< But good news over all I'd say.

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It was in the paper today- apparantly its 65 acres, not 80.

It would ultimately create 5,000 jobs and a $287million payroll. That is a pretty huge impact on Charleston...But good news over all I'd say.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Well, it is good news for Charleston. ;) However, I did not see anything in the P & C about this. I guess it might go to print tomorrow, but do you have the link for the place where you read it? Is it online?

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I've tried to find it... It was in the Greenville News's Pickens County Weekly Sampler thing that I get for some reason. But it turns out that info was also incorrect. Thats the Greenville News for you I guess.....

It is, in fact 82 acres in N Chas. Here is the real info from Clemson, which I actually trust to be correct.

Here is the link: http://clemsonews.clemson.edu/WWW_releases...091605main.html

That link provides alot of info about what Clemson is going around the state and all of htis money they they were recently awarded.

Some edited excerpts:

North Charleston City Council gave Clemson 82 acres of land for its new Restoration Research Campus.

The review board awarded Clemson $10.3 million in matching state funds to enhance the university

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