Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Allan

Beyond The Suburbs

Recommended Posts


Just promise me you won't post this in the general UrbanPlanet board.  I'm really embarrassed to be from Michigan right now <_<

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

This same thing is going on in almost every major urban area in the United States and is hardly unique to Detroit. Look at Atlanta, Los Angeles, New York, or Chicago for example. Suburban (or exurban) sprawl is going to continue until the market is saturated and no-one wants to live out in the BFEs anymore. The Detroit area is somewhat unique however, because the overall population has not increased dramatically and the sprawl has continued outwards. I can see the market becoming saturated fairly soon with gas prices bound to increase even further, and the quality of many of these houses is very sub-par. You get what you pay for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Though this is going on in most large metropolitan areas, I think the difference is that people in Chicago or Atlanta look forward to going into the city. They frequent the downtown and even neighborhood attractions on a regular basis. I really think the city of Detroit has these things to offer, but I'm not sure people from the outlying areas know about them. No offense to those that live in the suburbs, but it seems that some of the residents-especially those in the immediate east suburbs live in a bubble of denial. I mean, I live in Lansing and I drive to Detroit at least 3 times/week...though partly for business, I make sure to invest in the city to ensure that things will continue on a stronger path.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Believe me statedude3, there are people in Atlanta, Chicago, New York, etc. that wouldn't step foot in the city itself. My friend's uncle lives in suburban Chicago and claims that he'll get shot if he goes to the city.

Regardless of statistics, Detroit is and always will be the center of the region. The majority of the regions draws are in Detroit.

One think I've definitely realized is a change in attitude towards Detroit. When I say I'm from Detroit, people don't look at me with blank stares anymore. Not too long ago, I went to UM for a presentation for their graduates school; and, when I told one of the guys I was from Detroit, he actually asked me whereabouts. He seemed genuinely interested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We might also want to remember that Detroit does not need EVERYONE from the suburbs. There's about 5 million people in the region. If just a third or even a quarter of those people start feeling more connected to Detroit, then the city will be well on its way.

The people in South Lyon and Milford...let them stay there. We're not gonna get everyone, and we don't need to

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This same thing is going on in almost every major urban area in the United States and is hardly unique to Detroit. Look at Atlanta, Los Angeles, New York, or Chicago for example. Suburban (or exurban) sprawl is going to continue until the market is saturated and no-one wants to live out in the BFEs anymore.  The Detroit area is somewhat unique however, because the overall population has not increased dramatically and the sprawl has continued outwards.  I can see the market becoming saturated fairly soon with gas prices bound to increase even further, and the quality of many of these houses is very sub-par.  You get what you pay for.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I guess my problem with the article is that it seems to "celebrate" the whole phenomenom (sp?) And the people in the article act like they have found some paradise, but then turn around and complain because others build out in the hinterlands, too. LOL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess my previous post was a bit ignorant of the problems that exist in other metro cities. I have made a decision to move into the city...despite the oposite trend, and despite all that the city has to improve. I work with families of the city's poorest communities on a daily basis and I can tell you that they are every bit as pleasant, if not more so than many people I know from the suburbs. I really dont think 20,000 abandoned buildings is the only reason people are not coming back to the city. I really wish the exact reason for such flight could be pinpointed. I mean, am I crazy for moving into the city? Did I not get the memo that everyone is going out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was a really interesting article. I talked to my dad yesterday and he told me that when I was younger we had considered moving to Green Oak. I'm glad we didn't, living out in the country would be way too boring. Hanging out with the teens around town at the gas station like they do in Hartland Township would just be way too exciting (not).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.