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The Grand River?! You mean GR has a River?

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Wouldn't it be a problem for boaters launching their boats if there are artificial rapids right off the launch?

Yeah, probably for that launch. But the document shows there are quite a few boat launches below the dam going all the way out to Johnson Park, and quite a few spots for potential launches.

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I think this would be a big draw for downtown. Not only Kayakers, but also spectators. As GRDad said, I was lead to believe this would cost tens of millions, not $2.25 million. If it looked anything like the river in Colorado, it would add quite a lot of "natural" beauty to to the river too.

Joe

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In addition, I got this Facebook Message from Grand Rapids Whitewater:

Check out our web site, we just went dot org! See the important new content. The Saginaw area is actually getting rapids right now. Is Grand Rapids next?

Did you know that the decision for the location of the 2016 Summer Olympics is only 19 days away? Were you aware that Chicago is a candidate City? Here's something that you need to know; Mayor Heartwell has been in serious negotiation to bring the whitewater kayaking venue to GR in the event that the Windy City does prevail. Imagine the Olympics in Grand Rapids. Imagine rapids in the Grand!

Please help. Get involved by inviting your Facebook friends to join this group. It's easy and effective. Please do it now.

The Olympics? Grand Rapids? Rapids. Grand Rapids?

Become a Facebook fan: Grand Rapids White Water Facebook page

Joe

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Green Gathering: Call to Action

Wednesday, October 21st, 6:30pm - 8:30pm, Creston High

-What we have done so far; Overview of the Green Grand Rapids process, where we are/how we got here

-Where we are going from here; What's next!

-How can you get involved; meet partners/champion groups, find out how you can help!

Green Grand Rapids Partner/Champion organizations will be joining us at Green Gathering: Call to Action to introduce their group and tell us about what they are doing and how YOU can help!

-Friends of GR Parks

-WMEAC

-WMMBA

-Fulton Street Farmers Market

-Grand River groups including GRWW

-GGRBC

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Cities with large bodies of water seem to thrive much more than cities that are totally landlocked. Grand Haven, East GR, Lowell: These places seem to rally around the river or lake that they are built next to. I was recently in Grand Haven for the first time and I was astonished by the energy and beauty of their downtown. Yes, Lake Michigan has a lot to do with it, but it doesn't take just a huge body of water to create the same effect. East GR�s Reeds Lake is a wonderful small body of water that serves as a beacon for the whole city. People sail, swim, walk around the lake all day. The whole city feeds off of that. Lowell, on a smaller scale, is the same way.

So you would think that a city like Grand Rapids would similarly get the same energy from the river that we take part of our name from, and is built next to? Sadly, we have turned our backs on the Grand River. Our river for the most part, is almost abandoned. We have no sailboats, pleasure craft or commercial traffic, only a few fisherman in small boats. We have fake rapids made of concrete and we criss-crossed the river with too many bridges. On far too many days, we are told to have no contact with it because the river�s sewer tributaries have made the grand too toxic to touch. The river�s �shores� are massive concrete walls in some places, and in the downtown area we have a horrible bug problem that makes it a pain to sit next to the water. And for some reason, in some places, the river seems to be barely three feet deep! This cannot be the same powerful river that the early settlers floated massive logs down from the north country or the same river that handled riverboats traveling all the way from the lakeshore. What on earth happened? Is it too far gone to recover the rivers original, natural character or our we just stuck with a less-than-grand river for good? We have a resource that is just as good as Lake Michigan and Reeds lake. It would do worlds of good if we feed off the energy of the river and not just use it as a drainage ditch or postcard backdrop. We need to reintegrate it back into the city.

But maybe I'm totally off. :lol: I've been known for being that.

I agree completely, it is sad that the river seems so abandoned. In Columbus, OH they have two large polluted rivers that run through the city and downtown. Rather than ignore them, people build restaurant patios overlooking them, walking trails, parks, they make money from the rivers, and I enjoy getting to see the water! I don't need to swim in it. The only place downtown with a river view is Grand Plaza Benthams' (that I know of), which is always nice, but really? That's it? We need to get creative

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Mixology at the JW has a nice view of the river as well. Not to mention the Van Andel Museum and Grand Gallery of Devos Place. Most recent developments along the river have taken advantage of it well, there's just a lot of undeveloped land along the river still.

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I agree completely, it is sad that the river seems so abandoned. In Columbus, OH they have two large polluted rivers that run through the city and downtown. Rather than ignore them, people build restaurant patios overlooking them, walking trails, parks, they make money from the rivers, and I enjoy getting to see the water! I don't need to swim in it. The only place downtown with a river view is Grand Plaza Benthams' (that I know of), which is always nice, but really? That's it? We need to get creative

I agree with Slater... it's not completely ignored. Mixology has great plush seating out there, with heaters, overlooking the river. It's nice.

I would say I've taken more unintentional pictures of the river from within the VA Museum than anywhere else.

That said, there's clearly tons of potential... we haven't even begun to tap it yet.

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I'm starting to think that removing the dam in any portion may not be a good idea. When the Asian Carp start to make their way up the Grand the option of closing off the fish ladder could be a wise idea to save the rest of the river.

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I'm starting to think that removing the dam in any portion may not be a good idea. When the Asian Carp start to make their way up the Grand the option of closing off the fish ladder could be a wise idea to save the rest of the river.

According to my quick internet research Asian carp can jump around 8-10 feet so I'm not really sure the dam would slow them down too much.

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I'm starting to think that removing the dam in any portion may not be a good idea. When the Asian Carp start to make their way up the Grand the option of closing off the fish ladder could be a wise idea to save the rest of the river.

But Asian carp can jump up to 8-10 feet out of the water. Are we going to make the dam higher?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_carp

Silver carp have become very notorious for being easily frightened by boats and personal watercraft, which causes them to leap high into the air. The fish can jump 8–10 feet (2.5–3 m) into the air, and numerous boaters have been injured by collisions with the fish.[3] According to the EPA, "reported injuries include cuts from fins, black eyes, broken bones, back injuries, and concussions".[4]

I guess we'd have to hope they only jump that high when they are scared and not when they are trying to get over a dam.

Edited by fotoman311

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Is anyone else reading the excellent series of stories in the Press about the Grand River Expedition 2010? Howard Meyerson and team is doing a great job of bringing the reader along with them as they canoe and kayak from the headwaters of the Grand to Lake Michigan.

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Is anyone else reading the excellent series of stories in the Press about the Grand River Expedition 2010? Howard Meyerson and team is doing a great job of bringing the reader along with them as they canoe and kayak from the headwaters of the Grand to Lake Michigan.

Yes, I have. They're awesome. They'll be floating through my old hometown of Dimondale in a day or so.

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I was watching Olympic kayaking today and it made me think of this topic so I thought I'd bump it.

The Grand River Restoration Executive Summary was released early this month, and the current price tag estimate is $27.5 Million. It's a quick read.

The accompanying MLive post had some good comments - the usual D-bags were there too, but the GRWW people were also present and fielding questions.

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(I didn't read the report)... but I wonder how long it would take to do the environmental impact study and all the other approvals? Would it take as long to accomplish as the Traverse City Boardman Dam removal?

From Mlive:

"The report includes a timeline to complete the final design in mid-2013. Construction would begin in mid-2014 and conclude in late 2016."

Edited by fotoman311

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Thanks. I finally had time to (and something other than a tablet computer) to read the report on. In the sections on 'constraints', FTC&H describe a few points that may parallel the Boardman Dam project and introduce unknown delays - mostly dealing with governmental approvals. The US Fish and Wildlife Service approvals and environmental impact study were something that the Boardman project ran into as well, and those might add an indeterminate amount of time.

I'd love to see the river developed into a place where you can do more than fish, I do wonder about the many layers of governmental approvals that might delay this thing, and lessen the stakeholders excitment and interest levels.

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