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Michigan Central Station PART II of IV


wolverine

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Welcome to Part II of the tour of MCS. I'll continue to show you the lower floors of the station. We'll get to the tower section late in Part III and all of Part IV. If you haven't seen Part I, click on the link below

PART I

Part II - You are here

Part III

Part IV

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Mezzanine hallway looking downtown into the rampway

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Rampway, area, place.

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The stations trademark windows. A shame many of them have been removed.

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Another long hall.

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Yep.

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Not sure quite what this once was.

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The wood floors in this room are still in tact

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Another trademark of MCS is the alignment of doors leading from room to room. The station offices had to be efficient, but offered very little privacy to workers.

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Looking up out of one of the office windows at the tower. The concourse area is to the right.

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Every window is broken. It's unbelievable how destructive some people can be.

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Concourse.

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Light shines in this room that has been seriously water damaged.

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Another dark hall.

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The railings are gone. I have a feeling they were used for firewood.

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Exhaust pipe?

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Doorway

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Columns near the ticket counter.

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Ticket Counter

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Ticket office.

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This vaulted hallway was still in tact. There were many siderooms off to the side, which I believe were stores at one time.

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You knew this part was coming. :)

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Sorry some of the pics were a bit blurry. It's a reason why I need to return with my new camera and correct them.

COMING SOON, PART III

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The more I see pictures the more discusted I am at the people that terrorize the building. But I still am struck by it's beauty...even after 20 years of destruction. Hopefully someone will step forward and make a proposal that we can all agree upon.

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I recently found out you can walk above the domes in that vaulted area. It would be cool to get pictures through holes looking into the room where the chandeleirs once hung

EDIT: You'll be more upset in tours 3 and 4, statedude. All of the marble paneling in the tower was destroyed or scavenged about 2 to 3 years ago. This probably would have been avoided if the building was secured properly years ago. Keep in mind, that the fence around the station wasn't there in the past.

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Just a warning though. I really don't want these pictures to encourage urban exploration. The reason the fence is up is because the building is very dangerous Although, I went into this building with good intentions to document it before it decays further into ruin, it is still off limits.

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Just a warning though.  I really don't want these pictures to encourage urban exploration.  The reason the fence is up is because the building is very dangerous  Although, I went into this building with good intentions to document it before it decays further into ruin, it is still off limits.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Well, if it's off limits...how'd you get permission to go in there?

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Awesome pics and tour. It must've been a bit uncomfortable standing there, in the concourse, imagining all the activity and people from long ago when the MCS was bustling with commerce. Some of the architecture, looks, chillingly, like something out of the ancient Roman Empire.

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^ Yes, but we have no info on the results. An engineering study was recently completed as well, that covered the feasibility of demolishing the station. It was found that demolition would be impossible with the city's lack of resources, and the fact that the station's structural durability is too strong for a modern implosive demolition.

I will try to return to the station today to hopefully get some better pics.

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^ Yes, but we have no info on the results.  An engineering study was recently completed as well, that covered the feasibility of demolishing the station.  It was found that demolition would be impossible with the city's lack of resources, and the fact that the station's structural durability is too strong for a modern implosive demolition.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

So in other words the building is so strong that the city that has neglected it for so long has shot itself in the foot. That is a testament to the building, and to time. I would ALMOST like to see it sit for 15 more years to remind the city what happens when they let good things go to waste.

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I would venture to say that it has to be in the $500 MIL+ range. There is no way the city could do the renovation. It has to be a private developer. It could be the premiere residential renovation in Midwest history, if not the Country, if done properly.

Get David Johnson of Victor International on it. He put together Bay Harbor in Petoskey with CMS Energy for $100's of millions.

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