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blockbuster

Dallas vs. Minneapolis

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hey guys im new here and i want to know which city(dallas or minneapolis) has a bigger CBD. Can someone please enlighten me!!!? Oh and btw im from Dallas :D.

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well thats cause many people live in the suburbs of dallas...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That's one of the dumbest statements I've read being every major city in the country has people living in the suburbs.

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Blockbuster. You are misunderstanding what he is saying. He is saying that more people live in the nieghborhoods just outside downtown Dallas then in downtown Dallas. Dallas does not have a large downtown population. But it does have a large uptown population. Both areas are growing though.

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Dallas has a much more extensive light rail network than Minneapolis which may be one of the reasons that close in neighborhoods are more populated there vs the downtown. Dallas did a lot of growing in the 70s and 80s when design for public space was probably at its worst.

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Obvioulsy Dallas has a much more extensive light rail system being the city's first line started in 1996 whereas the system in Minneapolis started in June of 2004.

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I would assume, given the numbers, that Dallas probably has a much higher vacancy rate for office space downtown?

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You're right. Dallas has a vacancy rate of 27.5% (March 31, 2005).

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You're right.  Dallas has a vacancy rate of 27.5% (March 31, 2005).

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

27.5%???? Wow... maybe the low vacancies of Hampton Roads have left me jaded, but that seems rather high...

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Dallas has a much more extensive light rail network than Minneapolis which may be one of the reasons that close in neighborhoods are more populated there vs the downtown.  Dallas did a lot of growing in the 70s and 80s when design for public space was probably at its worst.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Though it got to light rail late, Minneapolis has many intact older neighborhoods that surround downtown. I would say moreso than Dallas. Rail service may have been a factor in the development of Dallas' close-in neighborhoods, but it wasn't in Minneapolis for the most part. Perhaps because Minneapolis always had excellent public transportation. Most of those neighborhoods in Minneapolis have just been there since they were built--100 yr. ago or so. Most importantly they escaped urban renewal.

Low quality Cedar-Riverside pic, about 2 miles from Minneapolis' CBD:

original.jpg

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Dallas seems to go on and on for miles and miles -- so it is hard to compare the actual cities. If Minneapolis has less commercial/office space is it simply because the physical boundries of the city are smaller? It really is hard to compare the two. My impression with Dallas is that it is a much more suburban-focused lifestyle.

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Though it got to light rail late, Minneapolis has many intact older neighborhoods that surround downtown.  I would say moreso than Dallas.  Rail service may have been a factor in the development of Dallas' close-in neighborhoods, but it wasn't in Minneapolis for the most part.  Perhaps because Minneapolis always had excellent public transportation.  Most of those neighborhoods in Minneapolis have just been there since they were built--100 yr. ago or so.  Most importantly they escaped urban renewal.

Low quality Cedar-Riverside pic, about 2 miles from Minneapolis' CBD:

original.jpg

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Fairly random statement, but this picture reminds me of the town I lived in when I lived in Germany... I think that's why I have such an affinity for cities now, particularly the ones that are dense and walkable.

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27.5%????  Wow... maybe the low vacancies of Hampton Roads have left me jaded, but that seems rather high...

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That number will drop significantly once many of the office buildings are converted to residential. In fact they have many NOW that are being converted to residential but they wont report them until they are actually finished converting and have people actually moving in. The biggest projects are a year away which will really drop the vacancy rate.

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Funny enough, when I was in Minneapolis 4 or 5 years ago, I met someone from Dallas who was now (at the time) living in Minneapolis. I had just spent some time walking around downtown Minneapolis right before I met him. He asked me what I thought of it, and I said it was alright, but that there weren't many people walking around. He was surprised at my statement, because to him it seemed like downtown Minneapolis had tons of people walking around compared to Dallas, whose downtown he described as "dead". Don't shoot the messenger, I'm just saying what he told me, and he was born and raised in Dallas. And keep in mind these was nearly 5 years ago, so things could have changed a bunch in that time.

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Dallas has a kind of deadish downtown compared to most major cities. Part of this is because of the dual relationship with Ft Worth the city has but also because of the majority of its Fortune 500 cos being based in suburbs - J.C. Penney and Frito-Lay in Plano, Texas Instruments in Richardson, lots of cos are based in Farmer's Branch, Plano, and Richardson. Dallas is just admittedly more sprawled out than most major metro areas. Overall, it has a much bigger feel and I'd wager Minneapolis-St Paul doesn't approach the 5.5 million in the DFW metro.

Being "dead" at night and on weekends is parly because most of the entertainment districts - Deep Ellum, Lower Greenville, Uptown, Knox-Henderson, etc while having character and being older are technically outside the CBD (only Deep Ellum) is even close while West End is the only true downtown entertainment district and it is perceived as a "cheesy" tourist spot.

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Dallas has a kind of deadish downtown compared to most major cities.  Part of this is because of the dual relationship with Ft Worth the city has but also because of the majority of its Fortune 500 cos being based in suburbs - J.C. Penney  and Frito-Lay in Plano, Texas Instruments in Richardson, lots of cos are based in Farmer's Branch, Plano, and Richardson.  Dallas is just admittedly more sprawled out than most major metro areas.  Overall, it has a much bigger feel and I'd wager Minneapolis-St Paul doesn't approach the 5.5 million in the DFW metro.

Being "dead" at night and on weekends is parly because most of the entertainment districts - Deep Ellum, Lower Greenville, Uptown, Knox-Henderson, etc while having character and being older are technically outside the CBD (only Deep Ellum) is even close while West End is the only true downtown entertainment district and it is perceived as a "cheesy" tourist spot.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

With some exceptions (correct me if I'm wrong), Dallas seems to be much more of a 9-5 city with fewer residents in a larger downtown. Dallas has a gorgeous and interesting skyline, but I don't think it's worth being called the hub of activity in the metro. Dallas isn't as pedestrian-friendly as some cities, which contributes to the problem.

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