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On 11/24/2018 at 12:38 AM, Antrell Williams said:

Depending on who you ask.
Yes, it does. Which is why I question giving them tax dollars while our infrastructure crumbles.

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It's rare that states give direct incentives to companies, but it does happen.   I'm not okay with that beyond utilizing the state's training program, which is actually very good. 

But I am all for tax breaks to targeted industries.   That's not a cash payment.   It's voluntarily not collecting taxes on a new private investment vs not collecting taxes on anything (because it doesn't exist).    Either way, the state/parish won't see direct tax revenue for it.    It's an appropriate stopgap until the state reforms it's horrible tax code, which is something our neighbors to the east (Mississippi) is starting to consider doing.    

On 3/29/2020 at 1:06 AM, richyb83 said:

Here are some pics of the nearly empty Interstates & Streets around BR

https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_rouge/multimedia/photos/collection_bf0d302a-6e38-11ea-a00a-83ff31f668af.html#4

 

image.png.861a7b18c63b01e3c41bcf8163c47723.pngimage.png.861a7b18c63b01e3c41bcf8163c47723.pngimage.png.861a7b18c63b01e3c41bcf8163c47723.pngimage.png.861a7b18c63b01e3c41bcf8163c47723.png

The commuter trains where I live now are EMPTY.   I'm honestly not sure if they'll survive this.    Between the Covid-related economic sanctions and the latest push to defund law enforcement, we could be on the verge of another lost decade for America's largest cities.     

My employer insists that more of us can work remotely for a larger percentage of time even after Covid.   If that's true, maybe it's time to move out of the city.  

Edited by cajun
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Yeah...SAD! TOTAL crap! If they ever do catch this chump they need to stick him in a crawfish boiler!   Here is a new website....The City Key lets you visually display Baton Rouge resources and stat

Amazon applies for permit to open Baton Rouge distribution center                                                     https://www.businessreport.com/article/amazon-applies-permit-open-baton-rouge-dist

Scott: Next two years poised to be among brightest in B.R. history   The Baton Rouge metro area's economic outlook for the next two years is one of the brightest economist Loren Scott can remember o

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13 hours ago, cajun said:

It's rare that states give direct incentives to companies, but it does happen.   I'm not okay with that beyond utilizing the state's training program, which is actually very good. 

But I am all for tax breaks to targeted industries.   That's not a cash payment.   It's voluntarily not collecting taxes on a new private investment vs not collecting taxes on anything (because it doesn't exist).    Either way, the state/parish won't see direct tax revenue for it.    It's an appropriate stopgap until the state reforms it's horrible tax code, which is something our neighbors to the east (Mississippi) is starting to consider doing.    

The commuter trains where I live now are EMPTY.   I'm honestly not sure if they'll survive this.    Between the Covid-related economic sanctions and the latest push to defund law enforcement, we could be on the verge of another lost decade for America's largest cities.     

My employer insists that more of us can work remotely for a larger percentage of time even after Covid.   If that's true, maybe it's time to move out of the city.  

When was the first  one, I've never heard that term "lost decade"?

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On 11/17/2020 at 3:10 PM, cajun said:

If I had to guess, the metro area is now about 855,000 - 865,000 -  between 5% and 6% growth over 2010 for the 2020 census.    Targeting 905,000 or so by 2030 and 970,000 by 2040 -  barring any major localized natural disaster or unprecedented economic boom that causes unexpected decline or growth.

Baton Rouge has expanded slightly into Cajun country:  I think Assumption parish was added to the Baton Rouge metro area since 2010 although there weren't any news reports on this.    This is the Pierre Part and Paincourtville area.  It's appears that the plants and industrial facilities in Ibberville and West Baton Rouge draw more commuters from that area than Thibodeaux/Houma do at this point.   

  • Assumption Parish new addition to the metro - about 22,000 people although I am having trouble verifying this.
  • Ascension+ Livingston are probably up 25,000-30,000 combined.  They'd be higher if not for the floods of 2016.
  • East Baton Rouge, St. Helena, East Feliciana,  Ibberville, and Pointe Coupee are all either stagnant or down slightly.    Maybe combined net loss of about 1500.
  • West Feliciana and West Baton Rouge may have added about 1,000 combined.   

Of course all of this is really dependent on how Covid impacted the census.   I imagine a lot of college students in the Baton Rouge area moved back home with their parents in March/April of 2020.    Some folks may have also just avoided filling out the census this year.

 

Other trends:

  • Hammond is now it's own metro area, and will not join New Orleans or Baton Rouge.
  • Lafayette (approximately 500,000) and New Orleans (1,275,000) will post some gains as they have both added one new parish each, but the cities themselves are holding steady.
  • Shreveport is probably down slightly, and will officially be replaced by Lafayette as the state's 3rd largest metro when the 2020 census data becomes available.
  • Lake Charles is a question mark, as I think the hurricanes may have impacted the census responses.   I expect this area to have grown though considering the massive industrial expansion happening there.

 

 

 

Cool, thanks for the break-down. Yeah that all sounds about right.

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16 hours ago, dan326 said:

When was the first  one, I've never heard that term "lost decade"?

1970s for New York, probably climaxing in the 1977 world series when announcers could see parts of the Bronx burning down from Yankee stadium  mere days after President Carter toured the area ruins.      1970s were a very bad time for all urban areas in the US, but it was particularly bad for New York.    It looked like it would never recover.   But things worked in their favor - the financial industry took off, local real estate developers took risks (including a certain one that would become president), and worked to rehab a lot of iconic properties,  SDNY started going hard against crime (arguably violating civil rights in the process) while the homeless were pushed out of the more tourist-friendly parts of the city.   

By the late 1980s the city's recovery was gaining a lot of momentum .   They've been doing pretty well until 5-6 years ago.   Now I'm afraid that Covid-related shutdowns and the latest trend to defund (rather than rehab) law enforcement could be a one-two punch that these cities won't easily recover from.  

It's not certain, but it's something I'd keep my eye on if I had property in New York or Los Angeles proper.    Chicago, Seattle, and San Francisco are facing the same problem, but less severe.    As more people start working remotely, a lot of those office developments will struggle to find tenants.    Cities like New Orleans, Orlando, and Las Vegas are going to feel it worse than most, as tourism businesses struggle the most during travel/gathering restrictions.   Those economies, along with the economies of Florida and Hawaii, are based almost entirely on tourism.

There are other trends that could negatively impact larger urban areas:  People who are now allowed to work remotely will start moving to areas with lower costs of living.   I've seen it happen at my employer already, and we are considering a similar move.   

Edited by cajun
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  • 4 months later...

Known as the Old Blue Cross Building then Direct General....still vacant ; 91,000 sq.ft office space ;  built in 1967

Tallest building East of Airline Hwy @ 8 stories ; nearly a Mile & 1/2  from new Amazon Center

IMG_1454.thumb.jpg.d26baa053a36bac4c83a6ee16136eb46.jpg

Just now noticing the garbage in this pic  on Florida Blvd

IMG_1453.thumb.jpg.3f7d52ec5a0b1e421fd27913bf811bb8.jpg

Edited by richyb83
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18 hours ago, richyb83 said:

Known as the Old Blue Cross Building then Direct General....still vacant ; 91,000 sq.ft office space ;  built in 1967

Tallest building East of Airline Hwy @ 8 stories ; nearly a Mile & 1/2  from new Amazon Center

IMG_1454.thumb.jpg.d26baa053a36bac4c83a6ee16136eb46.jpg

Just now noticing the garbage in this pic  on Florida Blvd

IMG_1453.thumb.jpg.3f7d52ec5a0b1e421fd27913bf811bb8.jpg

I'm afraid that building is too far gone.   Would love to see it renovated though.

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  • 3 weeks later...

East Baton Rouge Parish 443,763
Livingston Parish 138,928
Ascension Parish 123,114
Pointe Coupee Parish 22,016
East Feliciana Parish 19,371
West Feliciana Parish 15,428
West Baton Rouge Parish 26,101
St. Helena Parish 10,297
Assumption Parish 22,478
Iberville Parish 32,822
   
Total Metro Area 2020 854,318
Total Metro Area  2010 809,821
Change (additional) +44,497
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On 4/26/2021 at 4:11 PM, cajun said:

Some early Census numbers:  

Louisiana:   4,648,794 (up slightly)

East Baton Rouge:  443,763  (up slightly) 

Baton Rouge:  224,149 (down significantly)

BR's Population  in 2010  was  229,493...over a 5,000 drop
 
Surprised Ascension Parish was not more than 123,000.....
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Well that's cool we at least gained in the metro area.  Looking at trends of other similar cities, it 's lucky we didn't lose population in the 60's, but considering that the city limits aren't expanding anymore, I think the days of increased population in the city proper are over with. Also interesting to see Livingston has become quite more diverse then it used to be, relatively speaking.

Edited by dan326
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14 hours ago, richyb83 said:
BR's Population  in 2010  was  229,493...over a 5,000 drop
 
Surprised Ascension Parish was not more than 123,000.....

Remember, AP had some flooding issues to deal with in 2017.   The whole metro area did, and it may not have fully recovered.

Ascension saw about 30% growth between 1990 and 2000, then 40% growth between 2000 and 2010.    Then somewhere around 16-17% between 2010 and 2020.    They are running out of large scale plots of land that are suitable for residential development.   Newer developments will be smaller and almost "in fill" in nature, and likely more focused in the southern part of the parish towards Gonzales.    This should give them time to advance their infrastructure, but they don't seem to be doing much in that area unfortunately.    Their schools, on the other hand,  are doing very well.   Dutchtown in particular has turned into a very competitive school district, which is reflected in the housing prices in that area.

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1 hour ago, dan326 said:

Well that's cool we at least gained in the metro area.  Looking at trends of other similar cities, it 's lucky we didn't lose population in the 60's, but considering that the city limits aren't expanding anymore, I think the days of increased population in the city proper are over with. Also interesting to see Livingston has become quite more diverse then it used to be, relatively speaking.

2010-2020 was not a good decade for the Baton Rouge metro.  

That being said, I think things are lining up for the better.    It's likely that the next governor will be more Baton Rouge-friendly.    I can't imagine LSU's new president being worse than Alexander, so I'm expecting some growth there.     The Water Campus might start finally hitting its stride when people start returning to work.     

For Livingston....I'd like to see more employment centers in the central part of the parish.    Something like a couple of new distribution centers, an airport, or a new manufacturing plant would really help out there and drive residential growth for the whole area.    And improve the link between Hammond and Baton Rouge economically.     

Power generation in the US will be changing in the next 30-50 years.     It would be nice if we had something tied to that (maybe a transformer manufacturing plant or solar panel manufacturing facility) located to Livingston Parish.    Maybe another facility in the automotive sector can accompany Ferrerra Fire Apparatus once day.

Edited by cajun
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  • 2 weeks later...

Baton Rouge has the 3rd most solar energy potential per capita in the US. Lafayette is #9 and Shreveport is #28. Mobile is #20 and Beaumont is #8. I've said before I would love for Louisiana to embrace and incubate the renewable energy industry, and consolidate the corporate wing of that industry in Baton Rouge and New Orleans.
https://solarpower.guide/solar-energy-insights/solar-potential
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On 5/8/2021 at 4:44 PM, dan326 said:

Cool, that makes sense. I was considering solar energy myself.

It makes much more sense on the roof of your home or on top of a big box store or DC than it does in a giant solar farm. 

I'm not pleased with the giant solar farm in West Baton Rouge.   That's land that doesn't flood.   It should be either agricultural or residential.   Solar panels belong on rooftops, not on a giant farm - they take up far too much space to provide zero jobs and consume developable land that doesn't flood.    Just my $0.02. 

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On 5/9/2021 at 10:48 PM, cajun said:

It makes much more sense on the roof of your home or on top of a big box store or DC than it does in a giant solar farm. 

I'm not pleased with the giant solar farm in West Baton Rouge.   That's land that doesn't flood.   It should be either agricultural or residential.   Solar panels belong on rooftops, not on a giant farm - they take up far too much space to provide zero jobs and consume developable land that doesn't flood.    Just my $0.02. 

Good points I never thought about.

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