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Greenville Photo of the Day


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You've officially reached troll status. 

Your personal attacks on those with any opinion different from yours is REALLY tiresome.  You can discuss the topic or put me on ignore if you don't like my post, but your personal attacks are sad.

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Came across this photo today during some historic preservation research, and thought I'd share it with you all: http://www.nationalregister.sc.gov/greenville/S10817723999/images/S10817723999.jpg

 

Such a travesty it was lost, but at least a quality development has ended up in that spot.

 

That was the old City Hall. I believe it ended up having some structural issues. 

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That was the old City Hall. I believe it ended up having some structural issues. 

I seriously doubt that. I have never heard that comment before.  Buildings from that era were buit to last.  In the '60's and '70's anything 'old' was considered inferior, that comment was likely just justification for demolition when it was pretty controversial at the time.     

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A Greenville News article last April reported that there were indeed some problems. "The tile roof leaked so much that rainwater found its way to the first floor. It was impossible to heat and cool. And government had outgrown it." Nevertheless, a plan was developed to save the building and link it to the new city hall via a patio, but it was never adopted and the city instead built the garage and "International Plaza" - both of which, like the old city hall, are now but memories. http://www.greenvilleonline.com/article/20130428/DOWNTOWN/304280002/Though-treasures-been-lost-downtown-finds-value-history

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A Greenville News article last April reported that there were indeed some problems. "The tile roof leaked so much that rainwater found its way to the first floor. It was impossible to heat and cool. And government had outgrown it." Nevertheless, a plan was developed to save the building and link it to the new city hall via a patio, but it was never adopted and the city instead built the garage and "International Plaza" - both of which, like the old city hall, are now but memories. http://www.greenvilleonline.com/article/20130428/DOWNTOWN/304280002/Though-treasures-been-lost-downtown-finds-value-history

 

That is based on one person's recollection. Tile roofs can be fixed and water will go where gravity takes it.  BTW, Charleston did NOT preserve it's history because it didn't have any money.  The preservation ordinances have been on the books since the 1930's and were expanded and strengthened in the '60's.  There was plenty of new construction in Charleston, it just went to West Ashley, North Charleston, Mt. Pleasant because the historic areas were already developed and protected from demolition for the most part.        

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woodside_building.JPGW

You guys should persuade Hughes to replicate this beauty in his redevelopment of the Windstream building site! Such a wonderful building, travesty it was lost to "progress". 

Agreed.   Major, major loss.  Not sure how the city of Greenville ever let this happen.

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