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billypc99

A Call for Help...Im moving (again)

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I am taking a new job in Pleasanton, CA and looking for areas to live:

http://www.ci.pleasanton.ca.us/airport.html

I am hoping that some of you can provide some insight/experiences into Oakland, San Jose or any surronding areas in terms of living experience.

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Ooof, East Bay!

I lived in Berkeley briefly. Very expensive, overall pretty nice. I would suggest looking there first. At least it has some life and culture. I believe there are some nice areas of north Oakland that are up and coming as well, but there are wide swaths of pretty bad 'hoods.

Not much help, I know, but could get you started.

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Ooof, East Bay!

I lived in Berkeley briefly. Very expensive, overall pretty nice. I would suggest looking there first. At least it has some life and culture. I believe there are some nice areas of north Oakland that are up and coming as well, but there are wide swaths of pretty bad 'hoods.

Not much help, I know, but could get you started.

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Isn't Oakland like a somewhat violent city?

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Indeed.  Probably something you don't get too much of in Providence.

mn_oakriots-crowdwave_kk.jpg

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No not Providence, stuff like that only happens at URI. :lol:

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As a matter of fact I drove through Pleasanton CA today on 690 coming back to Vallejo from San Jose. Yes, it's a refreshing 60 degrees outside now in the Bay Area and no humidity.

I don't know much about Oakland but I was there yesterday and saw no violance or mayhem of any kind.

I did see some very nice residential streets around Telegraph Ave not far from Berkeley. I think it was the 40s or 50s as far as cross streets go. Lots of very cute little stucco bungalows painted in all kinds of funky colors and on Telegraph some really cool stores selling knitting stuff, retro-chic antiques, as well as some Ethiopian and Eritrean restaurants. Also I saw what was called the Black Muslim Bakery.

Drove up Telegraph into downtown Oakland and saw some definite signs of urban decay but also beautiful buildings including an old Sears that being converted to condos. Other highlights were a giant Art Deco movie palace and a 60s style Jetsons hamburger stand.

Oakland definitely has a reputation but I'm sure you can find some nice areas like the one I just described. Also the hills of Oakland are very expensive with million dollar homes just like those in Berkeley.

As far as Pleasanton goes, just like places like Walnut Creek and Concord, they seem very sunbeltish to me-totally new and very sprawling. The natural scenery is awesome when it comes to the surrounding hills and huge vistas (you can see for miles and miles) but the prevailing approach to development is to have pretty tightly clustered housing areas with cul-de-sacs and then lotsa strip malls. But there are also some nice older (and very upscale) place like Lafayette scattered around Contra Costa county.

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Yeah, you have to go to Boston or URI for that kind of action.

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Providence hasen't seen that kinda action since the '60's riots on Prairie Ave.

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Providence hasen't seen that kinda action since the '60's riots on Prairie Ave.

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For those of you with Projo archive subscriptions, didn't David Brussat write an interesting article about how race riots happened as early as the late 1880's in part of Northern downtown?

- Garris

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Sorry, I don't have that subscription.

If I'm interpreting those photos correctly, they aren't pictures of a race riot in Oakland, though- I think they're pics of a Raiders riot.

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For those of you with Projo archive subscriptions, didn't David Brussat write an interesting article about how race riots happened as early as the late 1880's in part of Northern downtown?

- Garris

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I rememeber that column too, it was very interesting. But I don't have an archive subscription either. :(

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I rememeber that column too, it was very interesting.  But I don't have an archive subscription either.  :(

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From ProvidenceRI.com:

"During the 1820s, as Providence became more densely populated, as its older houses became less habitable, and as its factories darkened the landscape, tensions increased between the white working class and the black community. The fact that Negroes were stripped of the right to vote in 1822 and were segregated by the Providence School Law of 1828 intensified their resentment.

Most blacks lived in an area called Hard-Scrabble (present-day Moshassuck Square) or minor race riot occurred in Hard-Scrabble in October 1824. Although it resulted in no deaths and only moderate damage, it shocked the citizenry and kindled debate not only on the issues of race but also on those of law and order and governmental reform. The old town meeting system, said some, was no longer adequate for the administration and security of a community harboring nearly 17,000 socially and racially antagonistic residents.

...

Here things stood until September 1831, when another race racer riot erupted, much more serious than that of 1824, beginning with a clash between some rowdy white sailors and blacks living in Olney's Lane. This four-day episode, in which five men died, was the final catalyst for municipal change. A town meeting on October 5, 1831, promptly decided "that it is expedient to adopt a city form of government." The General Assembly agreed. In November the charter was issued and ratified by the town's electorate, 459 to 188. Another stage in the history of Providence had passed.

And From Rootsweb.com:

"1831. A riot of four days continuance commenced Sept. 21, in Olney's lane, North end. It originated with some sailors and the colored people living in the lane, one of the former being shot by a black man, and instantly killed. An immediate attack was made on the houses, and two were promptly destroyed. Each evening the mob increased in number, and violence. The efforts of the Town Council and the Sheriff to suppress it were ineffectual, and the services of the military were called into requisition by the Governor. On the fourth evening, the corps, near Shingle Bridge, were assailed by the crowd, with stones and other missles, and were commanded to fire, which they did, and four men fell mortally wounded. The crowd dispersed, and quiet was restored. Nearly twenty small houses had been destroyed or badly injured. -- At a town meeting, Nov. 22, more than three-fifths of the votes polled were in favor of a City Charter."

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