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Transit Oriented Development

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Transit Oriented Development

Miami has taken the lead in Florida with its implementation. One wonders how all of those buildings in Miami's downtown don't flood the streets with traffic. I asked this question to my good buddy Aessotoriq, another forumer, and he tells me its because Miami has chosen to develop high density along Mass Transit Corridors... almost a no brainer, yet Miami is the only city in Florida doing it!

With the land shortages in Tallahassee, and our low density roadways, you'd figure this city would be working on a way to do the same. No longer should we be afraid to push the limits with regard to height along our Downtown Roadways, especially Monroe, Gaines, College, Brounough, and Duval, we should encourage it.

We ought to develop a mass transit system that runs along these busy roadways that would be able to carry passengers to and from work and other major community destinations with ease. It can be done with a little determination. Gas isn't getting any cheaper, and God isn't making anymore land, we've got to use what he gave us more efficiently.

Any thoughts on this Transit Oriented Development... if Miami is good for nothing else, they are good at helping us learn how to cope with growth.

miamibiscayneblvd0dz.jpg

Image Courtesy of Miami Forum

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Imagine the benifits of having a street car that ran this route...

TransitRoute.jpg

These high traffic areas would benifit from the use of a transit system to get them to and from the Downtown Business district and to the major shopping areas, in addition to the universities. Plus this means moving forward with more high density development along the Downtown and Gaines Street Corridors.

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T.O.D. : It stands for Transit Oriented Development and Miami has taken the lead in Florida with its implimentation. One wonders how all of those buildings in Miami's downtown don't flood the streets with traffic. I asked this question to my good buddy Aessotoriq, another forumer, and he tells me its because Miami has chosen to develop high density along Mass Transit Corridors... almost a no brainer, yet Miami is the only city in Florida doing it!miamibiscayneblvd0dz.jpg

Image Courtesy of Miami Forum

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

While Miami has certainly taken a lead in Transit Oriented Developments, its not the only city in the state with a significant number of TODs. Both Tampa and Jacksonville are also seeing a good number of TODs beginning to pop up around their mass transit lines (Jax-Skyway & Tampa-Streetcar). Jax's Southbank currently has 670 TOD units under construction and another 4,000 approved or proposed.

If Tally were to build a streetcar line, I think it would be best to find a way to run it along streets parallel (but within walking distance) to Monroe St. to help attract more people in residential areas to ride it, instead of getting into their SUVs and clogging the local road system. Something, possibly stretching down West Tennessee or Pensacola (areas with large student populations) should also be looked at.

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I agree that a mass transit for the students will be a great idea. Students would be more willing to use it, and FSU could possible contribute to the project. Great idea for tallahassee. Pensicola and Tennessee could have high rider rates if stretch to ocala. South, at least to Orange, with plans to expand on orange to innovation and blairstone. North to the Mall sounds good, SE to Gov Square wouuld be nice for students too. Also, a leg to the killearn area might be too far, but maybe a park and ride?

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In my opinion, Tallahasse's bus system seems to do the job I guess.

Most students at State or Fam just drive everywhere they need to go, or if not they ride the bus.

Tennessee and Monroe does get backed up pretty bad during Tallahasse's

version of rush hour, but I myself dont see a need for more public transportation

than it already has.

oh yeah, by the way

that is a nice rendering of biscayne bulvd.

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planning for the future makes mass transit not only neccissary, but required. Downtown tallahassee needs to support the infill it wants, and four lane roads will not do it. No major roadwork other than adams seems to be in the works for downtown. Out rush hour traffic jam will be a parking lot just because there are no major alternatives that might be ale to effectivley move thosands of more vehicles. the bussess are traffic stoppers, we need a co-existing mass transit that would increase infill, not just manage the proposed increase.

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What is involved in a streetcar system? I can't see there being room on the sides of the roads mentioned for a new type of public transportation to be developed.

Here's my crazy non-serious proposal: sky buckets. You know, like they have at amusement parks. Or (slightly more seriously) how about a monorail?

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What makes streetcars so great is that they can operate in mixed traffic in the same lanes that cars travel on. You don't have to give them a dedicated lane to run in and they can carry more people than a bus can. Plus since they're electrically powered, no smelly diesel fumes.

Also streetcar construction goes hand in hand with traffic signal synchronization. When installed properly, a streetcar approaching an intersection will trigger a green light, letting it whiz through the intersection.

The Miami forum has a dedicated to the subject, if you'd like more info...

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^Nice breakdown there Aessotariq!

Like he said there are several benifits to having streetcars.

In response to 95-Souf, I'd like to think any city should take a look into the future of its roads as it continues to grow. Tallahassee is experiencing growth at a record pace, and while "our version of rush hour" may not be bad enough in some people's opinion, more and more people moving to the City's central core will soon change that.

What we need is fewer automobiles on the road and more people using mass transit methods such as street cars, busses, bikes, and feet. We realize gasoline is not getting any cheaper, which is why I encourage all who can, to start as soon as possible learning how to ride the bus whenever possible.

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I'm reviving this thread because of an article in the Tallahassee Democrat today which indicates local planners and

Urban development is essential to curbing greenhouse emissions

By Bruce Ritchie

DEMOCRAT STAFF WRITER

The Urban Land Institute will release "Growing Cooler: The Evidence on Urban Development and Climate Change" at 10 a.m. The 1000 Friends of Florida group also is involved in the release.

The Urban Land Institute says the report includes extensive research on the relationship between urban development and the carbon dioxide emitted by motor vehicles.

The group says the report will address issues including:

  • Why it is essential to use urban growth strategies to curb CO2 emissions from automobiles

  • How much transportation-related benefits society can expect to see from creating more compact growth

  • What policy changes and recommendations will make compact growth possible.

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Ah but then in direct opposition to that finding, the County votes this proposal down:

Ending State Review of Land Use changes in Urban Core

I see where you've already commented on it TJ, good points especially about the sprawl and permitting process.

Looks like since this is proposed for areas from Cap. Circle/I-10 and w/in, the City would have more say-so in the matter than the County. Ah double government, you gotta love it.

I see the powerful group CONA is fighting it and often times they have great objectives, but their well-intended preservation passion gets in the way of logic IMHO. In this case it's true, the State (the part of the review they are talking about eliminating) rarely if ever objects to projects based on neighborhood compatibility...that's often the job of local government, so in effect what CONA is most concerned w/isn't happening anyway.

Hooray for COT on this matter!

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Ah but then in direct opposition to that finding, the County votes this proposal down:

Ending State Review of Land Use changes in Urban Core

I see where you've already commented on it TJ, good points especially about the sprawl and permitting process.

Looks like since this is proposed for areas from Cap. Circle/I-10 and w/in, the City would have more say-so in the matter than the County. Ah double government, you gotta love it.

I see the powerful group CONA is fighting it and often times they have great objectives, but their well-intended preservation passion gets in the way of logic IMHO. In this case it's true, the State (the part of the review they are talking about eliminating) rarely if ever objects to projects based on neighborhood compatibility...that's often the job of local government, so in effect what CONA is most concerned w/isn't happening anyway.

Hooray for COT on this matter!

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