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wishiwereinfl

Loudoun County, VA

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Once recognized as the fastest growing county in the us, loudoun county continues to grow more and more. With amenities such as Dulles Town Center, featuring restaurants and a large number of stores, and companies such as AOL and MCI, loudoun's home prices contiune to grow. Many stores and conveniences are now moving into the area, including loudoun's second wegmans supermarket, 2 stadium seating movie theaters, a pf changs, a clydes country inn, and various bookstores such as barnes and noble. Because suburban sprawl is so evident in the eastern part of the county, the western part is considering breaking off and forming Catoctin County. The western part of the county is trying to maintain its natural beauty and elegance, which has allowed it to be compared to westchester county, ny. Many of this will come as a shock to you, and i'm interested to find out your thoughts about Loudoun.

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On a visit to Purcellville last year, I was horrified to see McMansions sprouting everywhere. Beautiful places don't stay beautiful without careful planning. Sadly, I see little of this in the D.C. suburbs. The recent realignment of jobs in the Washington suburbs will surely fuel sprawl. Loudoun needs to be carefully monitored before it is spoiled.

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A little fact for you guys: Loudoun County had 169,599 people in 2000 and had a 31% increase by July 2003, then they had 221,741 people.

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Man, just when i I never thought I would hear the name Purcellville ever again. i actually grew up the first half of my life all over northern VA and Purcellville. i even remember the schools i went too(Emerick Elementry and Blue Ridge Middle). i'd love to go back to see what it looks like now that im not eleven anymore.

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No Signs Of Pause In N.Va. Growth[/size[

Study Puts State 7th In Gain Since 2000

Northern Virginia has grown by nearly 14 percent, or about 293,000 people, in the past five years, according to annual estimates produced by the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service. Virginia as a whole gained more people than all but six other states, and 60 percent of the state's growth occurred in Northern Virginia, the center found.

Leading the way was Loudoun County, which the center estimates grew by a "phenomenal" 82,700, or 49 percent, in the past five years. Prince William County was close behind, with an increase of 74,500 over that period. Fairfax County, though not growing at the same rate, still added 52,400 residents since 2000.

article

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Housing Assessments In Loudoun Rise 28%

Average for 1-Family Home Is $516,000; County, Unlike Some, Sees No Slowdown

Housing assessments in Loudoun County will rise by an average of 28 percent this year, the biggest increase in at least 16 years and a reflection of the county's astonishing growth.

The average assessment of a single-family home in Loudoun, previously $403,430, is now $516,390, according to county data. If Loudoun supervisors don't lower the county's rate during budget deliberations, the average annual tax bill will jump from $4,196 to $5,370.

article

I gotta say, $5k a year for taxes is just insane.

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Try 9k in Fort Lauderdale....for a two bedroom condo. :sick:

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Amazing.... I am from North Carolina and considering a move to the area. Its a suburban area right outside of Greensboro and you can get a home in a development around $200,000--3 bedroom, 2 bath home, 2200 square feet, 1/2 acre of land... and your tax bill will likely be right around $1000.

Tax bills and home prices up there are absolutely ridiculous.

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Amazing.... I am from North Carolina and considering a move to the area. Its a suburban area right outside of Greensboro and you can get a home in a development around $200,000--3 bedroom, 2 bath home, 2200 square feet, 1/2 acre of land... and your tax bill will likely be right around $1000.

Tax bills and home prices up there are absolutely ridiculous.

Home prices have gotten rediculous just about everywhere. Everywhere it seems except North Carolina. Know someone that moved to Raleigh recently and bought a home down there for $150K that would probably sell for closer to $800K in Fairfax. What is NC doing different than everywhere else that is keeping their prices so reasonable??

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Excellent question! Maybe a popular relocation of young professionals?? I have quite a few classmates of mine who want to move to DC after graduation, but it just doesnt really appeal to me if the home/apt prices are as ugly as they are. Suburbs of DC pretty much have anything NC cities have minus the horrendous traffic. There is traffic in the larger cities (Charlotte, Greensboro, Raleigh, W-S, Durham, etc), but nothing like 2-3 hour traffic jams on the Capital Beltway.

Acutally, you can get even more home for your buck in SC, GA, AL, MS, and TX when compared to NC. I have seen homes here in the $300K-$500K price range (3, 4,5 bedrm, 2-3 bath, 3 car garage, land, etc, etc, etc) that are pretty comparable in some Dallas suburbs costing only $150-250K.

Home prices have gotten rediculous just about everywhere. Everywhere it seems except North Carolina. Know someone that moved to Raleigh recently and bought a home down there for $150K that would probably sell for closer to $800K in Fairfax. What is NC doing different than everywhere else that is keeping their prices so reasonable??

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Yeah, but as a North Carolinian, I can still say that I would prefer to live in DC Metro because the culture is much more progressive and exciting than North Carolina. In a couple of decades, NC will probably have caught up, but it is still too conservative and slow in the Old North State for me to live there right now.

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It would have caught up but in the place DC was.

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Loudoun Leads in Assessment Appeals

County Among Several in N.Va. Fielding More Complaints Over Home Values

The number of Loudoun County residents appealing their property tax assessments has tripled this year, a sign of a backlash throughout Northern Virginia to another year of double-digit percentage increases -- and higher tax bills. McKenna never questioned the accuracy of her assessment; her home in Lansdowne rose in value from $619,600 to $830,400.

story

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Loudoun To Restrict Growth

Board Votes 5-4 For Compromise

Loudoun County supervisors yesterday approved a far-reaching plan to restrict home building in the county's rural west, taking the first step toward guiding long-term growth in the region's fastest-growing jurisdiction.

Nonetheless, yesterday's action, if it stands up in court, ultimately could reduce the number of homes that could be built in the west from 37,000 to roughly half that. It puts Loudoun at the forefront of regional efforts to guide growth as Washington's booming suburbs are increasingly snarled in traffic, struggling with soaring property taxes and losing their remaining open space to sprawl. It would minimize potential growth in population, traffic and demand for government services. And it would help preserve a pastoral, 300-square-mile area of open farmland, large estates and undisturbed views of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Here's what has been allowed in western Loudon heretofore: houses on three-acre lots.

PH2006090700044.jpg

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Sounds like a move in the right direction. Controlling growth is going to be an ongoing issue I am pretty sure.

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Land Everywhere; Not a Bit to Buy

Loudoun Boom Impedes School Expansion Plan

Randy Vlad cruised the outskirts of Purcellville one afternoon this month in a hybrid sport-utility vehicle, window-shopping for land.

He pointed to a vacant field north of town. "Gone," he pronounced, noting that it had been subdivided for residential lots. He passed an old farm as he turned onto Route 9. "That's gone, too," he said. He tried to remember whether it was Toll Brothers or another home builder who had gotten there first.

story

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GMU Hits Stumbling Block in Plan for Campus Near Dulles

George Mason University's ambitious plan to open a campus in southeastern Loudoun County has snagged on a polarizing land-use decision over whether to allow nearly 34,000 homes across a rural swath near Dulles International Airport

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To Preserve Local Land, Town Fights School Plan. Facility Is Key to Handling Growth, County Says

The small western Loudoun County town of Purcellville is taking on the county and one of its biggest developers -- the school system -- with the hope of managing growth in the once-rural area.

Officials in the town of 6,500 are seeking to block construction of a proposed high school on county-owned land just north of the town. They argue that construction requires town approval, which is the same argument that was used to challenge an elementary school outside of Hamilton that was scheduled to open next year.

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Dulles South Project is Finished

Plans to build a huge project south of Dulls Airport in Loudoun County have ended. Personally, I thought this project was simply too big for the region and would have promoted unhealthy sprawl.

The Washington Post

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For Now, Loudoun Curbs Dulles Growth

In a single, dramatic day in January 2004, a freshly minted Republican majority on the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors reversed eight years of slow-growth policy.

Supervisors opened a vast territory west of Dulles International Airport to water and sewers, and they ordered an about-face on the county's support for a series of slow-growth legislative initiatives in Richmond.

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Revenue Pinch in Loudoun's Forecast

Officials Bracing For Downturn In Assessments

After leading the region with double-digit increases in property assessments, Loudoun County taxpayers should expect their home values to decline in each of the next two years, county budget officials said yesterday.

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