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It also stated this in that article "The project was first proposed in 2003 as two seven-story apartment buildings. Now the developer has an agreement with the city to refine the proposal over the next four months and negotiate the sale of the land." And according to this caption on the article "Source: Virginian - Pilot Publication date: 2005-06-08" Maybe we'll be hearing something soon :whistling: . It's way past 4 months from the date of that article and it would be awfully nice to have a rendering. I'll have to check design review committee archives to see if anything came through that we missed.

Yes, a rendering would be nice. :whistling:

This tower has the potential to be very special with the LRT tied into the footprint. I'm interested in seeing what conceptual designs they have for the site (w/ the tower, LRT, and I believe townhomes).

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Amtrak will add a 3rd Norfolk to DC train sometime this year. https://www.pilotonline.com/news/transportation/vp-nw-passenger-rail-hampton-roads-buttigieg-northam-20210331-zdpqhmjqzfe5rcioi3brqor

Not that any of this will happen, but just looking at this map, I can see directions the city should go with light rail and BRT.  Bus Rapid Transit from the Naval Base to Military Circle does make sen

Once it's 4 lanes, then people will really see why a third crossing is needed

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If HRT payed 207 million I would flip, considering the cost of the whole project is 280 million. Doesn't leave much room for actually costructing things. The three million is more accurate.

The ROW is only valued around $50 million, if I remember correctly. I believe that also includes the portion in VB.

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Video quality sucks dude!

My God Rus, bad day? I think the videos awesome cause it shows exactly how light rail will look when it's actually running. It just gives a good sense of how Norfolk will look and feel one day. I mean to be honest the initial Granby Tower video wasn't that high of quality either.

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My God Rus, bad day? I think the videos awesome cause it shows exactly how light rail will look when it's actually running. It just gives a good sense of how Norfolk will look and feel one day. I mean to be honest the initial Granby Tower video wasn't that high of quality either.

No I couldn't make it out really. I will look at it again when i get home. I just got a 20.1" widescreen LCD monitor today! It just might be the VGA card in this computer at work

I wasn't talking about the actual train or anything. It looks cool but had trouble making it out.

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Looking at where it runs, I like Norfolk's starter line. They always talked about going to major employment centers: the Medical Center, Downtown, Ingleside, and Kroger Business/Sentra Leigh/Newtown. They've also talked about NSU. What hasn't really been brought up as much is that it swings through both upper-middle and working class neighborhoods. So now you have residents who can use it to get from home to work. Toss in entertainment and shopping venues such as Harbor Park, MacArthur, and Granby, and you have a line that serves all aspects of life. The RISE center will be a boon to the line. And likewise, the line will be a boon to Fort Norfolk/Atlantic City.

What I have trouble imagining is tieing in the burbs. As TC gets built, bringing it in makes sense as does extending the line to the Strip which would spur denser development around Witchduck, Little Neck, Lynnhaven, and Hilltop. But what about all those people in VB, Cpeake, and Suffolk who live in subdivisions. Are we talking about massive park-n-ride garages? Otherwise, you'll end up with underused overpriced feeder lines.

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Not particularly related to Norfolk, but here's a link to a case study about development opportunities around transit stops. It's quite interesting.

vdogg, you've brought up one of my favorite planning topics: transit-oriented development (TOD)

I have a shameless plug to offer. The Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University (I worked there for a year) produces a "Transit-Friendly Development" newsletter. It has news, information, and links about transit village and TOD initiatives in New Jersey. NJ has 19 designated transit villages, with many more seeking to receive the designation every year. I had the pleasure of studying some of the municipalities that applied for Transit Village status in 2004 and were rejected to find out how they could strengthen their transit village qualities, goals, and objectives, and be better able to compete in the future. It was a fun study.

Apart from the Transit Village Initiative, TOD development projects are all over the place. Dense commercial and residential areas near train stations are being revived, and Park-&-Ride lots are being developed into mixed-use communities. The combination of renewed interest in dense living and quick and easy commutes to Newark, Jersey City, and New York make these arrangements VERY attractive to professionals and empty nesters.

Check out Transit-Friendly Development. Lots of interesting reads that are applicable beyond NJ...

...VTC - Transit Friendly Development

NOW, to come back to Norfolk...

Norfolk's light rail could generate the same sorts of activity. Picture redevelopment and appearance of mixed-use, walkable villages near some of the LRT stations. Picture parking ratios of 1.5 spaces/unit drop below 1 space/unit! That drop not only means fewer cars on the road, but also significantly decreased development cost.

Places like Town Center, Port Warwick, Newport News City Center, etc., are developed like many TODs. The major difference is these HR examples lack transit. You still have to drive to get into them, and only then can you leave your car behind (in a massive parking area, most likely), and walk around. Neither I nor the staunchest supporters of TOD argue it will get rid of automobiles, rather it provides alternative lifestyles and activities that do not require car-dependence.

Within 5-10 years of the opening of Norfolk's light rail I wouldn't be surprised to see TODs springing up along the line. Assuming the LRT service is fast, easy to use, and dependable the option will be irresistible to many

who do not wish to or cannot afford to live downtown!

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vdogg, you've brought up one of my favorite planning topics: transit-oriented development (TOD)

I have a shameless plug to offer. The Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University (I worked there for a year) produces a "Transit-Friendly Development" newsletter. It has news, information, and links about transit village and TOD initiatives in New Jersey. NJ has 19 designated transit villages, with many more seeking to receive the designation every year. I had the pleasure of studying some of the municipalities that applied for Transit Village status in 2004 and were rejected to find out how they could strengthen their transit village qualities, goals, and objectives, and be better able to compete in the future. It was a fun study.

Apart from the Transit Village Initiative, TOD development projects are all over the place. Dense commercial and residential areas near train stations are being revived, and Park-&-Ride lots are being developed into mixed-use communities. The combination of renewed interest in dense living and quick and easy commutes to Newark, Jersey City, and New York make these arrangements VERY attractive to professionals and empty nesters.

Check out Transit-Friendly Development. Lots of interesting reads that are applicable beyond NJ...

...VTC - Transit Friendly Development

NOW, to come back to Norfolk...

Norfolk's light rail could generate the same sorts of activity. Picture redevelopment and appearance of mixed-use, walkable villages near some of the LRT stations. Picture parking ratios of 1.5 spaces/unit drop below 1 space/unit! That drop not only means fewer cars on the road, but also significantly decreased development cost.

Places like Town Center, Port Warwick, Newport News City Center, etc., are developed like many TODs. The major difference is these HR examples lack transit. You still have to drive to get into them, and only then can you leave your car behind (in a massive parking area, most likely), and walk around. Neither I nor the staunchest supporters of TOD argue it will get rid of automobiles, rather it provides alternative lifestyles and activities that do not require car-dependence.

Within 5-10 years of the opening of Norfolk's light rail I wouldn't be surprised to see TODs springing up along the line. Assuming the LRT service is fast, easy to use, and dependable the option will be irresistible to many

who do not wish to or cannot afford to live downtown!

Those are very good points! I believe this is what Norfolk is hoping will happen. The only way most of this will work is with a regional attitude.

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vdogg, you've brought up one of my favorite planning topics: transit-oriented development (TOD)

I have a shameless plug to offer. The Voorhees Transportation Center at Rutgers University (I worked there for a year) produces a "Transit-Friendly Development" newsletter. It has news, information, and links about transit village and TOD initiatives in New Jersey. NJ has 19 designated transit villages, with many more seeking to receive the designation every year. I had the pleasure of studying some of the municipalities that applied for Transit Village status in 2004 and were rejected to find out how they could strengthen their transit village qualities, goals, and objectives, and be better able to compete in the future. It was a fun study.

Apart from the Transit Village Initiative, TOD development projects are all over the place. Dense commercial and residential areas near train stations are being revived, and Park-&-Ride lots are being developed into mixed-use communities. The combination of renewed interest in dense living and quick and easy commutes to Newark, Jersey City, and New York make these arrangements VERY attractive to professionals and empty nesters.

Check out Transit-Friendly Development. Lots of interesting reads that are applicable beyond NJ...

...VTC - Transit Friendly Development

NOW, to come back to Norfolk...

Norfolk's light rail could generate the same sorts of activity. Picture redevelopment and appearance of mixed-use, walkable villages near some of the LRT stations. Picture parking ratios of 1.5 spaces/unit drop below 1 space/unit! That drop not only means fewer cars on the road, but also significantly decreased development cost.

Places like Town Center, Port Warwick, Newport News City Center, etc., are developed like many TODs. The major difference is these HR examples lack transit. You still have to drive to get into them, and only then can you leave your car behind (in a massive parking area, most likely), and walk around. Neither I nor the staunchest supporters of TOD argue it will get rid of automobiles, rather it provides alternative lifestyles and activities that do not require car-dependence.

Within 5-10 years of the opening of Norfolk's light rail I wouldn't be surprised to see TODs springing up along the line. Assuming the LRT service is fast, easy to use, and dependable the option will be irresistible to many

who do not wish to or cannot afford to live downtown!

I actually stayed in the doubletree hotel in Jersey City right next to one of the transit stops and i know exactly what you mean by TOD. This dense cluster of office, hotel, and residential high rises surrounding the NJ LRT transit stop is exactly how I picture TC one day if Va. Beach ever gets on the Light rail boat.

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I have noticed the same thing in Nova. Even the smallish suburbs have areas that are densely built up close to where the Metro passes through them. I would imagine bc of LRT in Norfolk, that eventually you will find 'hotspots' or housing/mixed use buildings that are built around the stations. I noticed also that housing near the stops can command a premium over those that are not.

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I have noticed the same thing in Nova. Even the smallish suburbs have areas that are densely built up close to where the Metro passes through them. I would imagine bc of LRT in Norfolk, that eventually you will find 'hotspots' or housing/mixed use buildings that are built around the stations. I noticed also that housing near the stops can command a premium over those that are not.

Here in Montr

Edited by Glassoul
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Here's a great editorial on Norfolks light rail that I'm surprised nobody's picked up yet.

Light Rail moves closer to station

Vabeach :rolleyes: .............I think this is their time to jump in now :whistling: I don't know if they will or not :unsure: but I sure hope so cause it would be a huge plus for the region and they should have mentioned that Newport News is in the beginning stages with the feds right now and are also trying to push for it and want to eventually tie it to Norfolks! :yahoo: with the third crossing and lets hope that Portsmouth will too!

Edited by rusthebuss
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Railroad chief urges cooperation among cities

If they expect to alleviate traffic congestion and resolve other problems, Hampton Roads cities must work more closely with one another, the chairman of Norfolk Southern Corp. told a business gathering Thursday

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