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vdogg

Norfolk Schools and education

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Does anyone know what the largest public high school is in Norfolk (in student numbers)? What about the largest in Hampton Roads?

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The largest in HR is Vabeach and the largest in the state is Fairfax county.

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The largest in HR is Vabeach and the largest in the state is Fairfax county.

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Somehow that doesn't answer my question. Let me make it clearer.

1. What is the largest public high school in norfolk? please give number of students.

2. What is the largest public high school in hampton roads? please give number of students.

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Somehow that doesn't answer my question. Let me make it clearer.

1. What is the largest public high school in norfolk? please give number of students.

2. What is the largest public high school in hampton roads? please give number of students.

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Norfolk's largest is (I believe, if I'm wrong someone correct me) Granby. Somewhere in the neighborhood of upper-2000 students.

Virginia Beach's Princess Anne HS is their largest, but Idk numbers. Between 2500-3000 easily.

And TABB HIGH SCHOOL has 1350 hahaha. Too bad we were built for 750. <_<

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Norfolk's largest is (I believe, if I'm wrong someone correct me) Granby.  Somewhere in the neighborhood of upper-2000 students.

Virginia Beach's Princess Anne HS is their largest, but Idk numbers.  Between 2500-3000 easily.

And TABB HIGH SCHOOL has 1350 hahaha.  Too bad we were built for 750.  <_<

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haha I know what you mean....there's two American public schools where I am. My school (built in the 50's or 60's) went from 650 last year to 800 this year! The other school holds about 900. The military is adding so many new families to this area!

Thanks for giving me the numbers though. I've seen some pics of the Norfolk schools and they **look** nice, from the outside.

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First off, congrats to Norfolk Public Schools on winning the Eli Broad Award. They did it by beating out far larger districts such as Boston, Houston, San Fran, and NYC.

Second, where are you people getting enrollment numbers? According to 04-05 VB School Report Cards (from www.vbschools.com) PA had 2150 students. The largest was Kellam at over 2400 followed by Ocean Lakes, which is why they are rezoning Kellam, Ocean Lakes, and Landstown. Over 20 years ago, PA did top out at around 2800 according to the school's website. Salem hit even higher numbers before Landstown opened. The smallest school is Green Run at 1660.

According to the 04-05 school report cards posted by Virginia Dept of Ed, here are enrollment numbers for Norfolk HS:

Booker T.: 1375

Granby: 2182

Lake Taylor: 1507

Maury: 1946

Norview: 1751

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Stepping it up a few degrees

Virginia Wesleyan embarks on $41 million improvement campaign

By Janet Dunphy

Inside Business - Hampton Roads

Monday October 10, 2005

Virginia Wesleyan College is hoping to generate a spark and maybe even light a fire under donors to raise $65 million to upgrade its campus and win a Phi Beta Kappa charter.

The achievement would give the school an elite status. The College of William and Mary, where the academic honor society was founded in 1776, is the only other school in Hampton Roads with a chapter.

article

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If your an African American family growing up in Norfolk, home school your child or save enough money to send them to private school, Norfolk Public Schools is a black hole for African American childern.

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If your an African American family growing up in Norfolk, home school your child or save enough money to send them to private school, Norfolk Public Schools is a black hole for African American childern.

What is that suppose to mean? I went to NPS all my life except for a few years in private school

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If your an African American family growing up in Norfolk, home school your child or save enough money to send them to private school, Norfolk Public Schools is a black hole for African American childern.

Unfortunately most parents can't afford to home school. If a 2 parent household exists (big if nowadays) they are likely both working. African American families shouldn't have to stay home, Norfolk should get its act together. Their taxes pay for public schools whether they homeschool or not. I would put the emphasis on public officials. Maybe it's time to fire a few school board members if it's truly that bad.

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I still don't know what he means by that. I'm white and went to NPS and I'm doing fine. I weant to the all of the worse schools in NPS. I went to St. Helena in Berkely and BTW H.S. Its all what you do with it. I used it as a motivation to improve myself. I did struggle for a while but I'm really getting on track now.

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Norfolk Public Schools had 16 Black males graduate with a 3.0 gpa or above. A principle actually was quoted saying the reason her students don't look at UVA, Tech, William and Mary, ect. was because it was too far from home. If you were an African American family with childern, especially a male, would you put him in that type of enviroment? This is borderline criminal.

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Norfolk Public Schools had 16 Black males graduate with a 3.0 gpa or above. A principle actually was quoted saying the reason her students don't look at UVA, Tech, William and Mary, ect. was because it was too far from home. If you were an African American family with childern, especially a male, would you put him in that type of enviroment? This is borderline criminal.

How is that the school system? I graduated from there with around 3.0 gpa and was getting introuble all the time? Each student has to want to complete school and do their best. There is plenty of help out there and is offered all the time. I went to BTW so I know. Most students in NPS are trying to live the thug life so to say and make fast money. I have been told I was stupid cause I paid attention in class and actually went to class.

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How is that the school system? I graduated from there with around 3.0 gpa and was getting introuble all the time? Each student has to want to complete school and do their best. There is plenty of help out there and is offered all the time. I went to BTW so I know. Most students in NPS are trying to live the thug life so to say and make fast money. I have been told I was stupid cause I paid attention in class and actually went to class.

Yes, but if the teachers don't believe in the students the students won't believe in themselves. Education is very much a give and take process. I believe he is trying to refer to the visible lack of effort.

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Yes, but if the teachers don't believe in the students the students won't believe in themselves. Education is very much a give and take process. I believe he is trying to refer to the visible lack of effort.

I seen effort but alot of teachers give up when they can't break the kids into wanting to learn. When i was in school most african american kids could care less about school. The only way to change this is to get the parents to care and pass it on. The rap videos aren't helping either. Glorifing violence and the quick and easy money and rappers telling them they don't need a education besides a street one. Schools can't change this but parents can. I hope it does cause all races in this country are the future of our country. I understand what you guys are saying but I lived through it too and the only way that I cared was my parents pushing me. I don't see this in African American households. I had alot of Black friends and didn't see that push in their house like that of mine.

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Wow, first NSU and now ODU. Our colleges are racking up in the science category this week. This is the type of thing that attracts businesses.

Exactly these are just the things we need to hear!!

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I seen effort but alot of teachers give up when they can't break the kids into wanting to learn. When i was in school most african american kids could care less about school. The only way to change this is to get the parents to care and pass it on. The rap videos aren't helping either. Glorifing violence and the quick and easy money and rappers telling them they don't need a education besides a street one. Schools can't change this but parents can. I hope it does cause all races in this country are the future of our country. I understand what you guys are saying but I lived through it too and the only way that I cared was my parents pushing me. I don't see this in African American households. I had alot of Black friends and didn't see that push in their house like that of mine.

Just for the record, I am African-American... and I do believe the responsibility falls on the parents when it comes down to education. It all starts at home. If you birthed them, you should be the one to instill the educational values in them. Whether you send your kids to public, private, or home school them yourself, if you don't push and encourage it "might" not happen. Culture does play a big part in it as well. Traditionally, African-American homes don't stress education enough (just go to school). I think more emphasis is placed on having a trade. Studies have shown that the Asian community considers education top priority... when was the last time you seen an asian kid flunk out of school (his parents would probably kill him or disown him). As a parent, how can you put your child's future in a stranger's hand. There's an interesting read called "No Excuses: Closing the racial gap in learning" by Abigail Thernstrom. The book goes into depth about this topic. I have 4 kids (ages 11, 10, 6, and 1) and they all go to private school. I prefer private over public because of the Christian environment, smaller classes, attention to detail, and less pressures (peer, social, economical, etc). Eventhough I pay good money for the teachers to instruct my children, its still my responsibility to re-inforce what they've learned and add more to it. :thumbsup:

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