Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

EDPro

Creative Economies, Cool Cities

Recommended Posts

"Creative Economies: Cool Cities", Sept. 21st

The Riley Institute, the Greenville Chamber, and Greenville Forward present a public address by The Honorable Glenda Hood, Florida's Secretary of State and Inaugural Speaker of the Vision 2025 Series.

Glenda Hood has served as Sec. of State since Feb. 2003. In addition to overseeing six divisions of state government, the Secretary of State is Florida's chief elections officer and chief cultural officer. Prior to her appointment as Sec. of State, Glenda Hood served six terms as Mayor of Orlando.

The event will be at 7:30pm at the Gunter Theater at the Peace Center. It is free of charge.

Please rsvp to Kimberly Spencer at [email protected] or 864.294.3253.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


http://www.furman.edu/riley/

I don't know the particulars of who did what for Orlando, but Greenville's annual Inter-Community Visit was to Orlando last year. Specifically to look at the city's relations with Univ. of Central Florida and the region's entrepreneurial infrastructure.

As an aside, did everybody see this about Fort Wayne visiting Greenville...

http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/fortwayne/new...al/12625736.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, EXCELLENT press for Greenville.

As far as the listing of Census Bureau statistics for both Greenville and Ft. Wayne, I'm sure that some Ft. Wayne residents are thinking, "What in the heck can a city of over 200,000 learn from a city of only 56,000?" Maybe a short blurb about SC's restrictive annexation laws would have been quite helpful in that regard, LOL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's an interesting article, indeed.

I just visited Ft. Wayne back in August. Trust me when I say that, although Ft. Wayne has some taller buildings in the CBD, overall it looks and feels a lot smaller than Greenville. My brother-in-law is an engineer with the city of Ft. Wayne, and he took me on a tour of he city. He and my sister and their kids had visited Greenville back in the Spring and they fell in love with our downtown (just as everybody else does). From what he told me, he had mentioned their trip to Greenville to visit us to Ft. Wayne City Councilman Tom Smith (and others) and that the city was planning a trip to Greenville.

The city of Ft. Wayne has some great potential. There are parts of the CBD that are thriving while other parts are ripe for some growth/redevelopment. Headwaters Park North of Downtown is very nice; however, from what my brother-in-law tells me, it's rarely used. It would be a perfect place for events and festivals such as those we have here in Greenville regularly. The Jefferson Point that was mentioned in the article is very similar to our Shops at Greenridge (i.e. it's an outdoor lifestyle center). They have live music there some evenings and weekends just as we do downtown. It's pretty nice.

I posted some photos that I took in Ft. Wayne a while back:

http://www.urbanplanet.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=14911

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This weekend has given me total confirmation of my deep love for Greenville. :wub:

Everyhting from visiting The Shops at Greenridge, to strolling through the Saturday Morning Market on East Court Street and Art in the Park, to enjoying a gut-wrenching Clemson football game with fellow Greenville residents, to experiencing yet another magnificent performance by the very highly esteemed Greenville Symphony Orchestra, to partaking in the always lively late-night downtown crowd at Wild Wing Cafe and Sharkeys Pub. If our visitors aren't left with a tremendously positive impression of our wonderful city and iconic downtown, heaven help the rest of the World -- we're living up the best anyone can offer. :D

Interesting note: Edvard Tchivzel, maestro of the fabulous GSO, is also the conductor of the Fort Wayne Symphony.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That Saturday Morning Market is an absolute gem. We took it in this morning on our way down to Art in the Park. I love it! And...it's even better now that SunTrust has opened their parking on evenings and weekends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would be great if the Saturday market became year round. How fun to bundle up in the winter months and browse the market with hot coffee warming your hands and insides! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would be great if the Saturday market became year round.  How fun to bundle up in the winter months and browse the market with hot coffee warming your hands and insides!    :D

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Or hot cocoa even. Oh yea - I agree 100% ... it would be great to have the Saturday Morning Farmers Market open year-round. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A followup from the Fort Wayne delegation visit.

“The trip really energized the people about what is possible,” said Becker, a member of the delegation and former Greenville resident.

Article from News Sentenial

Great Article from News Sentenial

Read what the visitors say about their time here in Greenville! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did any one go to this thing other than I?

I ask becuase, David Dhi mentined that her had heard from a a professor in virginia who was going to be studying Greenville.

This professor told him he though that Upstate SC, Western NC, and South Western Virginia in the coming years would have more in common that the rest of each's respective states.

Does any one remeber what University that was?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm, that comment about Upstate SC, Western NC, and SW VA is interesting. At this point, it's conceivable that GSP's and Asheville's sprawl will be meeting at some point in the future; what's going on in SW VA to run their sprawl in Western NC's?

Where's StevenRocks when you need him? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm, that comment about Upstate SC, Western NC, and SW VA is interesting. At this point, it's conceivable that GSP's and Asheville's sprawl will be meeting at some point in the future; what's going on in SW VA to run their sprawl in Western NC's?

Where's StevenRocks when you need him? :)

You rang? :P

The thing in my mind that links Upstate South Carolina, Western North Carolina, and Southwest Virginia is the mountains. Mountain culture in the three states is different than the cultures of the other flatter parts of NC, SC, and VA. Mountainous regions have an image of being being backward and that hampers economic development efforts by outsiders in the communities. Greenville is a good example of what happens when local economic development officials try to attract people by shattering people's bad perceptions about mountain towns with progressive actions while showing off the best of mountain culture has to offer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see your point about people viewing mountain towns as "backwards," but I don't consider Greenville a mountain town at all. It is not even close to being a mountain town if you ask me. On a clear day you can see the mountains from here, but that does not make it a mountain town. Asheville is definitely a mountain town, as is Roanoke, VA. Those cities feel a lot more artsy/folksy/outdoorsy than Greenville does. They also seem smaller, more like towns than cities. Lumping Greenville in with mountain towns is incorrect in my opinion.

Besides, Greenville has done quite well in terms of economic development. That alone goes to show you that Greenville is not viewed as a backwards mountain town by others, but rather as a vibrant and enticing city that is on the rise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greenville is becoming more and more progressive in its development plans. Sure, it's not on the level of many large cities, but the ideas are quite solid in the long run. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps Greenville isn't actually located in the mountains, but the city IS located in the foothills, where the mountains begin. I don't think it's a stretch to say that Greenville has been culturally influenced by the mountains in some way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps Greenville isn't actually located in the mountains, but the city IS located in the foothills, where the mountains begin. I don't think it's a stretch to say that Greenville hasn't been culturally influenced by the mountains in some way.

I agree. Have heard the Cliffs people talk about how, externally, they sell their proximity to Asheville, then when a potential buyer visits, they 'wow' them by taking them to Greenville.

Personally, I'd love to see both communities think of themselves more as neigbors.

And I attended the seminar and did hear Dr. Shi mention the study, but I don't remember what university was performing the study. Virginia Tech?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.