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lsgchas

Compromise on Johns Island Waterline

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The two sides disputing the size of the new waterline on Johns Island reached a compromise today. It appears the conservationists won. They forced St. Johns Water Co. to agree to a 24 inch waterline, which will provide only enough water to service the number of homes foreseen in Charleston County's plans. The water company wanted a 30 inch line, which would have provided 56% more water, and would have allowed large scale suburban development on the island.

This was a good compromise for both sides IMO, since it provides a level of surety of what can and can't happen on the island in the near future. It also reinforces the even bigger compromise, the Urban Growth Boundary, which lays out which parts of the island can be developed as an extension of suburbia and which cannot. Although, it's still disturbing to hear developers like Edwin Pearlstine say, "No matter what, Johns Island is going to develop in the future." If he means the part that's been zoned as suburban, that's fine, but it sometimes seems like developers think the whole island is still up for grabs. Thankfully, this compromise will put an end to some of that hubris.

Here's the article: [url="http://www.charleston.net/stories/?newsID=43201

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Now that more water is being distributed to Johns Island, if residential development goes out of control, it will be harder to establish a moratorium for new residential construction if there is plenty of water to go by.

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Now that more water is being distributed to Johns Island, if residential development goes out of control, it will be harder to establish a moratorium for new residential construction if there is plenty of water to go by.

The 24 inch waterline will only bring enough water to Johns Island to service the amount of houses that Charleston Co. has already approved. The size of the waterline itself establishes a built-in cap on the amount of building that can be done there. A 30 inch waterline would have allowed Johns Island to become as suburban as Mt. Pleasant is.

However, once the waterline is in place, all the development that has been stalled because of this fight will suddenly take place. Johns Island will sprout alot of new subdivisions and shopping centers in the next few years.

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If demand increases, additional waterlines might be built. Remember, St. Johns basically runs from CPW, and CPW could build additional waterlines if needed. However, you make a great point in that development will start sprouting quickly on the island. Once the developments are completed, more people may start pushing to get the last leg of the Mark Clark built.

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If demand increases, additional waterlines might be built. Remember, St. Johns basically runs from CPW, and CPW could build additional waterlines if needed. However, you make a great point in that development will start sprouting quickly on the island. Once the developments are completed, more people may start pushing to get the last leg of the Mark Clark built.

I think the spirit of the compromise is that this waterline is it for now. This waterline is supposed to service all the houses and businesses that could be potentially built under the county's zoning plans. For another waterline to be built, those zoning plans would have to be overturn (and pretty much the whole idea of a greenbelt abandoned). I don't think that'll happen any time soon.

However, I think you're right that supporters of the Mark Clark extension will use the waterline to bolster their case.

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