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Mith242

Growth and it's results in Northwest Arkansas.

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Just thought I'd throw out some questions and see what people think. Northwest Arkansas has always seemed a bit apart from the rest of the state. If it wasn't for the statewide support of the Razorbacks, you'd wonder if there would be an even bigger divide. But with all the development and all of people moving in from out of state, does anyone wonder what effects this will have on the local culture? Northwest Arkansas is already the lest 'southern' area culturally in the state. Will this simply re-emphasize this or bring about a bigger divide from this area of the state and the rest of Arkansas? Does anyone wonder if all of this growth will change the local culture and how so? I seem to remember Arkansawyer mentioning something about this in another topic a while back ago. Now that we have some others from northwest Arkansas on here I was curious to see some opinions.

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Just thought I'd throw out some questions and see what people think. Northwest Arkansas has always seemed a bit apart from the rest of the state. If it wasn't for the statewide support of the Razorbacks, you'd wonder if there would be an even bigger divide. But with all the development and all of people moving in from out of state, does anyone wonder what effects this will have on the local culture? Northwest Arkansas is already the lest 'southern' area culturally in the state. Will this simply re-emphasize this or bring about a bigger divide from this area of the state and the rest of Arkansas? Does anyone wonder if all of this growth will change the local culture and how so? I seem to remember Arkansawyer mentioning something about this in another topic a while back ago. Now that we have some others from northwest Arkansas on here I was curious to see some opinions.

Since I was growing up in the 80s, it most definitely already has changed. NWA was always less Southern than, say, the Delta which is as Southern as any area. However, it has certainly lost some of that and become less so because of the immigration of Northerners and Hispanics to the area. I can't put my finger on why it is but the culture is definitely different. It reminds me more of KC than Nashville or Birmingham.

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I think that this growth will change the culture of Northwest Arkansas. Currently, I see hardly no culture in Northwest Arkansas, but if people from the west and the north continue to move into the area, look out to seeing more of a northern feel in the area. Personally, Northwest Arkansas has never really been looked about history wise. If it has been, it has been sporadic, and with things going different in all parts of the area, it just seems like a big suburb.

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This is definately an interesting topic. I've lived in NWark my entire life and I'm a young adult so I kind of have an interesting perspective.

I remember when I was younger. I heard somebody speaking Spanish and I was amazed because I'd never heard anybody speak it before in person. That has certainly changed, I don't go a day without hearing Spanish now. But that's mainly because I work just down the hallway from the HR office of my company.

I think the area is certainly culturally different, and not just from the hispanic influence. I remember a few months ago my family and I were eating at Fred's Hickoy Inn in Bentonville/Bellavista. My dad all of a sudden said, "Listen to the people in here, none of them are from around here." I stopped and listened and sure enough. I heard accents that sounded very Chicago-ish and some from other areas.

I think Fayetteville has retained much of its original country charm. Sure, if you go to the north part of town, it looks nothing like it did even 10 years ago. But the town still has that same feel to it. At least it does to me. I think even the younger generation coming out of college isn't that much different than before.

As far as feeling separated from the rest of the state. Yes, I think we do feel that way. I remember seeing statistics somewhere that Arkansas had something like the 2nd worst schools in the nation. Then I remember seeing another that the schools in NWA where in the top 10%. It's funny to look at bad statistics about your state and look around and everything is going great.

Sometimes I almost feel like we're dragging the rest of the state along...like if it weren't for us, Arkansas would be dead last in everything.

I'm not saying the rest of the state just sucks. I like Little Rock a lot, as well as Hot Springs, and several other places. But I've never even been to anywhere in SE Ark. And I don't really want to go.

My grandparents live in Forrest City. Thinking back on it, the part of FC that my grandparents live is much like Fayetteville. Hills and everything. But culturally it's much different.

Accents are kind of funny, too. I don't think people from NWark really have much of an accent compared to the rest of the state.

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As far as accents go, northwest Arkansas seems to have been more influenced by being closer to the midwest. Although if you leave the flat areas of northwest Arkansas and go into the hills of the Ozarks the accent suddenly changes to something more like the Appalachias. Most of the people I hear with stronger southern accents tend to be transplants from other areas of Arkansas.

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Just to throw some more ideas and questions out there on this topic. Does anyone think this area will in some ways become a little similar to say something like southern Florida. An area that has had so many people from outside the region move in that it has pretty much lost most of it's 'southern' culture? For that matter does anyone think it will have much on an impact on the rest of the state and how northwest Arkansas interacts with the rest of the state? I know there is already some friction between say northwest Arkansas and southeast Arkansas. Mainly over funds, but I have gotten the impression this area of the state isn't always looked upon favorably by people in that area of the state. Just wondered if anyone thought people from the rest of Arkansas would see people from northwest Arkansas as 'true' Arkansans (or Arkansawyers). I have wondered if the area might be looked upon differently it the university and the Razorbacks weren't here. In some ways they seem to help tie us to the rest of the state.

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Just to throw some more ideas and questions out there on this topic. Does anyone think this area will in some ways become a little similar to say something like southern Florida. An area that has had so many people from outside the region move in that it has pretty much lost most of it's 'southern' culture? For that matter does anyone think it will have much on an impact on the rest of the state and how northwest Arkansas interacts with the rest of the state? I know there is already some friction between say northwest Arkansas and southeast Arkansas. Mainly over funds, but I have gotten the impression this area of the state isn't always looked upon favorably by people in that area of the state. Just wondered if anyone thought people from the rest of Arkansas would see people from northwest Arkansas as 'true' Arkansans (or Arkansawyers). I have wondered if the area might be looked upon differently it the university and the Razorbacks weren't here. In some ways they seem to help tie us to the rest of the state.

I could see that area becoming like a Kansas City. The Midwestern and Northeastern cultures seems to dominate at least in Bentonville and Rogers. Also with a hint of West-coast, due to the growing number of hispanics and Californians moving to the area.

I talked to a guy in Little Rock, and he said that being in Northwest Arkansas made him feel like he was in the Midwest. I certainly think that a lot of Arkansans think of us in that perspective.

Any of you other guys from Little Rock percieve us Northwest Arkansans as being different?

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I could see that area becoming like a Kansas City. The Midwestern and Northeastern cultures seems to dominate at least in Bentonville and Rogers. Also with a hint of West-coast, due to the growing number of hispanics and Californians moving to the area.

I talked to a guy in Little Rock, and he said that being in Northwest Arkansas made him feel like he was in the Midwest. I certainly think that a lot of Arkansans think of us in that perspective.

Any of you other guys from Little Rock percieve us Northwest Arkansans as being different?

Northwest Arkansas is now different from the rest of the state because it has been overrun by outsiders. It's as simple as that. The landscape, history, etc. are not things that make it feel different. Consider that in 1990 Bentonville had about 11,000 people, similar to the population of cities such as Magnolia, Camden, and Hope, but now has close to 30,000 people. That overwhelming growth doesn't mix or adapt to a local culture, it simply makes a new one.

What's interesting is that the population there now consists of those who have been raised either in Northwest Arkansas before the explosive growth, or is part of the growth itself. In Fayetteville, I either hear the Southern accents of most natives, or hear the mostly yankee accents of newcomers. I've mentioned it before, but the people I know from Northwest Arkansas before it was booming have very Southern accents, similar to those in Southern Appalachia. Traveling to neighboring rural counties, one still hears this accent.

Unfortunately, the culture of the old Northwest Arkansas will continue to diminish as it becomes more like the culture of the places where the transplants are from. This phenomenon is nothing unheard of; cities all across the Southeast have been, and are being, transformed by growth from the North.

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Northwest Arkansas is now different from the rest of the state because it has been overrun by outsiders. It's as simple as that. The landscape, history, etc. are not things that make it feel different. Consider that in 1990 Bentonville had about 11,000 people, similar to the population of cities such as Magnolia, Camden, and Hope, but now has close to 30,000 people. That overwhelming growth doesn't mix or adapt to a local culture, it simply makes a new one.

What's interesting is that the population there now consists of those who have been raised either in Northwest Arkansas before the explosive growth, or is part of the growth itself. In Fayetteville, I either hear the Southern accents of most natives, or hear the mostly yankee accents of newcomers. I've mentioned it before, but the people I know from Northwest Arkansas before it was booming have very Southern accents, similar to those in Southern Appalachia. Traveling to neighboring rural counties, one still hears this accent.

Unfortunately, the culture of the old Northwest Arkansas will continue to diminish as it becomes more like the culture of the places where the transplants are from. This phenomenon is nothing unheard of; cities all across the Southeast have been, and are being, transformed by growth from the North.

As far as southern accents to those 'oldtimers' who were here before the boom. I think it depended on what area of northwest Arkansas they were from or raised. I know a number of people who were born and raised here. People who were closer to the hills or mountainous areas have strong accents similar to those in the Appalachias. But the ones who lived in the flatter areas, still have a bit of a southern accent but it's tempered with a midwestern influence. But overall I think there has been a process going on here in northwest Arkansas for quite a while. I think pre-1960's few people moved into the area. It was more likely that people would move out of the area. It seemed in the 60's that people started slowly moving into the area. Of course back then it was mainly people from the surrounding areas. People from the more rural parts of the nearby Ozarks where there weren't many jobs. Also maybe some people from other parts of the state and even some people who lived close to the border on the Oklahoma and Missouri side. Many cities in the 'south' have had large numbers of peop,e outside the region move in but they also had a large population to start of with. Northwest Arkansas didn't have a very large population in the beginning, perhaps more similar to south Florida at the beginning of the 1900's. I imagine Little Rock could also start having more of this problem as it becomes more known. But since it already had a decent sized population already there it might better hold onto it's 'native' culture. But I don't think northwest Arkansas was ever quite as 'southern' as most of the state is so I think this is going to re-emphasize it.

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I thought I'd add some more comments to this topic. I think some of our northwest Arkansas forumers might be originally from out of state so I hope they don't feel that they are being picked on. Honestly I think most people in northwest Arkansas have embraced the changes that have occured. Sure there are some negative aspects to such a huge surge in population from out of state but there are good aspects to it too. First of all northwest Arkansas was traditionally 95% white and you could probably bump that up to 99% if you took out Fayetteville. Granted there's still not a huge amount of ethnic diversity but it's getting better. But there are some positives aspects to it. Ironically I've found out that many of the Californians that have moved into the Fayetteville actually do have some ties to Arkansas. I've met quite a few that are descendants of many of the Arkies who left during the dust bowl days and went to California. Obviously they were raised somewhere else and are culturally different, but I still find that interesting. But anyway I don't think I've ever heard any of this come up in conversation of have heard people being concerned about any of this here in northwest Arkansas. Maybe we can get some of our northwest Arkansas forumers who are originally from out of state to comment whether they have had problems 'fitting in' or have felt that they were not welcome to the area.

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I thought I'd add some more comments to this topic. I think some of our northwest Arkansas forumers might be originally from out of state so I hope they don't feel that they are being picked on. Honestly I think most people in northwest Arkansas have embraced the changes that have occured. Sure there are some negative aspects to such a huge surge in population from out of state but there are good aspects to it too. First of all northwest Arkansas was traditionally 95% white and you could probably bump that up to 99% if you took out Fayetteville. Granted there's still not a huge amount of ethnic diversity but it's getting better. But there are some positives aspects to it. Ironically I've found out that many of the Californians that have moved into the Fayetteville actually do have some ties to Arkansas. I've met quite a few that are descendants of many of the Arkies who left during the dust bowl days and went to California. Obviously they were raised somewhere else and are culturally different, but I still find that interesting. But anyway I don't think I've ever heard any of this come up in conversation of have heard people being concerned about any of this here in northwest Arkansas. Maybe we can get some of our northwest Arkansas forumers who are originally from out of state to comment whether they have had problems 'fitting in' or have felt that they were not welcome to the area.

I've live in Northwest Arkansas all my life, and I embrace the changes that have occured, and one's in the future.

I think that are part of the state does have a little trouble fitting in with the rest of the state, simply due to ethnic and cultural ties. We seem more mid-western than southern if you ask me.

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I've live in Northwest Arkansas all my life, and I embrace the changes that have occured, and one's in the future.

I think that are part of the state does have a little trouble fitting in with the rest of the state, simply due to ethnic and cultural ties. We seem more mid-western than southern if you ask me.

I really think we'd have much more a midwestern feel if we hadn't been a part of Arkansas. I think it's one of the few things giving northwest Arkansas some of it's 'southern' feel. If this little corner of the state had been a part of say Missouri or Oklahoma then I think we'd really be much more midwestern.

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I've live in Northwest Arkansas all my life, and I embrace the changes that have occured, and one's in the future.

I think that are part of the state does have a little trouble fitting in with the rest of the state, simply due to ethnic and cultural ties. We seem more mid-western than southern if you ask me.

I really think we'd have much more a midwestern feel if we hadn't been a part of Arkansas. I think it's one of the few things giving northwest Arkansas some of it's 'southern' feel. If this little corner of the state had been a part of say Missouri or Oklahoma then I think we'd really be much more midwestern.

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I really think we'd have much more a midwestern feel if we hadn't been a part of Arkansas. I think it's one of the few things giving northwest Arkansas some of it's 'southern' feel. If this little corner of the state had been a part of say Missouri or Oklahoma then I think we'd really be much more midwestern.

Totally agree. With the connotation of Arkansas, people tend to think "southern" and therefore it is portraid as southern.

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Totally agree. With the connotation of Arkansas, people tend to think "southern" and therefore it is portraid as southern.

Yes and for the most part it's true. You really only have a small section in this corner of the state that doesn't have as much of a 'southern' feel to it as the rest of the state. I even think that the rest of the Ozarks in Arkansas have more of a 'southern' feel to it than extreme northwest Arkansas. Maybe this has something also to do with the fact that I hear Fayetteville compared to western cities for some reason.

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Yes and for the most part it's true. You really only have a small section in this corner of the state that doesn't have as much of a 'southern' feel to it as the rest of the state. I even think that the rest of the Ozarks in Arkansas have more of a 'southern' feel to it than extreme northwest Arkansas. Maybe this has something also to do with the fact that I hear Fayetteville compared to western cities for some reason.

Probably, especially with all the Californians moving to the area.

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Probably, especially with all the Californians moving to the area.

I'm not really sure if it's that. But I've heard a number of people compare Fayetteville to Flagstaff, AZ; Santa Fe, NM; and even a small Abuquerque, NM. Seems a bit odd, although I have actually visited these cities and I can see some comparisons. But I'm still a bit surprised to hear people mention it though.

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I'm not really sure if it's that. But I've heard a number of people compare Fayetteville to Flagstaff, AZ; Santa Fe, NM; and even a small Abuquerque, NM. Seems a bit odd, although I have actually visited these cities and I can see some comparisons. But I'm still a bit surprised to hear people mention it though.

Fayetteville does seem like a Santa Fe.

I have heard in mentioned from a lot of people as well as on this forum.

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Fayetteville does seem like a Santa Fe.

I have heard in mentioned from a lot of people as well as on this forum.

Yeah I can see similarities, although they may not look the same and have different histories. They both have strict building codes and both are known for having controversy over city decisions. They're also both about the same size.

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Yeah I can see similarities, although they may not look the same and have different histories. They both have strict building codes and both are known for having controversy over city decisions. They're also both about the same size.

What are some of the strict building codes?

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What are some of the strict building codes?

In Fayetteville? There's a sign ordinance that has run off several restaurants. They city council is also known for being picky before approving a building permit. Generally they have to think any building is aesthetically pleasing. I know some businesses have had to try several times to finally get their building permits passed before the city council. There's also something of a hillside ordinance. You can't simply just bulldoze the land flat to make is more suitable for development. There's also the well known tree ordinance. You have to preserve a certain amount of the trees on your land during construction. They accidentally knocked over a tree in the Nelson's Crossing development and now they have to spend several thousands of dollars planting more trees now just for that one tree. Things like that basically. As far as Santa Fe is concerned they are also rather well know for being picky about a building's appearance. Everything there has to have an adobe appearance to preserve the look of the whole city. I think you also can't build above four or five stories. There could be more about Santa Fe that I don't know about, but you get the gist.

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In Fayetteville? There's a sign ordinance that has run off several restaurants. They city council is also known for being picky before approving a building permit. Generally they have to think any building is aesthetically pleasing. I know some businesses have had to try several times to finally get their building permits passed before the city council. There's also something of a hillside ordinance. You can't simply just bulldoze the land flat to make is more suitable for development. There's also the well known tree ordinance. You have to preserve a certain amount of the trees on your land during construction. They accidentally knocked over a tree in the Nelson's Crossing development and now they have to spend several thousands of dollars planting more trees now just for that one tree. Things like that basically. As far as Santa Fe is concerned they are also rather well know for being picky about a building's appearance. Everything there has to have an adobe appearance to preserve the look of the whole city. I think you also can't build above four or five stories. There could be more about Santa Fe that I don't know about, but you get the gist.

Wow, I hope they don't put a limit on building size in Fayetteville. But some of those ordinace make Fayetteville a great place.

I am somewhat envious of Fayetteville, because they are thinking of the future.

Do you guys have a silt ordinance. At every construction site in Rogers, you have to have these silt barriers to hold back any erosion that may result from constrution. Recently the Pinnacle Group was fined $4,000 for not having these up properly. It could be a state mandated law, but I'm not sure.

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Wow, I hope they don't put a limit on building size in Fayetteville. But some of those ordinace make Fayetteville a great place.

I am somewhat envious of Fayetteville, because they are thinking of the future.

Do you guys have a silt ordinance. At every construction site in Rogers, you have to have these silt barriers to hold back any erosion that may result from constrution. Recently the Pinnacle Group was fined $4,000 for not having these up properly. It could be a state mandated law, but I'm not sure.

I'm not positive about the silt ordinance but I wouldn't be surprised. I would imagine they do, they don't have any problems implamenting ideas that other cities have made. But I do agree with you that I think that these restrictions will help the city in the long run. But it does make quite a few people somewhat angry down here. I think some people think that Fayetteville gave up and much of the growth going on in Rogers could or should have been happening in Fayetteville. Although I can't agree with that. Wal-mart is driving much of the growth there in Benton County and even if Fayetteville was much less strict I still think more growth would be happening there in Benton County.

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Fayetteville does seem like a Santa Fe.

I have heard in mentioned from a lot of people as well as on this forum.

I don't see it. One's pure tourism and a resort town, the other a college town.

Then there's the cost of living well above the rest of New Mexico, then there's the massive homosexual population. If anything Santa Fe is more like Hot Springs but even that's a stretch.

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I don't see it. One's pure tourism and a resort town, the other a college town.

Then there's the cost of living well above the rest of New Mexico, then there's the massive homosexual population. If anything Santa Fe is more like Hot Springs but even that's a stretch.

Yes that's true, there certainly are differences as you pointed out. But I have heard people make comparisons between Santa Fe and Fayetteville. But I imagine most people are probably referring to building codes and such. I guess you could also point out other differences. Santa Fe is much more historical, being established in 1609. Santa Fe has it's fair share of Californians like Fayetteville, but there's also a number of people originating from the east coast in Santa Fe also. Santa Fe is also the capital of New Mexico. But the reason I brought up the subject in the first place is that I have heard a number of people compare Fayetteville to western cities. I'm not sure of why that is. I'm not sure if many people don't consider Fayetteville much of a 'southern' city or what it is. Although I have heard Fayetteville mentioned as a small Austin also. I believe you've commented to that somewhere on here also. So I guess Fayetteville in many ways actually is unique and isn't necessarily easily compared to other cities no matter where they are.

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