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jaredw

GM Lansing Car Assembly Plant

GM Lansing Car Assembly Plant  

14 members have voted

  1. 1. What should replace it?

    • Owner Occupied Homes
      3
    • Condominium Development
      2
    • Office Park
      1
    • Theme Park / Go Cart Track
      1
    • Neighborhood Similar to East Village
      4
    • Other
      3


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What do you think should be built in place of the Lansing Car Assembly plant?

Lansing Car Assembly is split into two sites: A 74-acre parcel of land off Verlinden Avenue and a 188-acre plot off Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

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I think both parcels whould be mixed-use. That is a must, in my book. But, the scale should be different.

The MLK site is just ripe for potential high-rise/mid-rise residential, with plenty of shopping, perhaps even a small Eastwood-type mall, but much more urban, and PLENTY of entertainment options. The riverfront should include a promenade. Since this is right off the high-way, this could in fact be a southern extension of downtown, something I never thought I'd see in my lifetime.

The Verliden site should be on a much smaller scale, and be dedicated to smaller businesses and neighborhood shops, with plent of affordable single-family housing to fit into the current neighborhood. I also like Virg Bernero's idea of using part of the site for market-rate, but senior-citizens, housing. But, housing is key. This area needs to feed the schools in the area, perhaps offsetting the loss the district has seen in students. Lansing needs to be made attractive to many more families again.

I can't believe how big this is going to be. I never put much thought into it before, but such large parcels just opening up could mean HUGE things for Lansing's future. This is bigger than anything that could happen downtown.

BTW, if anyone wants to send the planning department ideas, just write the head of planning, Jim Ruff at [email protected]

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I agree with your assessment. So I take it from what you've said that you are using "East Village" in the sense of the planned EL development, not the smaller, currently-building Lansing neighborhood?

What might be some similarities or differences between that development area and this one? Thoughts?

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Yes, that is what I was thinking, because this is right on the river just like the East Lansing East Village developments.

Similar to this: EastVillage1.jpg

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Yes, that is what I was thinking, because this is right on the river just like the East Lansing East Village developments.

Similar to this: EastVillage1.jpg

If an area like this was ever built, I would plant myself in Lansing and never look back. This is the EXACT sort of opportunity that Lansing needs to bring people back. I just hope that it does not sit around for months or years waiting for something to happen. I've seen all too often in Michigan's Big 3 cities plans that work well, but never end up happening because of politics.

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This is the EXACT sort of opportunity that Lansing needs to bring people back.

I agree.

I would like to see something like West Village in Lansing, but within that entire area. Make it green and walkable and put in good recreational amentities. Also, I love the East Village idea of having a dock and more river orientation. When the Great Lakes are cleaned up, the watersheds will get cleaned up, that is, over time. When they take out the dam by the Brenke fish ladder, it is believed that alone will oxygenate the water and replace some of the bottomfeeders.

One thing I always like to see is more roof usage. Why do so few buildings, particularly residential ones, restrict the roof so much? I have seen some nice ideas such as gardens, bars, screened fences, etc., some in Lansing.

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The Brenke Fish Ladder and dam demoltion has been put on hold, and likely won't happen. They aren't even considering testing rising and lowering water until next year. I hope they don't tear it down. It would lower the river through downtown by something like 6' messing up everything already built up to the river.

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It would lower the river through downtown by something like 6' messing up everything already built up to the river.

Would there be too much erosion? What would be sacrificed? If it will make the water look healthy and not smell so bad, I am for it.

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Do you realize how much is built right on the river? Imagine the effect on the Riverfront promenade behind the Lansing Center. Imagine the boat launches at Riverfront and Cherry Hill Park the same. The river doesn't need to be any smaller, especially through downtown.

Also, I don't know what you mean by the Grand River smells. If anything smells or is dirty it's the Red Cedar River. This is far to drastic a change. Maybe a good compromise would be to somehow lower the the dam just a little bit instead of entirely tearing it down.

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I run, walk, or bike on the river trail two to three times a week, and I always notice a smell. My understanding has long been that due to low oxygen levels, select vegetation and wildlife can exist.

The effect to me still seems minimal. If anything, it allows for expansion on the area behind the Lansing Center, and the boat launches can be replaced. You are right though, raising and lowering will be the best test.

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I'm surprised so many voted for a neighborhood similar to East Village. IMO, apart from the condos closer to Saginaw Street, the whole layout and design of the neighborhood is very suburban. I really wouldn't want to see that. They didn't even follow the street grid of the city making it feel very walled off with one two entrances/exists off of Saginaw.

I hope if a neighborhood is built, it will continue the street grid. If you want a suburban neighborhood, move to the suburbs, don't try and recreate it in the city. People move to the city because it offers and alternative to the suburbs, not because it tries to recreate them.

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The only problem with the 'east village' concept is that the CN has both yards and their mainline between the site and the river. Which really puts a hamper on connecting the development to the river.

And before someone says 'we can just move it...' tell me how your going to pay for building a new class A double line, and where your going to move it to.

Likely the best option is a mixed use development on part and a small buisness/light industrial area next to the Grand River Assembly plant.

(One problem with most mixed use/mixed income developments is their tendency to ignore how to relate modern industry to their typical mixed of residential and commerical properties.)

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You have a point at this particular site, but the whole point of mixed use is to displace and move industry to more appropriate parts of the city in most cases, where most industry has already relocated, anyway.

BTW, I drove by Lansing Assembly tonight over the MLK bridge, and the thing looked down-right spooky. I've always been so use to seeing it lit, and with all of the lights turned out, it was a ominous gateway into downtown.

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