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GRDadof3

What is Great About West Michigan

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GRDadof3    1826

Here's an opportunity for us to showcase what is GREAT about West Michigan and the Grand Rapids area especially. Some of the things that come to mind:

> Low cost of living compared to other Northeastern and Midwestern Cities,

> Relatively good traffic, with very few traffic jams except when accidents occur,

> More diversified industry than our counterparts in the Northeast and Midwest,

> If you must live in the suburbs, you're still only 15 - 20 minutes from downtown and most of the metro,

> Quality-built housing stock, unlike many of the rapidly growing Southern and Southwestern States,

> Billions of dollars invested and to be invested in our downtown, and not all relegated to residential

projects, but future permanent job growth.

> Minutes from some of the most beautiful natural resources and outdoor activities on the planet, especially

Lake Michigan and the thousands of natural inland lakes, rivers and streams,

> A downtown and nearby neighborhoods rich in history, architecture and cultural activities,

> Great school systems, despite the negative local news media,

> An entrepreneurial business spirit, with thousands of jobs being created in the small business sector,

> A large philanthropic community with dozens of BIG-TIME contributors to the community,

Not bad for a metro of only 600 - 700,000! I could list many more, but I don't want to hog the stage. Ahhh! I feel better already :D

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zenstyle    3

My $20's worth:

1. The influx of new people: new outlooks, new attitudes, new paradigms.

2. Pretty scenery

3. Lake Michigan, Lake Michigan, Lake Michigan!

4. The abundance of woman-owned and operated businesses of all sizes. That's where I choose to spend my money.

5. "Green-building" has got a nice big fat foot-hold here. Cool, daddy-oh !

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d59    0

The city of Grand Rapids is so accessible, and it has many of the amenities of larger urban areas without the crime and filth. There is so much

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Prankster    29

Here's an opportunity for us to showcase what is GREAT about West Michigan and the Grand Rapids area especially. Some of the things that come to mind:

> Quality-built housing stock, unlike many of the rapidly growing Southern and Southwestern States,

Especially with those Eastbrook Builders houses out there. :thumbsup:

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PBJ    0

I'll add that you have access to most of the major state universities from thier local downtown campuses (or suburban campuses in 1 case). Add to that the fact that GVSU is one of the fastest both in recognition and size schools in the state. GVSU helps bring a lot of "younger" people from around the state to the area, many of which end up staying after graduation. :thumbsup:

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MJLO    340

I agree, the bringing of young educated minds to the area, thru a major university among other things, will really help our economy for years to come, it is things like that, that young thriving companies look for when relocating to an area. Add to that all the investment and construction going on downtown, and the life science industry will play a massive roll in our future!

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torgo    3

I agree, the bringing of young educated minds to the area, thru a major university among other things, will really help our economy for years to come, it is things like that, that young thriving companies look for when relocating to an area. Add to that all the investment and construction going on downtown, and the life science industry will play a massive roll in our future!

Whats great about GR? Hmmm...

Good reputation, unlike that of Flint, Saginaw, Detroit, etc.

Investment in downtown.

Big enough for big-city feel. Small enough that you still feel comfortable.

GR never sold its soul to the auto industry

Young, educated, innovative people can get started here without going broke because real-estate prices here are very reasonable, especially when compared to other growing areas of the country.

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MJLO    340

I can say, that after spending the weekend in Detroits Inner Ring suburbs, I was so depressed, and could not wait to get back to Grand Rapids! As I was driving home and passed the sign that said, 28th st. I thought to myself, oh thank you Jesus I'm home! Grand Rapids is my Favorite city by far, although I have a deep love for Detroit, when you have to spend the weekend in Roseville, pack prozac, the post ww2 developement is a real downer. Although a big part of that may have been the fact that the reason I was in Roseville, was for my ex girlfriends wedding.

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torgo    3

The People!

This is definitely true. A lot of cities seem to have an elitist smugness or snobbery to them. GR doesn't seem to have this problem. Heck, even GR suburbanites are better than the ones in Detroit (present company excluded, of course ;) ) and many other big cities. People are nice here, and they'll talk to you just for gits and shiggles.

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I think what stands out about GR is how it has been able to maintain such a low crime rate relative to other areas of the state. That is probably related to its more diversified economic base which offered better opportunities....like Ann Arbor.

Other than that.....the Lake Shore, the New Millenium Park (thats awsome). I would not say "THE PEOPLE" however....thats a definite NOT!

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GRDadof3    1826

I would not say "THE PEOPLE" however....thats a definite NOT!

Nice <_< What are we, potted plants? At least we know from where you're coming..

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GRDadof3    1826

I would sum it up into two categories: "complete stranger encounter" and the "neighbor, friend, co-worker" relationship.

I find that when coming into contact with complete strangers, be it grocery stores, gas stations, passing on the street, in a company meeting setting, etc.., that people here are much friendlier than other places that I have spent a considerable amount of time (not visiting as a tourist). I think it has more to do with the slower pace of life here, as opposed to perceived morality or religious beliefs. Especially people whom I've had contact with in the suburban Detroit and Chicago area. Words I use to describe people I have met are "arrogant, pushy, know-it-alls, Type A, obnoxious, rude". Need I say more. I believe they can't help it, because that is the environment in which they live. The pressure in those cities is tremendous to "out-do" each other in every aspect of life. I don't find that quite as much here.

In fact, I just had to run to Meijer before picking up my dauther, and TWO SEPARATE people in two different aisles struck up a discussion with me regarding what they were shopping for, and even pointed out to me what was on sale. :shok: It suprises me every time. I did not initiate either time. And they didn't even pitch Amway to me :P

As far as neighbors, friends, co-workers, I have found a genuine interest in how I am doing personally and as a family from pretty much everyone I am surrounded by. Not a shallow feeling of pretending to be concerned about me.

But that's my world. If you smile, the world smiles back at you. Maybe I have not lived in those other areas long enough to find out.

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I would sum it up into two categories: "complete stranger encounter" and the "neighbor, friend, co-worker" relationship.

I find that when coming into contact with complete strangers, be it grocery stores, gas stations, passing on the street, in a company meeting setting, etc.., that people here are much friendlier than other places that I have spent a considerable amount of time (not visiting as a tourist). I think it has more to do with the slower pace of life here, as opposed to perceived morality or religious beliefs. Especially people whom I've had contact with in the suburban Detroit and Chicago area. Words I use to describe people I have met are "arrogant, pushy, know-it-alls, Type A, obnoxious, rude". Need I say more. I believe they can't help it, because that is the environment in which they live. The pressure in those cities is tremendous to "out-do" each other in every aspect of life. I don't find that quite as much here.

In fact, I just had to run to Meijer before picking up my dauther, and TWO SEPARATE people in two different aisles struck up a discussion with me regarding what they were shopping for, and even pointed out to me what was on sale. :shok: It suprises me every time. I did not initiate either time. And they didn't even pitch Amway to me :P

As far as neighbors, friends, co-workers, I have found a genuine interest in how I am doing personally and as a family from pretty much everyone I am surrounded by. Not a shallow feeling of pretending to be concerned about me.

But that's my world. If you smile, the world smiles back at you. Maybe I have not lived in those other areas long enough to find out.

Well....all that having been said...and I am sure that it is true....that does not make the

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Aren't we just splitting hairs at this point? Good grief.

NO....I believe that people should say what they mean and mean what they say. I would like to be able to take the literal interpretation of what a person says instead of the ambiguity of context and reading between the lines. Moreover, I bet that there are more than a few people who WANT to believe that the NATURE of people in West Michigan is somehow better than people in other places, in which case using "PEOPLE" would be apropos for such an argument....although erroneous.

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torgo    3

NO....I believe that people should say what they mean and mean what they say. I would like to be able to take the literal interpretation of what a person says instead of the ambiguity of context and reading between the lines. Moreover, I bet that there are more than a few people who WANT to believe that the NATURE of people in West Michigan is somehow better than people in other places, in which case using "PEOPLE" would be apropos for such an argument....although erroneous.

grdad said "the people" are what's great about west michigan. Why? Because the people are nice and show genuine concern about thier fellow citizens. Seems pretty simple. But, then again, I'm just a simple guy :D

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GRDadof3    1826

In that case, you're right. It's the environment in which we live here that creates more personable relationships and interactions. I think humans are inherently good everywhere, and become either good or bad through the environment around them and the decisions they make. But to say "What is Great About West Michigan", I would say the people that are created by the local environment are good people. And it can probably be said about many metro areas of comparable size and disposition.

And for andy's sake, I'll now go back to cutting jokes about Moch (or some other silly activity) :P

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torgo    3

And for andy's sake, I'll now go back to cutting jokes about Moch (or some other silly activity) :P

:D Time for a beer! :alc:

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allbusiness    0

Continuing with the hair-splitting...I'll argue that while people are certainly impacted by their environment, we also have the greatest ability to ALTER our environment and therefore change how it impacts us. Is it not a tenet of our beliefs as free citizens that people CREATE the envoronment in which they live and can change those elements of it that are in their control?

Arguing that the people here are simply a product of their environment does not tell the whole story.

No, I'm not a sociologist, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

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GRDadof3    1826

No, I'm not a sociologist, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

:lol: "I'm not a Sociologist, but I play one on TV"

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Continuing with the hair-splitting...I'll argue that while people are certainly impacted by their environment, we also have the greatest ability to ALTER our environment and therefore change how it impacts us. Is it not a tenet of our beliefs as free citizens that people CREATE the envoronment in which they live and can change those elements of it that are in their control?

Arguing that the people here are simply a product of their environment does not tell the whole story.

No, I'm not a sociologist, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

Hey...no fair...you stole my line :D . I think that GRDAD got it right. It is population dynamics that shape environment and behaviorisms of metropolitan areas, along with economic opportunities, if I may add. Certainly most studies show that when animals are crowded together...it breeds more tension and animosity. We need not forget that we too are animals, but with a greater cognitive nature.

It

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