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AceMentor

Can Nashville Compete

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I've been viewing on other forums that cities like Charlotte and Jacksonville are Pumping up their skylines with huge buildings. (40+ Storeys). All Nashville has is The Signature Tower and the Viridian plus a few medium sized towers. Will Nashville Be able to keep up or will it be left in the dust?

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I've been viewing on other forums that cities like Charlotte and Jacksonville are Pumping up their skylines with huge buildings. (40+ Storeys). All Nashville has is The Signature Tower and the Viridian plus a few medium sized towers. Will Nashville Be able to keep up or will it be left in the dust?

the real question is, can charlotte and jacksonville sustain all of those buildings? i think nashville is playing is smart and growing where they need to.

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A major factor in the comparative lack of growth in the Central Business district is the massive amount of office park building going on in Maryland Farms, and Cools Springs. As we all have heard, Nashville has become one of the top cities for corporate relocations. Problem is that nearly all those relocations are going out to the suburbs. Imagine what the Nashville CBD would look like today if all that office construction out in Williamson county had happed downtown!

The building of residential complexes in the CBD in Nashville is in its infancy, and is probably behind what has already happened in Charlotte and Jacksonville. However, I expect this move to downtown living is going to accelerate rapidly. The high cost of gas will aid in this... making the suburban lifestyle with its long commutes to work less and less desirable. Once more and more options are made available for living in and near downtown, I think you will begin to see a renaissance in the building of office towers there as well.

Many of the complexes which now are being built in the suburbs will once again be built in downtown. Then the more office towers are built downtown, the more Apartment and Condo towers will be built there as well. It will be a snowball effect.

I guess what this all means is that I expect the same things that are currently happening in Charlotte and Jacksonville to also happen in Nashville. Nashville may be a little behind them now because it may be a little further behind in the move to more urban living. However, it is happening and beginning to snowball in Nashville, and the building of more and larger structures downtown is, IMO, almost inevitable!

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I don't think the lack of 30-40 story skyscrapers in downtown Nashville means a whole heck of alot. As someone has already pointed out, Nashville is one of the top cities for locating corporate offices in, so its not like the city isn't being competative for those sorts of jobs. One of the reasons the city is so attractive is that it offers office space all over the city, alot of that being near the nice burbs on the fringe of the city where alot of those workers are going to want to live.

As far as building tall structures, Nashville is doing quite well IMO. I mean every week we read and hear about new projects that are going to go up in the city that are going to greatly effect the urban quality of the city. They aren't all 30-40 story projects, nor all they all in the CBD, but they are all substantial. In the long run the midrise residential and office towers being built in the CBD, Gulch, and West End will give Nashville every bit the urban feel, if not more, than having a few more tall towers in the CBD would. I think we will all be happily suprised at how Nashville looks and feels in 10 years.

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I think Nashville is competing quite well. I don't remember Charlotte or Jacksonville being on Nissan's list. As I said in another post, skyscrapers do not make a city. People do. I am sure Richard Fletcher of the 511 group wants to build his Nashville City Center 2 at 40 stories and 596 feet, but if there is not a market for it, it's not going to be built.

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I think it's the other way around on many levels. Can they compete with us? Being a little behind on the built environment is only one of several barometers of success. And we're pumping that one up quite a bit. We're at the top of so many lists, I think it's only a matter of time before our secret is out.

Look at the things we have to look forward to. There's a lot of cities out there that get excited about things we don't even mention anymore...and that's all they have. It's all in perspective. The city is changing before our very eyes. It won't be ten years, but two, when the changes will really begin to be extraordinary.

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Skyline? Who cares about a skyline? What can a nice skyline do for you besides look pretty in a postcard? Besides, Nashville isn't exactly lacking in that department to begin with. What really matters is the street level and how the city interacts with it and in those regards Nashville pretty much blows those two away and will continue to do so. I can honestly say that a large midrise apartment complex with ground floor retail that fills up a vacant block and hugs the sidewalk is FAR more exciting to me than a skyscraper surrounded by a big empty plaza.

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Skyline? Who cares about a skyline? What can a nice skyline do for you besides look pretty in a postcard? Besides, Nashville isn't exactly lacking in that department to begin with. What really matters is the street level and how the city interacts with it and in those regards Nashville pretty much blows those two away and will continue to do so. I can honestly say that a large midrise apartment complex with ground floor retail that fills up a vacant block and hugs the sidewalk is FAR more exciting to me than a skyscraper surrounded by a big empty plaza.

Look people. The only, and I mean ONLY, reason Charlotte is getting a new residential tower is because of that new arena the city whined and cryed about getting. At the hockey game last night, I ran into a family from Charlotte that said they can't give the tickets away for the NBA team in Charlotte because nobody cares about it. What a waste. The real question was stated above, "Will Charlotte be able to sustain all the development?" Plus, has anyone ever looked at an aerial pic of Charlotte? There are plenty-o-parking lots between Uptown and the rest of the city to build on. I am sure land is cheeper there.

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If Nashville can't compete in the arena of great cities due to inadequate skyscraper construction, does that mean Memphis is a dead city? We've only had one tower over 300 feet built in the last 30 years.

Fortunately, I don't think skyscraper construction defines healthy, vibrant cities. The era of the skyscraper has ended in the U.S. Sure, you still see some going up, but nothing like the way they were throughout most of the late 20th century when the skylines of our major cities were in a state of constant change. For the past 10 years, we don't see cranes all over Manhattan, Chicago, LA, Dallas or Atlanta the way we used to.

I agree that what's happening at street level is far more important to the people that will chose where whether or not they want to live in a city. That's where a city's culture really exists. Think of all the great European cities where there's scarcely a skyscraper to be found.

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If Nashville can't compete in the arena of great cities due to inadequate skyscraper construction, does that mean Memphis is a dead city? We've only had one tower over 300 feet built in the last 30 years.

Fortunately, I don't think skyscraper construction defines healthy, vibrant cities. The era of the skyscraper has ended in the U.S. Sure, you still see some going up, but nothing like the way they were throughout most of the late 20th century when the skylines of our major cities were in a state of constant change. For the past 10 years, we don't see cranes all over Manhattan, Chicago, LA, Dallas or Atlanta the way we used to.

I agree that what's happening at street level is far more important to the people that will chose where whether or not they want to live in a city. That's where a city's culture really exists. Think of all the great European cities where there's scarcely a skyscraper to be found.

Good point. Streetlevel is where it's at.

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Good point. Streetlevel is where it's at.

I also believe that streetlevel is far and away the most important, and that Nashville does have a distinct advantage over those two cities in that area. And, IMO Nashville is right on the verge of a building boom that will be unprecedented in its history. If this new boom of development is done right with the streetlevel being of primary importance, then Nashville will continue to improve and will become a greater city. I personally expect that this is exactly what is about to happen!

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I also believe that streetlevel is far and away the most important, and that Nashville does have a distinct advantage over those two cities in that area. And, IMO Nashville is right on the verge of a building boom that will be unprecedented in its history. If this new boom of development is done right with the streetlevel being of primary importance, then Nashville will continue to improve and will become a greater city. I personally expect that this is exactly what is about to happen!

I couldn't agree anymore to your statement. If you listen to any Charlotte forumer, they would talk a hole in the ground telling about all the streetlevel activity and stuff they have. But I have been to other cities like Charlotte and they have their share, but it is not like that in Nashville. Charlotte lacks that distinctive urban feel that you get in Nashville. not all of Nashville, but certain places. Even Atlanta, God forbid, has that feel that you get here. It isn't the same urban feel in the northeast, but more of a southern urban feel. Urban, but new, (not old like in the NE) I guess.

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I love Nashville's creative vibe. I love the eclectic look of the many people who live here. My observation is that people from the Carolinas seem a bit more wholesome and wear more golf shirts than we do. We wear lots of black and pierce body parts, and drive expensive Harleys. Hip and trendy...without the ferns.

You choose. lol ;)

Hope my Carolina friends read this the right way.

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Look people. The only, and I mean ONLY, reason Charlotte is getting a new residential tower is because of that new arena the city whined and cryed about getting.

In Charlotte's defense, about five or so residential towers have been proposed, the one near the new arena almost finished (Courtside--the smallest of the lot). Condo living is booming over this way. Also, I don't think it's fair to say that the arena itself spurred all of the condo development, since the taxpayers of Charlotte actually didn't want the arena constructed in the first place. I'm no Charlotte booster by any means, but I just wanted to provide some clarity in this regard.

At any rate, I prefer density over height. Our nation's capital is one of the most urban cities anywhere, yet practically lacks a skyline. Towers look nice, but I prefer mid-rise density over towers any day of the week. That said, I wouldn't judge Nashville's overall competitiveness simply by the amount of skyscrapers proposed/under construction. That might play a part, but it certainly doesn't tell the whole story.

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In Charlotte's defense, about five or so residential towers have been proposed, the one near the new arena almost finished (Courtside--the smallest of the lot). Condo living is booming over this way. Also, I don't think it's fair to say that the arena itself spurred all of the condo development, since the taxpayers of Charlotte actually didn't want the arena constructed in the first place. I'm no Charlotte booster by any means, but I just wanted to provide some clarity in this regard.

At any rate, I prefer density over height. Our nation's capital is one of the most urban cities anywhere, yet practically lacks a skyline. Towers look nice, but I prefer mid-rise density over towers any day of the week. That said, I wouldn't judge Nashville's overall competitiveness simply by the amount of skyscrapers proposed/under construction. That might play a part, but it certainly doesn't tell the whole story.

I said that because this stuff (development) happens alot when a new sports venue is opened in a city. For whatever reason, capital investment increases when you build a stadium/arena.

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^That's cool, but I'm sure at least some of those towers would have been proposed anyway even if the arena didn't get built, as the taxpayers of Charlotte desired.

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^That's cool, but I'm sure at least some of those towers would have been proposed anyway even if the arena didn't get built, as the taxpayers of Charlotte desired.

Absolutely. Without a doubt they would've been proposed. Charlotte is undergoing its own growth stages just like Nashville. I think the cities parallel themselves more than any others in the country.

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I don't think you can really compare the cities on an equal footing. Location alone, makes Jacksonville a very different city from Nashville or Charlotte, in terms of development and economy. Being on the Atlantic coast, as well as a major river makes it a highly attractive region for high-rise projects. Being a major port city even makes our economy and companies we attract vastly different from those that seek cities such as Nashville and Charlotte. For example, While Nissan may look at Nashville for a major plant, a coal company may look at Jax for a major shipping terminal.

I'm not as familiar with these other two cities, but as far as vibrancy goes, there is much more emphasis here in the urban walkable neighborhoods and districts surrounding downtown, than downtown its self. I agree, streetlevel is much more important. Luckily, you'll see just as many low or mid-rise projects going up surrounding neighborhoods and at the beaches, as high-rises going up in downtown. In the end, I think all of these cities have bright futures. We stand to learn a lot from the things Nashville is doing (ex. affordable commuter rail) and I'm sure there are things that Nashville can learn from us as well (ex. Better Jax Plan). Locals in all, should place their efforts on finding ways to improve their own qualities of lifes to become better Jax's, Nash's and Charlotte's instead of worrying about keeping up with the Jones'.

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I agree with what Lakelander has said. I would also say we should all try and learn from each other's successes and mistakes and not get into comparisons and city vs. city as much. Each city (Nashville, Jacksonville and Charlotte) is unique and great in their own way and will continue to improve in the future. I am looking forward to it.

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Look people. The only, and I mean ONLY, reason Charlotte is getting a new residential tower is because of that new arena the city whined and cryed about getting. At the hockey game last night, I ran into a family from Charlotte that said they can't give the tickets away for the NBA team in Charlotte because nobody cares about it. What a waste. The real question was stated above, "Will Charlotte be able to sustain all the development?" Plus, has anyone ever looked at an aerial pic of Charlotte? There are plenty-o-parking lots between Uptown and the rest of the city to build on. I am sure land is cheeper there.

:sick:

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One of the problems I've followed in the Nashville region is the surrounding counties are eating at Davidsons population and workforce. Davidson actually lost population between 2000-2002(3) to those counties. This pulling away from the urban core is keeping Nashville from having the same level of urban construction and propositions as Jax, Charlotte, Orl, Tampa.

I understand Purcell (?) isn't going to run again. Are those that plan to run urban minded? If you can elect a solid urban minded mayor and get the Signature tower up, Nashville will take off on another boom. It's urban core is already decently lively with the colleges, music row nearby and more.

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Good contributions, Lakelander and Riverside. We appreciate your stopping in for comments from time to time. It's good for perspective. LL, watch out for all that rain coming your way. Be careful out there.

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Its relatively safe here in Jax. Because of the city's geographic location, Boston, MA has a better chance taking a direct hit from a hurricane, than we do. Anyway, its been reported in the Florida subforum that a mile of Metrorail tracks have been blown to the ground, as well as some cranes in Miami and the glass windows in some skyscrapers. Looting has also been reported in downtown.

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I think the cities parallel themselves more than any others in the country.

I totally disagree, and that is all I will say. :)

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