Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

The_sandlapper

SC Cities Daytime population

Recommended Posts

We have heard several times discusssions about daytime populations of our largest cities. Well the census has put the speculation to rest. Columbia's population swells 60% during the day from 116,000 to 184,000. It turns out Columbia and Greenville have some of the largest daytime population increases among all U.S. cities with a population of at least 50,000. Greenville

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


We have heard several times discusssions about daytime populations of our largest cities. Well the census has put the speculation to rest. Columbia's population swells 60% during the day from 116,000 to 184,000. It turns out Columbia and Greenville have some of the largest daytime population increases among all U.S. cities with a population of at least 50,000. Greenville

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this The_sandlapper, I never got around to it. Columbia ranks 6th for largest daytime increase for cities with 100,000-249,999 residents and Greenville ranks 1st for cities with 50,000-99,999 residents. Myrtle Beach ranks 15th for cities with a population of 15,000-24,999.

As for counties, here are how ours rank. The first figure is the 2000 population, the second is the daytime population, and the third is the percent increase:

1) Richland: 320,677 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 362,799 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 13.1%

2) Charleston: 309,969 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 350,414 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 13.0%

3) Greenville: 379,616 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 415,776 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 9.5%

4) Beaufort: 120,937 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 128,558 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 6.3%

5) Greenwood: 66,271 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 70,458 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 6.3%

6) Florence: 125,761 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 133,093 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 5.8%

7) Allendale: 11,211 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 11,528 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 2.8%

8) Spartanburg: 253,791 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 259,065 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 2.1%

9) Georgetown: 55,797 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 56,925 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 2.0%

10) Horry: 196,629 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 200,409 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 1.9%

All other counties had losses in their daytime populations. The counties with the largest loss percentages are Calhoun and Saluda with 19.8% and 19.4%, respectively. The biggest surprises to me on this list were Georgetown and Allendale, especially Allendale.

As for the entire state of SC, we experience a daytime loss of 0.8%. Maryland experiences a whopping 5.1% loss, while the District of Columbia experiences a staggering 71.8% increase in its daytime population.

Surprisingly, California experiences a slight loss of 0.1%.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this The_sandlapper, I never got around to it. Columbia ranks 6th for largest daytime increase for cities with 100,000-249,999 residents and Greenville ranks 1st for cities with 50,000-99,999 residents. Myrtle Beach ranks 15th for cities with a population of 15,000-24,999.

As for counties, here are how ours rank. The first figure is the 2000 population, the second is the daytime population, and the third is the percent increase:

1) Richland: 320,677 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 362,799 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 13.1%

2) Charleston: 309,969 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 350,414 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 13.0%

3) Greenville: 379,616 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 415,776 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 9.5%

4) Beaufort: 120,937 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 128,558 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 6.3%

5) Greenwood: 66,271 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 70,458 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 6.3%

6) Florence: 125,761 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 133,093 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 5.8%

7) Allendale: 11,211 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 11,528 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 2.8%

8) Spartanburg: 253,791 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 259,065 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 2.1%

9) Georgetown: 55,797 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 56,925 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 2.0%

10) Horry: 196,629 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 200,409 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 1.9%

All other counties had losses in their daytime populations. The counties with the largest loss percentages are Calhoun and Saluda with 19.8% and 19.4%, respectively. The biggest surprises to me on this list were Georgetown and Allendale, especially Allendale.

As for the entire state of SC, we experience a daytime loss of 0.8%. Maryland experiences a whopping 5.1% loss, while the District of Columbia experiences a staggering 71.8% increase in its daytime population.

Surprisingly, California experiences a slight loss of 0.1%.

Wow, those are very interesting! thanks for posting. What year are these from, 2000? I wonder how much they've changed since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem. I thought this was interesting because I have always wonderd what the living breathing population of Columbia was 24hrs/day. I didn't even know the census kept these types of figures, are these new stats or have I just overlooked them for years?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the first time the census has done something like this.

And yes, these are 2000 figures. I would also like to know exactly how much change has occurred between then and now. It would have been cool if 2004 estimates were used instead. But perhaps the methodology used to calculate daytime populations only utilizes data collected during the official decennial census and not annual estimates.

At any rate, I guess someone could always use the percentage and apply it to the 2004 estimates to get some more current figures, assuming that rate still holds true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These numbers were based on the 2000 census, over half a decade old now. I have heard that Greenville's daytime population is estimated at near 200,000. Imagine the percentage change today. It will be interesting to see the difference in number of residents located within the City next census. It has been growing at an incredible pace because of the attractive and vibrant downtown. :shades:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They had a write up in the paper a couple of months back.saying columbia needs more police officers because of traffic population that swells around rush hr. No matter how many highways we have in columbia and alternate routes if you're driving anywhere in the city close to 5pm the traffic is out of control. Certain roads i don't attempt to travel on close to 5 like broad river rd and I-26 passing function juntion is a mess.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if Greenville County's pop is hitting half a million during the day. Since it's over 400,000, it's got to be close. Also, it's interesting that no other county in the state's daytime pop even comes close to Greenville's normal population. food for thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, it's interesting that no other county in the state's daytime pop even comes close to Greenville's normal population. food for thought.

Richland comes somewhat close. Using the 2000 figures, Richland is only ~17,000 less than Greenville's normal population. That's not too big of a difference. Using the 2004 estimates and the percentage rates given, Richland's daytime population is 378,442 which is a difference of about 23,000 from Greenville's normal population. That's a little more of a difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charleston County

309,969 (2000 est.) x 13.0% (2000 daytime increase % est.) = +40,445 (350,414)

326,762 (2004 est.) x 13.0% (2000 daytime increase % est.) = +42,479 (369,241)

Greenville County

379,616 (2000 est.) x 9.5% (2000 daytime increase % est.) = +36,160 (415,776)

401,174 (2004 est.) x 9.5% (2000 daytime increase % est.) = +38,112 (439,286)

Richland County

320,677 (2000 est.) x 13.1% (2000 daytime increase % est.) = +42,122 (362,799)

334,609 (2004 est.) x 13.1% (2000 daytime increase % est.) = +43,834 (378,443)

*All are very rough estimates of course! My apologies for any possible errors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this The_sandlapper, I never got around to it. Columbia ranks 6th for largest daytime increase for cities with 100,000-249,999 residents and Greenville ranks 1st for cities with 50,000-99,999 residents. Myrtle Beach ranks 15th for cities with a population of 15,000-24,999.

As for counties, here are how ours rank. The first figure is the 2000 population, the second is the daytime population, and the third is the percent increase:

1) Richland: 320,677 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 362,799 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 13.1%

2) Charleston: 309,969 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 350,414 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 13.0%

3) Greenville: 379,616 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 415,776 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 9.5%

4) Beaufort: 120,937 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 128,558 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 6.3%

5) Greenwood: 66,271 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 70,458 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 6.3%

6) Florence: 125,761 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 133,093 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 5.8%

7) Allendale: 11,211 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 11,528 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 2.8%

8) Spartanburg: 253,791 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 259,065 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 2.1%

9) Georgetown: 55,797 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 56,925 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 2.0%

10) Horry: 196,629 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 200,409 {sodEmoji.{sodEmoji.|}} 1.9%

All other counties had losses in their daytime populations. The counties with the largest loss percentages are Calhoun and Saluda with 19.8% and 19.4%, respectively. The biggest surprises to me on this list were Georgetown and Allendale, especially Allendale.

As for the entire state of SC, we experience a daytime loss of 0.8%. Maryland experiences a whopping 5.1% loss, while the District of Columbia experiences a staggering 71.8% increase in its daytime population.

Surprisingly, California experiences a slight loss of 0.1%.

These statistics are decieving. Keep in mind that they are COUNTY's daytime population, which reflects the amount of workers each recieves from other counties. Richland is naturally going to be higher because of the amount of workers it gets from Lexington, and Charleston from Berkeley and Dorchester. Just remember to keep these things in perspective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These statistics are decieving. Keep in mind that they are COUNTY's daytime population, which reflects the amount of workers each recieves from other counties. Richland is naturally going to be higher because of the amount of workers it gets from Lexington, and Charleston from Berkeley and Dorchester. Just remember to keep these things in perspective.

Spartan, I'm not understanding your concern. I mentioned that those were county statistics. I think that's important, especially in a state with annexation laws as restrictive as ours; it may better reflect daytime population trends.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They had a write up in the paper a couple of months back.saying columbia needs more police officers because of traffic population that swells around rush hr. No matter how many highways we have in columbia and alternate routes if you're driving anywhere in the city close to 5pm the traffic is out of control. Certain roads i don't attempt to travel on close to 5 like broad river rd and I-26 passing function juntion is a mess.

Broad River Rd. traffic around 5 is straight up ignorant!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Spartan, I'm not understanding your concern. I mentioned that those were county statistics. I think that's important, especially in a state with annexation laws as restrictive as ours; it may better reflect daytime population trends.

The topic is daytime population of SC's cities. Throwing in county stats is irrelevant IMO, because of that. I will grant you that the annexation laws throw things off, but the County level stats are not fully representative of the cities for the reasons I stated previously.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I respectfully disagree; I think county stats are totally relevant here and it seems that others here have appreciated these statistics. I'm really not seeing the big deal here. Should I have started another thread about daytime county populations? I don't think it's that serious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeez...I think we all can agree that the county #s are wrong, but they are just a rough, rough guestimate on how much the county population might increase each day. The only thing that we cannot concretely factor in is the # of county residents who leave the county completely for work each day or how many arrive from outside to work in the county.

If people look at the city increase %s (13.1, 13.0, and 9.5) then it appears that Greenville County is the smallest to some people, while the total pop. proves otherwise.

You just gotta be able to read and understand what statistics may or may not infer?

EXAMPLE:

Greenville (city) is the least populated of the 3...BUT is also the smallest in size by land.

That makes Greenville's population equate to like 2000+ people per square mile while Columbia and Charleston are closer to 900+.

Greenville = fewer people total in city

Greenville = highest density of people (crammed into 24sq. mi)

All I know is I could care doodley on largest this, or most that, because none of it takes away the Woodruff Rd. Warriors and my headaches...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gosh, just forget I ever mentioned county statistics.

Our major cities experience major increases in population every workday. Whoopdedoo. Forgive me for not jumping for joy; bad back, ya know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gosh, just forget I ever mentioned county statistics.

Our major cities experience major increases in population every workday. Whoopdedoo. Forgive me for not jumping for joy; bad back, ya know.

WHAT? You didn't jump for joy? What kinda true Sandlapper are you then boy! :rofl:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeez...I think we all can agree that the county #s are wrong, but they are just a rough, rough guestimate on how much the county population might increase each day. The only thing that we cannot concretely factor in is the # of county residents who leave the county completely for work each day or how many arrive from outside to work in the county.

If people look at the city increase %s (13.1, 13.0, and 9.5) then it appears that Greenville County is the smallest to some people, while the total pop. proves otherwise.

You just gotta be able to read and understand what statistics may or may not infer?

EXAMPLE:

Greenville (city) is the least populated of the 3...BUT is also the smallest in size by land.

That makes Greenville's population equate to like 2000+ people per square mile while Columbia and Charleston are closer to 900+.

Greenville = fewer people total in city

Greenville = highest density of people (crammed into 24sq. mi)

All I know is I could care doodley on largest this, or most that, because none of it takes away the Woodruff Rd. Warriors and my headaches...

Columbia's people per square mile would be higher than that if you don't really count Fort Jackson...So you have a certain # crammed in about 40 square miles than almost 130

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.