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IN PROGRESS: Metro Centre Plaza | T.F. Green Station

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A $267-million project under way to link T.F. Green Airport in Warwick with the commuter rail lines to Boston, Providence and Wickford Junction could face another hurdle if voters fail to approve Question 1 on the ballot Tuesday.

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PBN: "Intermodal station update a chance to push for R.I. transportation bond issue"

http://www.pbn.com/stories/36013.html

Is Scott A. ever going to get it? Here "in the City of Warwick". He tries to connect TF Green to Warwick. So immature.

Someone has to tell him people do not fly to Warwick or any other suburb. Perhaps he needs to be advised that you are not "in" Baltimore when you land at BWI. Next time I fly to New Orleans I'll announce I have arrived in "Kenner".

I am fying to Providence and writing to DOT and the Governor to press to ensure the station is called T.F. Green Intermodel Station.

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Hey PVD, just wondering and not really knowing, so dont crucify me, but follow my logic

Wouldn't the expanded PVD airport be more likely to gain domestic flights as an alternative to Logan and not likely be an international airport?

Satalite airports like PVD usually end up being more in the mold of Chicagos midway, or Long Island Islip. Ohare, JFK, Logan get the international and connecting domestic flights while the smaller satalite airports get heavy domestic traffic through discount aitlines like Southwest.

Yes, the end result is likely simular, in that it is good for business, but from my understanding, international flights only exist if the cities corporate presence is strong enough to warrent an overseas connection for business travelers.

This is why Hartford has had and will be getting back the Amsterdam flight. Not because Hartford is a bigger, better city, because it is not, but because we have more fortune 100 companies with operations in Europe, and we have the domestic HQ for ING USFS in Hartford. So with close to 3000 people working for this dutch giant(including myself) the demand is questionably high enough to demand an international flight.

Is my logic in line?

I would love to see a nice high speed rail connection between TFG and downtown Boston, and of course Providence. As a City Providence is lucky to be part of greater Boston, because it provides some great opportinities. But additionally Providence is a large enough important enough city in its own right to be able to generate its own health and is definately not a suburb of Boston.

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Hey PVD, just wondering and not really knowing, so dont crucify me, but follow my logic

Wouldn't the expanded PVD airport be more likely to gain domestic flights as an alternative to Logan and not likely be an international airport?

Satalite airports like PVD usually end up being more in the mold of Chicagos midway, or Long Island Islip. Ohare, JFK, Logan get the international and connecting domestic flights while the smaller satalite airports get heavy domestic traffic through discount aitlines like Southwest.

Yes, the end result is likely simular, in that it is good for business, but from my understanding, international flights only exist if the cities corporate presence is strong enough to warrent an overseas connection for business travelers.

This is why Hartford has had and will be getting back the Amsterdam flight. Not because Hartford is a bigger, better city, because it is not, but because we have more fortune 100 companies with operations in Europe, and we have the domestic HQ for ING USFS in Hartford. So with close to 3000 people working for this dutch giant(including myself) the demand is questionably high enough to demand an international flight.

Is my logic in line?

I would love to see a nice high speed rail connection between TFG and downtown Boston, and of course Providence. As a City Providence is lucky to be part of greater Boston, because it provides some great opportinities. But additionally Providence is a large enough important enough city in its own right to be able to generate its own health and is definately not a suburb of Boston.

Well, the airports in question don't always fit that mold. Midway really can't handle larger aircraft, hence O'Hare's growth. In the case of JFK, well LaGuardia is also cramped for space but is also heavily regulated in terms of what can be flown out of there. Same thing with National and Dulles.

It's a weird cycle with air service. A city needs a good business environment for airlines to come, and many businesses need a good air service environment to come in.

That being said, I think PVD has a good shot at international service, obviously never the size of Logan but I think there is potential for a discount international carrier to come to PVD. I think the train station is key in attracting more service.

Another thing to watch is Southwest. They've set up codeshares for Mexico and Canada. While it seems they want to get codeshares for the Caribbean and Hawaii first, Europe is still on the table. PVD is a possible spot to have international traffic transfer over. The runway plays a role though.

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Voice:

You are correct in some instances and a bit off in others. BDL and CT put up large amounts of incentives and cash to get and now re-get that flight. From what I hear, PVD is willing to offer substantial incentives as well. The corporate environment is indeed stronger in the BDL market, but PVD's own corporate portfolio with European ties (read: Textron, Citizens, FM Global, APC, Hexagon, Cookson, Mahr Federal, and many more small to medium companies) coupled with both inbound (something, quite frankly, the BDL market doesn't have) and outbound tourism when added to PVD's ability to draw from greater BOS is certainly strong enough to support limited UK or Paris service. PVD also has a stronger demographic tie to Europe than BDL does. BDL has larger ties to Peurto Rico and Jamaica than PVD does. This would provide additional demand from PVD. Webbage also hits on a key point regarding the new train station being built here. Europeans (unlike Americans for the most part and especially some short-sighted RI leaders we've had over the years) actually prefer mass-transit where available. Arriving passengers will soon be able to travel from PVD to Providence, Boston and points between. It is also arguably a better gateway to the Cape than Logan and is clearly easier to the CT casinos.

Long story short, BDL might have overall stronger corporate demand, but PVD is more a "complete package" type of market.

09/21/39 - here are pics taken earlier today:

These are taken from the airport end down the future skyway 'corridor.' These are the foundations of the piers that will support the skyway.

DSCN0402.jpg

DSCN0404-1.jpg

DSCN0403.jpg

This one is where the skyway will attach to the terminal:

DSCN0405.jpg

Webbage also makes some great points regarding Southwest, etc.

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Thanks Mental for the pictures. Things are finally taking shape there. It will be exciting to see the progress over the next few years.

The ability to transfer to a train in the event of bad weather will distinguish PVD from the other arirports in the area.

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Well, the airports in question don't always fit that mold. Midway really can't handle larger aircraft, hence O'Hare's growth. In the case of JFK, well LaGuardia is also cramped for space but is also heavily regulated in terms of what can be flown out of there. Same thing with National and Dulles.

It's a weird cycle with air service. A city needs a good business environment for airlines to come, and many businesses need a good air service environment to come in.

That being said, I think PVD has a good shot at international service, obviously never the size of Logan but I think there is potential for a discount international carrier to come to PVD. I think the train station is key in attracting more service.

Another thing to watch is Southwest. They've set up codeshares for Mexico and Canada. While it seems they want to get codeshares for the Caribbean and Hawaii first, Europe is still on the table. PVD is a possible spot to have international traffic transfer over. The runway plays a role though.

Michael O'Leary of RYANAIR (an irish discount carrier) has already stated that they would like to start transatlantic flights within the next 4-5 years with Providence being one of his airports of choice. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/travel/ne...icle1645813.ece I like the way they refer to Providence as being "ON" Rhode Island.

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Amtrak has pretty much said they do not plan to offer service to TF Green, at least on the Acela service. The NEC is electrified - is there any reason why say Massport or RI could not offer their own high-speed, or at least relatively close to high-speed, service between the airport and Boston?

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Amtrak has pretty much said they do not plan to offer service to TF Green, at least on the Acela service. The NEC is electrified - is there any reason why say Massport or RI could not offer their own high-speed, or at least relatively close to high-speed, service between the airport and Boston?

The rails between Providence (soon to be Warwick as well) and Boston are already at nearly maximum capacity. Providence already sees 40-50 Amtrak trains daily http://www.amtrak.com/timetable/oct08/W04.pdf

. Add in all the MBTA trains and there is almost no room to add anything else, especially at peak times. Walk down to the train station at 5pm on a Friday, the tracks are heavily used. Unlike what Metro North has going down in New Haven-NYC with 3 tracks, there are only 2 tracks around here: a northbound and a southbound track. On top of it, Amtrak owns all the rails here and would have to approve any other service. I think MBTA was lucky to get the tracks down in Warwick as this is where there trains run at the highest speeds.

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just a few points of clarification:

1) There are 3 tracks from the Boston switch (between Providence and Pawtucket on the NEC) all the way down to Wickford/Quonset. This 3rd track is used for the P&W freight runs as well as the future RI commuter rail service.

2) The Acela goes fastest between the RI/CT line up to the East Greenwich area as it slows for it's approach into the city.

3) There are 5 tracks at the Providence station: 2 used heavily, 2 used mostly during peak times and 1 not at all right now (freight).

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just a few points of clarification:

1) There are 3 tracks from the Boston switch (between Providence and Pawtucket on the NEC) all the way down to Wickford/Quonset. This 3rd track is used for the P&W freight runs as well as the future RI commuter rail service.

There are only two tracks in East Greenwich.

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It doesn't take much imagination to see that once the runway is extended and train station built, TF Green will become an attractive location for airlines wanting to expand into NE just as Southwest did. If you build it they will come. From east and west.

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found this on the Airport's website: http://www.pvdairport.com/main.aspx?guid=a...05-62a7ac715ac8

"Intermodal Update

6 January 2009

Intermodal Overview

The Intermodal Project, a collaborative effort of the Rhode Island Airport Corporation, working in partnership with the Rhode Island Department of Transportation, and the Federal Highway Administration, will drastically enhance the experience for TF Green Airport travelers.

The project is broken into four major areas of construction - the Terminal End Improvements (TEI); the skywalk; the customer service operations building (CSO) and the parking garage and fueling platforms. These four major components of the Intermodal project are being built concurrently.

The project will take an anticipated 530,000 man hours to complete and at peak construction will have 300 workers on site. Once completed, the $267 million transportation hub with its MBTA commuter rail platform will be the closest rail line (1,570 feet) to a major airport terminal in the country.

Construction Outlook - January 2009

Terminal End Improvements (TEI)

Work includes completion of excavation for the stair tower that will eventually connect the airport terminal to the skywalk and train station. Footings and foundations at the stair tower have been poured and are now ready for steelwork. Existing footings and foundations have been removed on the secure side of the temporary fence at the TEI. Rebar and concrete work at the TEI is ongoing. All footings have been excavated and concrete will be placed in the next few weeks.

Skywalk

All pile caps have been installed between the terminal and Post Road. The skywalk piers will be formed over the next few months. A water main on Fresno Street (off Post Road) was relocated, enabling continued pile driving for skywalk piers and the pouring of pile caps.

Customer Service Operations Building(CSO)

Building work is ahead of schedule. Spread footings and foundation walls have been poured at the CSO building location. The concrete footings and foundations have been backfilled and the trade contractors will begin to prepare the slab-on-grade for pouring. Leveling plates were installed and anchor bolts were surveyed in late December. Steel work for the building will start in mid-January.

Garage and Fueling Platforms

Production Steel H piles are being driven at the east garage. These piles are 60% complete. Some of the production mini-piles have been drilled at the east garage. The majority of the underground drainage lines and structures have been completed at the west garage, including in ground support structures for the fueling system. Soil stabilization efforts have been completed along Coronado in preparation for the retaining wall work which will begin in January 2009. Footings and foundation walls are continuously being formed and poured at the west garage."

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I was actually at the airport a couple nights ago and saw signs of this construction. It was too dark to get a pic, but there's definitely steel sticking up from the lot. You know, the type to reinforce concrete. I had been meaning to post about it.

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I was actually at the airport a couple nights ago and saw signs of this construction. It was too dark to get a pic, but there's definitely steel sticking up from the lot. You know, the type to reinforce concrete. I had been meaning to post about it.

I drove past the airport today and noticed a couple of REBAR cages up for the walkway columns in the parking lot. Sorry but I was not getting out of the car to take pictures.

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Look at the flag on top of the crane. I feel for these guys doing this work for us in this preposterous weather. Somebody buy them a cup of coffee.

Have no fear Frymaster, they get plenty of coffee breaks and are making more than enough money to buy their own.

Plus if you have ever met a steel and/iron worker you would understand that they don't feel anything. Heat and Cold in particular.

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There are only two tracks in East Greenwich so as to not destroy the historical nature of the downtown (this was done on purpose). It's only for short distance then it opens back up to three tracks in North Kingstown into Quonset. There's a 3rd track siding for a small section as well near Rocky Hollow Road.

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