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Norm

Cumberland Plateau, "Next Big Thing"

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Norm    0

Read an article on Tennessean today ...

http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/ar.../510290350/1022

... and I'm wondering what you guys might think. I attended college in Cookeville for five years and know its grown some, but this region between Crossville and Knoxville is interesting.

Do you also think this area could be a boom for second homes and eco-tourism? It's got the natural amenities for both but the far-eastern portion of the state (past Knoxville) seems to me to be a more attractive area for such.

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Lexy    314

I have seen several ads on TV advertising land over on the plateau. Develoments are selling property for people from what I see. I think it could be a big boom for that area no doubt. It definatly has nature and beauty going for it. Prices are a bit out of my realm though.

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Rural King    1

Read an article on Tennessean today ...

http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/ar.../510290350/1022

... and I'm wondering what you guys might think. I attended college in Cookeville for five years and know its grown some, but this region between Crossville and Knoxville is interesting.

Do you also think this area could be a boom for second homes and eco-tourism? It's got the natural amenities for both but the far-eastern portion of the state (past Knoxville) seems to me to be a more attractive area for such.

I read this the other day as well. I think eco-tourism, second-home folks, and tele-commuters could be a great boon for the region economically and gain the region population, but I think its impact will not be as large or as positive as if middle to high wage paying plants/operations increased in the area. I feel that the location of entities creating large numbers of decent paying physical jobs to an area have a much more significant and meaningful impact to a region than tele-commuters and second-home folks coming in, and thats what th area should strive for. Eco-tourism is an industry that could be significant, but how many and how much will any spin off jobs in that area pay? I think for any region to really prosper the local population has to be the ones getting more and better paying jobs. Does that make sense? Not sure how clear I was in this statement.

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Norm    0

I agree, Rural King. A sustainable economy is based on industry and commercial uses. Service economies work well in Florida, but in Crossville, TN?

Basically, if the Plateau region sported eco-tourism, that's exactly what would follow: a restaurant/hotel service economy. Plus, there would be no guarantee that the second homes built in the area would stay and flourish for long either. Again, Florida is already having problems with abandoned/decaying retirement communities. If it can happen to them, it could happen to us.

Overall, I think it's an okay possibility to have this sort of development in the area. But like you, I also think they should focus on more traditional/proven types of development.

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memphian    185

I too went to college in Cookeville. Over the weekend I read the article referrenced above. I have to tell you that the area is very attractive and offers to many people a style of living that you just can't get in the bigger cities in the State.

One of the biggest surprises to me was most likely an oversight on my part. I never really thought of the University of the South as an Upper Cumberland institution. Generally when higher education for the region is discussed TECH is touted. I think it is great for the Upper Cumberland to have a second university to claim. Strength comes in numbers.

The next thing the area needs to really address is accessibility. Currently the regional airport, in Sparta, is one that only small jets can charter into. Averitt has been rumored in the past to look at an air division to hub out of this airport but it hasn't happened yet. What kind of impact would a scheduled service from say American Airlines have on the area's growth? Is it feasible anytime in the near future? Access by road is easy, three major cities, Nashville Knoxville and Chattanooga are all less than 1.5 hours away by car.

As long as the area grows smart I think it could become a very desireable place for younger professionals to live as well as retirees. I don't see a major urban development in the future though, although it would be the smarter route to take.

Just my opinion.

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TennBear    0

I too went to college in Cookeville. Over the weekend I read the article referrenced above. I have to tell you that the area is very attractive and offers to many people a style of living that you just can't get in the bigger cities in the State.

One of the biggest surprises to me was most likely an oversight on my part. I never really thought of the University of the South as an Upper Cumberland institution. Generally when higher education for the region is discussed TECH is touted. I think it is great for the Upper Cumberland to have a second university to claim. Strength comes in numbers.

Memphian, I like the Cumberland Plateau too. Funny, but I have never thought of the University of the South in conjunction with the Cumberland Plateau either. If we are to count Sewannee, then we should count Tullahoma. The Space Institute is located there along with Arnold Engineering. I don't really count the Sequatchie Valley and points south and west as part of the Cumberland. Maybe it should, but they start to get into the Chattanooga Area and/or Nashville Area. Of course, they may not think so.

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Norm    0

Memphian, I like the Cumberland Plateau too. Funny, but I have never thought of the University of the South in conjunction with the Cumberland Plateau either.

I, too, never considered University of the South as part of the Plateau, but mostly for the reason of personal-perception. If I'm not mistaken, it's a private school and somewhat elite. Those types of colleges are all fine and dandy, but I never include them as part of a region's identity--since the vast majority of students aren't from that region, but from other areas removed from the plateau.

Vanderbilt U is an exception, of course, but otherwise, I typically only associate public universities with any given region.

Oh, and returning to the development topic, Memphian said there's issues with accessibility. I agree whole-heartedly. And for that reason, I think the area is challenged for more conventional development.

That being said, I also think the size and character of the communities in the Plateau region is suitable. Crossville is the most likely candidate for expandsion and growth, but otherwise, I would truly be saddened to see huge/fast/sprawling development booms taking place in places like Monterey, Sparta, Jamestown, etc.

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ATLBrain    1

Cumberland County is one of the TN's fastest growing over the last 15 years. My family used to go camping near there, so I saw a lot of the changes. Crossville is quite a bustling town. It has a thriving ceramics industry in addition to the retirement communities. I understand that the area is growing in popularity with so-called "half-backs".... retirees who moved to Florida and decided for whatever reasons that they didn't want to stay there. TN offers four seasons with temperate climate and low cost of living (no income tax too! for those who care). Surrounding states have seen similar in migration too. However, this area is one of the most popular.

Side note: Has anybody been through the Sequatchie Valley. That is w/o a doubt one of the most beautiful areas in the USA. Especially if you go through there in Spring or Fall. With Fall Creek Falls and Cumberland Mountain, I'm not surprised at the area's sudden popularity. I've even thought about moving there someday, but I'll probably end up in Nashvegas.

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Norm    0

Side note: Has anybody been through the Sequatchie Valley. That is w/o a doubt one of the most beautiful areas in the USA. Especially if you go through there in Spring or Fall. With Fall Creek Falls and Cumberland Mountain, I'm not surprised at the area's sudden popularity. I've even thought about moving there someday, but I'll probably end up in Nashvegas.

My wife and I have visited those areas, but for my money I believe the entire region of Big South Fork is the finest in the Southeast. Simply amazing ... oh, I wish I was there now

*sighs*

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