uptownliving

NoDa (N Davidson St Arts District) Projects

2118 posts in this topic

Edited for content

This is the thread to discuss projects in the NoDa neighborhood of Charlotte. NoDa is a recent name coined to describe the part of Charlotte centered around North Davidson Street and 36th Street that has historically been known as North Charlotte.

--monsoon

Edited by metro.m

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North Davidson reminds me of parts of the inner-city area of Sydney I live in, Glebe (pronounced Gleeb). It's virtually on the edge of the main Sydney CBD, along with many other inner-city suburbs.

Although Glebe is much more urban(e) there are still remnants of the Glebe of yesteryear including an original 70s hippy walking around here and there. It is quite a large area so its style varies but there are certainly examples in NoDa that remind me of examples in my "hood". lol

Yes, the shot with the Charlotte skyline is wonderful. BOM rulz! ;)

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It was not torn down...it was moved to an empty lot down the street.

I do like the proposed building and think it will be a nice addition to NoDa. But I do miss eating at Kelly's with monsoon.

Edited by uptownliving

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Nice! I havn't seen the rendering on that one yet. Do you know anything on the dates on that project?

Also, why did Kelly's decide to close. There are plenty of other mill houses (or the same house) they could have used to to return. New development on your block doesn't mean you have to jump ship. They say Fat City will return after development. I've hung out in NODA on lots of weekends and it certainly seems like it's an area where an establishment with roots would really want to stay.

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monsoon-

I have struggled with that mentality for some time now. I have heard "more innocent times" and "fight the good fight" from many of those I respect in NoDa but feel as though what is happening to NoDa is a bad thing.

Personally, I have come to disagree with the idea. Those "INNOCENT" times were truely innocent for those trying to keep the neighborhood the way it was (low affordable rent for artists and indigenous neighbors), however along with it came an abundance of crack dealing and prostitution. I personally wasn't very excited about the gun battle that took place right down the street from me the FIRST night I moved in. If you really want to talk about sad changes, talk to those that are STILL here. The neighborhood was already changed from the days they were used to when the artists came in and bought up much of the property... and it had not changed for the better.

Since development really started, (2 years ago), have seen much of the violent crime, drug dealing and prostitution deplete. I feel it is much safer now.

I sincerely appreciate the fact that those AGAINST the change in this area have won some major battles here. I hope both sides will work to see their vision through, but enjoy the collaborative effort responsible for making NoDa a truely unique and versatile neighborhood. If one side bails, then that means we as a gropu cannot accept diversity and change. I fear this is a core problem in our society, because everyone wants it to be entirely THEIR way.

I would like to see this area represent all of those that have, do and will live here. However, I do see the need to build the high density developments close to uptown, because as most environmentalists will tell you, urban sprawl is a serious threat.

Thoughts?

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Thats such a great building to replace the Kellys house. It adds additional urban fabric to a district that is really too small right now imo. There needs to be several new pedestrian oriented structures added in all directions from Davidson and 36th. I am of the opinion that neighborhoods evolve for the better or worse. This area became stagnant and the new energy being pumped in can only be for the better. i do hate that Fat City went away. The owner sold out to development, but its good to hear that he is bringing Fat back from the dead.

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Funnily enough, I now feel inspired to visit NoDa one day.

Somebody please purchase a return ticket from Sydney to Charlotte for me. I'll be extremely kind to you, if ya get what I mean!?! B)

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I do feel, although I am pleased to see this building start up, that too many more buildings designed like this and NODA will begin to look like first ward. Don't get me wrong, First Ward is great, for first ward, but not for NODA. If you really want to get down to it, isn't this building a little bland for an arts district. Combine this building, with the colony, Nevitt building and the Renaissance (I'm sure it's mis-spelled but I'm not spell checking). Aren't some of you afraid that what "is" NODA will be washed out and this will in effect kill its edge and the future economic possibilities that that edge can create. I do love first ward, really I do, but let's face it, it's not the type of place young hip artists want to hang out and create in. It's not the type of place young, hip, urban students what to hang out in, be inspired in, etc. Too many more mundane urban buildings and the developers will water down everything that sparked a love for NODA in the first place. NODA can be an incredible and impressive neighborhood but it is so fragile right now that I can't help but worry about it, and yes worry that developers, if not careful, will destroy it for profit. When guest come into town, don't you want to take them to a funky and fresh arts district that can provide them with sights and sounds and feelings they CAN'T get at home. There is more to a neighborhood than "nice" buildings. There are neighborhoods with "cool" buildings, "unique" buildings, "wild" buildings. There is more to creating a neighborhood than just making it "nice". NODA should strive to develop into the neighborhood that makes you say WOW. It should make out of towners say I wish we had a neighborhood like this. But, I fear it's current path is taking it to "nice" and not to be too condescending on Charlotte because you know I love it but, Charlotte seems to have a way to turn everything into "nice", "clean", and "safe". This is an Arts District for crying out loud. Make it LOUD, Charlotte needs to live a little sometimes. If peopel want first ward then they need to move to first ward, if they want family then they need to move to Dilworth. If people want an an arts district filled with diversity and creativity the they should move to NODA and they should be a little more demanding of the developers that propose structures in there neighborhood, believe me, pretty soon NODA will be able to afford to be choosy.

Edited by appatone

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I don't wan't to sound negative but (at times) I just don't know if people fighting for this neighborhood and developing this neighborhood truley know how DYNAMIC this neighborhood really could be. If an artist mindset is really applied to this neighborhood along with strong business and development sense this neighborhood could blossom into a regional showcase. There is soooo much potential but as I said it is so fragile and so young of a neighborhood. I know it's historical and it's old, but it's really just now starting to really grow into what it could become. And I do love this neighborhood.

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Appatone-

I agree with the fact that too many of these buildings will change the face of NoDa. It is unfortunate that NoDa turned down a project that was comprised of garage door faced entryways and corrigated steel/brick facing. Regardless, it is obvious that the residents of the neighborhood have a voice.

In regards to this particular project (Replacing Kelly's Cafe Still), you said it yourself that there are only three complexes (including this particular building) that have the bland look you mention. IMO, I don't think the commercial building in the Colonies that faces N. Davidson exactly reflects the First Ward and do not feel they should be included in this group. It seems to reflect the NoDa Lofts (which is an original building) more than First Ward. Still, go ahead and include the Colonies in this group. Look how far apart these complexes are and look at the buildings and houses between them. There is plenty of old in between the new, which TRUELY adds to the diversity of this area. There are also plenty of undeveloped, vacant warehouses and mills that have yet to be rennovated. So, I think this neighborhood will be just fine and will remain the most unique area in our city.

You should also look at who is going to build this particular building (Crosland). Then look at their other projects (The Nevitt Building & Fat City). These projects do and will not look anything like this one that is replacing Kelly's. They certainly reflect the history of the neighborhood. So, obviously the builders are not set out to create ONLY this style of building. On the flip side, they are not setting out to ONLY create buildings that reflect the past.

I understand your worries, but again, I think we will be just fine. The neighbors do not want an area that consists of only one type of building and a bunch of franchises.

Last, someone corrected my statement about ripping Kelly's down and mentioned that they moved it. This is true, but it is now falling apart (apparently). So, they pretty much ripped it down!

Edited by jolive

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Well to each their own. I think it works and it is reflective of the area's history. I would like to see some more funky architecture. Maybe we will see something different with Fat City.

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As I said, to each their own. I am curious, what types of places do you like to visit in Charlotte? Do you not like The Neighborhood Theatre or the Evening Muse? Do you not like the gallery crawls? They are still there. What would bring you back? I like to know these things, since I live there.

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you can find the same bland building style all over Charlotte

Exactly, and I believe mediocre is a fair word to describe these buildings. I was only trying to give a little constructive critism as I believe Metro is doing. But I believe too many of these buildings and NODA will be a fairly bland neighborhood.

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I agree that NoDa has lost some of its "edge" which is what made it succusful in the first place. I also agree that Crosland was rather cheap on the Nevitt Buidling. I know that Crosland and the NoDa neighborhood association have a rough relationship, to the point of calling each other obscenities.. While the association is glad that new things are being developed, they are not happy with what Crosland is doing. They really are having to battle with them just to bring the stuff to market you have seen. You don't want to know what Crosland would have built if the neighborhood association had just rubber stamped their plans.

I do think that the L34 building is going to be better than the Nevitt building. One can only hope they will build on L34 to make the Fat City redevelopment something quite neat.

On a brighter note I do think that the Highland Mill redevelopment is really going to add a lot to the neighborhood. If you have some time, go by the leasing office and take a tour of the place...especially interesting is the section in the back closest to the railroad tracks.

Edited by uptownliving

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88029184668.jpg

Edgy townhouses to go up near NoDa

Condo developer plans affordable units near arts district, rail stop

DOUG SMITH

Two of the most recognizable names in Charlotte condo development are teaming for the first time to do an edgy project about five blocks from the heart of NoDa.

Ray "Rip" Farris III of Tuscan Development plans to start preparing a site at 36th Street and Wesley Avenue in two weeks for NoDa18, six penthouses and 12 townhouses designed by David Furman's architectural firm.

Furman, whose Boulevard Centro also develops condos, said he accepts third-party design work "for people who have a mission similar to ours."

Farris fits in that category.

"He wants to do unique projects in areas that are urban in context," Furman said. "He likes to use his projects as a catalyst for developing and revitalizing neighborhoods."

NoDa18 is within walking distance of the North Davidson-East 36th Street intersection, the focal point of the former mill village's resurgence.

The revitalization movement was led by actors, dancers and artists, who reclaimed old houses and helped create a trendy arts district. In recent years, office and apartment developers have joined in.

"There's just so much creative energy in that neighborhood, and it started grass roots," Farris said.

In the spirit of the revitalization pioneers, NoDa18 will be offbeat, with tall windows, corrugated metal panels and masonry on the exterior, and open, airy spaces inside.

Furman's Alexander Court at East 10th and North Alexander streets in First Ward's Garden District is similar in scale and design to three-story NoDa18, said Steve Barton of David Furman Architecture.

Alexander Court's red balconies and trim are unusual, but perhaps not as funky as NoDa18's exterior, which will have a slightly industrial look, he said.

NoDa18 will face 36th Street and wrap around the Wesley corner with an architectural tower. A garden and parking spaces will be in the rear. Soft light in varied colors will bathe the building at night.

Farris said 850- to 900-square-foot units are selling for $125,000 to $140,000, a range he believes will appeal to buyers earning $32,000 a year or more.

The $2.8 million development is within a light-rail transit corridor, so residents someday will be able to walk five blocks to a station, he said.

The neighborhood traces its roots to the early 1900s when homes and businesses sprang up around the Highland Manufacturing Co. New businesses and churches flocked to the area, served in those days by a trolley.

In recent years, NoDa's popularity has attracted apartment and condo developers, pushing home prices much higher than the $20,000 that many urban pioneers were paying in the 1970s.

Catherine Browning of First Charlotte Properties, which is handling NoDa18 sales, said 14 residential properties sold in NoDa in 1999 at an average price of $102,000. From June 2003 through June 2004, she said, 39 sold at an average of $134,000.

Tuscan Development, owned by Farris and business partner Martin Kerr, expects to complete NoDa18 by mid-summer 2005.

Farris said construction on the 0.8-acre site will start when half the units are sold. Structura, a general contracting firm owned by Farris and Kerr and managed by Kerr, will build it.

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