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Coleco

Possible way to save urban schools

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http://www.mlive.com/news/kzgazette/index....kz_tuition.html

It doesn't get any better than this folks. Four years to a state college or university free for students who attend K-12 schools in Kalamazoo. Even those there only four years get 65 percent of tuition and fees covered.

Now, GR needs its philanthropic community to step up and do the same. Where'd the Kazoo money come from? My hunch is former Stryker CEO John Brown, who quietly entered the world's richest people list a few years back and continues to live a humble life in Kalamazoo driving a Ford.

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This is absolutely incredible. It will be interesting watching the implications of this. Will people want to move into the city? Will the urban real estate values skyrocket? This is like paying each family in the city $40,000 for each child. How long can this promise last? WOW :yahoo:

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This is absolutely incredible. It will be interesting watching the implications of this. Will people want to move into the city? Will the urban real estate values skyrocket? This is like paying each family in the city $40,000 for each child. How long can this promise last? WOW :yahoo:

$40k might be a bit much. GVSU is only $6500 or so per year. I heard on the news that it was garunteed until at least the class of 2018.

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I'm amazed that they can do this. Kalamazoo has 11,099 students currently enrolled (www.greatschools.com) x at least $25,000 (4 years public university tuition) = $277,475,000. But that is the total # of students CURRENTLY enrolled. Through 2018, figure about 1000 students added to the rolls/year, and figure the cost of education going up over that 13 year period (at least doubling, if not tripling). You're talking close to $1 billion. :huh: Who in Kzoo has $1 billion sitting around, or $250 million for that matter. Even in a trust fund earning healthy interest, I don't see how it will work. It would be interesting to see the numbers.

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I'm amazed that they can do this. Kalamazoo has 11,099 students currently enrolled (www.greatschools.com) x at least $25,000 (4 years public university tuition) = $277,475,000. But that is the total # of students CURRENTLY enrolled. Through 2018, figure about 1000 students added to the rolls/year, and figure the cost of education going up over that 13 year period (at least doubling, if not tripling). You're talking close to $1 billion. :huh: Who in Kzoo has $1 billion sitting around, or $250 million for that matter. Even in a trust fund earning healthy interest, I don't see how it will work. It would be interesting to see the numbers.

Yeah, but youve gotta figure that only a small percentage of kids there have been going to k-zoo schools from kindergarten all the way through 12th grade. I can see this getting quite controversial.

What about some poor kid whos been there since first grade? why should he get not get a dime for college when some rich kid who doesnt need the help gets to go for free because he went to kindergarten there and the other kid didn't? It will be very interesting to see how it all works out. Add to that, some of the kids who get free college are going to waste it and flunk out anyways, some kids who don't get anything might be on the deans list, and everything else that could possibly happen....wow.

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Who in Kzoo has $1 billion sitting around, or $250 million for that matter.

From Fark.com:

A few very wealthy Kalamazoo Families:

- The Upjon Family (owns Whirpool Appliances).

- The Stryker Family (owns Stryker Products, medical supplies, Several

billionaires still in town)

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It's hard to find a downside to this. Read the fine print. Your kid ONLY needs to attend KPS for 4 years to be eligible for 65 percent tuition and fees. If anyone complains about "only getting" 65-95 percent of their tuition paid, they sure know how to look a gift horse in the mouth.

Bottom line: Hundreds, maybe thousands, of kids will go to college who NEVER would have gone before.

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I didn't say it was a bad idea, I just can't figure out the math to make it happen. Maybe like someone mentioned, that they are going to prepay college tuition through 529 plans for all the students? Even a group of billionaires though do not usually have $250,000,000 sitting around. It just means their assets over liabilities = $1 billion. It is earth-shattering if it works. I wonder if they will have measurables in order for kids to qualify or continue getting money in college, other than just STAYING in college.

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I wonder if they will have measurables in order for kids to qualify or continue getting money in college, other than just STAYING in college.

4 continuous years max. Must have a 2.0 and maintain 12 credit hours.

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I like the sounds of the program, but this comment by WOODTV:

"That means the so-called housing bubble in Kalamazoo won't burst.".

is irresponsible journalism at best, and would probably land you in court if you worked in real estate.

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WoodTV has a good article on it at thier website

applause.gif

This is what I am talking about. Michigan...THE STATE...needs to be just as ahead of the curve and inovative as the city of Kalamazoo (Universal Health Care as an example). Unfortunately, you will get the cries of the Macarthiest claiming that this is socialism.

Take a page from Irerland and how it turned its economy around....FREE EDUCATION for all

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Take a page from Irerland and how it turned its economy around....FREE EDUCATION for all

I think thier tax policy reletive to the rest of europe had a great deal to do with it as well. Microsoft and the other tech companies didnt come for the free education.

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I don't see a downside to this either, it will encourage economic growth in Kalamazoo, there is a good chance, that with that, and the residual affect that comes with population growth, Kzoo could pass GR in stature. It's more than just urban schools. It's revitalization. That's kind of what this expieriment is. And $250,000,000 would be a running total, not a year by year basis. Last year not even five hundred students Graduated from Kalamazoo Schools.

Imagine if something like that happened in Grand Rapids. That could be a blessing to our beleagured school system, not to mention, help stabalize the cities tax base. It would also encourage more private investment to happen in the city, as the labor capitol increased!

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I don't know, I think you guys may be getting over-exuberant about this :whistling: I, for one, am not packing my bags to move to Kalamazoo, even if it meant free college for my kids.

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The good thing is that there is a good chance that the city will have a great chance at gaining population, increased tax base, etc. Opportunities for all kinds of revitalization, infill and really responsible building are enormous. The cries of socialism may not be very loud either, since my understanding is that its being funded by local philanthropists instead of MY TAX DOLLARS. :P

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I don't see a downside to this either.

I potentially do. All public universities are free in Argentina. The downside is that high school students need not pursue scholarships, and little importance is placed on one's high school grades. Simply put, very little is acomplished in secondary school. And even during the summer months, none of the young people seek jobs. Their future (or at least a few years of it) is already paid for. Why work harder than you have to, right?

However, given the higher expectations that already exist, I am hoping that attitude won't gain too large of a following here.

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I potentially do. All public universities are free in Argentina. The downside is that high school students need not pursue scholarships, and little importance is placed on one's high school grades. Simply put, very little is acomplished in secondary school. And even during the summer months, none of the young people seek jobs. Their future (or at least a few years of it) is already paid for. Why work harder than you have to, right?

However, given the higher expectations that already exist, I am hoping that attitude won't gain too large of a following here.

I would assume the students would still need to have decent grades, because they still need to do well enough to get admitted to a state school, and nowadays the GPA needed is around 2.5 or maybe even lower. You're right though, for some, there will be no point in trying for scholarships or any kind of financial assistance. Just get good enough grades to be admitted and you're home free.

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I would assume the students would still need to have decent grades, because they still need to do well enough to get admitted to a state school

I has gotten increasingly harder to get into GVSU and other state schools..

Fall 2004 Freshman Student @ GVSU Profile:

Middle 50% scored between:

* 3.3 and 3.8 High School G.P.A.

* 21 and 26 Composite ACT

For admitted freshman Fall 2005 @ MSU, the middle 50% ranges are:

High School GPA: 3.3-3.8

ACT composite score: 22-27

SAT combined score: 1040-1260

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I don't see a downside for the current students there. It's an awesome gift and I hope they all take advantage of it and return the philanthropic attitude back to the community. But after watching the city leaders there last night on WOODTV in alll their glea and impossible predictions of growth, I have a few points regarding one of their statements:

Companies will want to locate there because of the education level of its population.

OK, maybe. But if the KPS only graduates 500 - 700 kids per year, these kids are going to take their scholarship money and either go to WMU, KVCC or another State school. Even 500 added students to Western's 40,000+ enrollment is nothing. They fluctuate up and down that much every semester. And then there is no guarantee these students will stay in the area.

Western and many schools now require above a 3.0 to get in. Western I think is up to 3.2 or 3.3. I don't know KPS's stats, but that's probably the top 30% or smaller making that cut.

WOODTV also brought up a similar program in Oregon, which came with BIG STRINGS attached. Students were expected to follow certain "character" models, like they interviewed one kid who won't get his scholarship because he is openly gay, and they are also expected to have a dress code, etc.. (Yes, in liberal Oregon). Any LARGE GIFT usually comes with LARGE STRINGS attached.

And then an article in the Press this morning interviewing parents said that even if that were offered in GR, that they would still not go back to the GRPS system.

Just some thoughts.

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