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skylinefan

Preserving Norfolk's Black heritage.

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Hello Fellow Forumers, I read in today's Pilot that Norfolk State University is considering tearing down Norfolk's first black Hospital Norfolk Community. I was born in this hospital in 1961 in a time when blacks were barred from Norfolk General now Sentara Norfolk General. I think this building should be maintained and possibly turned into a museum of African American history.

I am very happy that the city saw fit to perserve the Crispus Attucks theater on Church St., but I am dismayed that so much of Norfolk's significant African American buildings have either been felled to the wrecking ball or have been allowed to deteriate to the point that they have to be torn down.

I would like to get some feedback from other forumers on what should be done and what we can do to ensure that more of black Norfolk's heritage is maintained. New condos, office buildings and shops are nice but what really defines a city is its cultural heritage.

Here the link to the article:

http://home.hamptonroads.com/stories/story...5460&ran=239786

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Hello Fellow Forumers, I read in today's Pilot that Norfolk State University is considering tearing down Norfolk's first black Hospital Norfolk Community. I was born in this hospital in 1961 in a time when blacks were barred from Norfolk General now Sentara Norfolk General. I think this building should be maintained and possibly turned into a museum of African American history.

I am very happy that the city saw fit to perserve the Crispus Attucks theater on Church St., but I am dismayed that so much of Norfolk's significant African American buildings have either been felled to the wrecking ball or have been allowed to deteriate to the point that they have to be torn down.

I would like to get some feedback from other forumers on what should be done and what we can do to ensure that more of black Norfolk's heritage is maintained. New condos, office buildings and shops are nice but what really defines a city is its cultural heritage.

Here the link to the article:

http://home.hamptonroads.com/stories/story...5460&ran=239786

I understand your feeling, however I don't think that it is just the african american buildings and area have been bulldozed. Almost 75% of downtown has been bulldozed.

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I understand your feeling, however I don't think that it is just the african american buildings and area have been bulldozed. Almost 75% of downtown has been bulldozed.

I agree urbanfan it is not just the african american buildings that have been demolished. It just seems to me that this city has been going out of its way to "revitalize" black neighborhoods out of existence. Some in this forum are too young to remember the "redevelopment" of east Ghent. The city in the 60's and 70's promised the black residents of the east Ghent that when they finished "revitalizing" thier neighborhood that they would be able to move back. Turned out that east Ghent was "revitalized" into an upper income predominately white neighborhood. For black people my age and older memories of east Ghent continue to haunt and anger us.

Norfolk appears to be getting better at perserving its heritage both black and white. I do wonder though what will happen to the First Baptist Church of Norfolk and St. John's AME church both on Bute St. once Downtown redevelopment washes over them. In 10 years will anyone even remember what this area use to be? I am happy that Downtown Norfolk is on a role it is something that I have been following and hoping for since I was a child, but in the city's zeal to "revitalize" I hope they do not forget its historical heritage both black and white. I do think the city understands this now.

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is it architecturally significant?... also, is there no where else that NSU can build a similar building?

NSU is running out of room and the hospital is in very, I mean very poor shape. That is the main reason it closed. NSU needs to fix up alot of their buildings. They are in poor shape. But they are working on it. I've been everywhere on NSU's campus and can take you around blind folded.

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It's a shame that a building that has played such a fundamental role in Norfolk's black community (especially during segregation) will be razed. From the celebrations of life, to the mourning of death......

You'd be surprised at how from you can bring a building back from....don't forget we're humans, not robots or calculators... there should be more than $$$ factored into a building's fate.

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is it architecturally significant?... also, is there no where else that NSU can build a similar building?

Yes it is wrldcoupe4, the building was the first hospital financed, built and run by blacks. It was also one of the few black hospitals in the nation that had this distinction.

I guess I am a little emotional about this issue because I was born at Norfolk Community and my father use to perform dental procedures there.

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NSU controls the building and they say its beyond repair and usefullness. Paul Riddick seems to agree. I'm sure they tried their best to save it.

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Yes it is wrldcoupe4, the building was the first hospital financed, built and run by blacks. It was also one of the few black hospitals in the nation that had this distinction.

I guess I am a little emotional about this issue because I was born at Norfolk Community and my father use to perform dental procedures there.

What I think coupe means is the design of the building. Not what the history of the building. I understand what you feel since you were born there. That would be like me hearing that Depaul is being torn down but the building is ugly and nasty. When was the last time you were in there. It is in awful shape. The building is just ugly. I was in it when they tried to fix it. They spent some money on it too! What a waste of money to do all of that and then say they are going to demo it though. NSU wastes soooo much money its outrageous. I worked out there doing telecommunications for 2 years and they blew so much money on stupid stuff that could have helped the school out. I was in Brown Hall when that dude got shot @ noon time.

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What I think coupe means is the design of the building. Not what the history of the building. I understand what you feel since you were born there. That would be like me hearing that Depaul is being torn down but the building is ugly and nasty. When was the last time you were in there. It is in awful shape. The building is just ugly. I was in it when they tried to fix it. They spent some money on it too! What a waste of money to do all of that and then say they are going to demo it though. NSU wastes soooo much money its outrageous. I worked out there doing telecommunications for 2 years and they blew so much money on stupid stuff that could have helped the school out. I was in Brown Hall when that dude got shot @ noon time.

Sorry Russ, your right, coupe did ask is it architecturally significant, I must have read the post too quickly. I have not been inside that building since my grandmother was in there in 1983 when it was still a working hospital. I agree NSU should not have renovated the building only to tear it down. Strikes me as a waste of money too. I hope once they have completed tearing down the building that some type of plaque be placed there recognizing what use to stand there.

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I think that the city needs to step in and give the University assistance in restoring the building. This has just as much significance as the Attucks Theater!!!

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I think that the city needs to step in and give the University assistance in restoring the building. This has just as much significance as the Attucks Theater!!!

Not really :rolleyes: I've been in it recently and like I said it in VERY BAD SHAPE. This was built in the 50's or 60's not the 1900's.

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Sorry, I had to pull my foot out of my mouth! :rofl:

If the building is too far gone and it's not worth saving than of course ir should be demolished. Its a shame though!

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well it was established in 1915 but moved a few times..:

"A Public Works Act grant allowed it to move to a new 65-bed facility on Corprew Avenue in 1939. Associated with Howard University College of Medicine, Norfolk State College and Hampton Institute, Norfolk Community Hospital received approval from the American College of Surgeons in 1939 as an accredited institution. It continued its progress in the 1950s becoming the first hospital in the city to appoint a medical director and a recovery room.e city to appoint a medical director and a recovery room.

It also operated a successful outpatient clinic. A new 88-bed addition was added on May 13, 1967. Because of changes in the Medicare and Medicaid programs and competition with local hospitals, the Norfolk Community Hospital financial troubles climaxed, forcing it to close its doors as a hospital in 1998."

Norfolk Community Hosptial

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well it was established in 1915 but moved a few times..:

"A Public Works Act grant allowed it to move to a new 65-bed facility on Corprew Avenue in 1939. Associated with Howard University College of Medicine, Norfolk State College and Hampton Institute, Norfolk Community Hospital received approval from the American College of Surgeons in 1939 as an accredited institution. It continued its progress in the 1950s becoming the first hospital in the city to appoint a medical director and a recovery room.e city to appoint a medical director and a recovery room.

It also operated a successful outpatient clinic. A new 88-bed addition was added on May 13, 1967. Because of changes in the Medicare and Medicaid programs and competition with local hospitals, the Norfolk Community Hospital financial troubles climaxed, forcing it to close its doors as a hospital in 1998."

Norfolk Community Hosptial

I know that the buliding is quite rough in shape... but sometimes it's worth it in terms of historical value. I'm not entirely well-versed in its historical value to the city of Norfolk, but it's got good bones to it... I wish NSU could utilize it somehow, either as a dormitory or perhaps a joint medical program with EVMS or something? I'm a total history buff in terms of architecture and this building has a story to it, i.e. the Royster Building (LOVE IT).

*sigh*

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well it was established in 1915 but moved a few times..:

"A Public Works Act grant allowed it to move to a new 65-bed facility on Corprew Avenue in 1939. Associated with Howard University College of Medicine, Norfolk State College and Hampton Institute, Norfolk Community Hospital received approval from the American College of Surgeons in 1939 as an accredited institution. It continued its progress in the 1950s becoming the first hospital in the city to appoint a medical director and a recovery room.e city to appoint a medical director and a recovery room.

It also operated a successful outpatient clinic. A new 88-bed addition was added on May 13, 1967. Because of changes in the Medicare and Medicaid programs and competition with local hospitals, the Norfolk Community Hospital financial troubles climaxed, forcing it to close its doors as a hospital in 1998."

Norfolk Community Hosptial

Thanks for the background information wrldcoupe4.

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well it was established in 1915 but moved a few times..:

"A Public Works Act grant allowed it to move to a new 65-bed facility on Corprew Avenue in 1939. Associated with Howard University College of Medicine, Norfolk State College and Hampton Institute, Norfolk Community Hospital received approval from the American College of Surgeons in 1939 as an accredited institution. It continued its progress in the 1950s becoming the first hospital in the city to appoint a medical director and a recovery room.e city to appoint a medical director and a recovery room.

It also operated a successful outpatient clinic. A new 88-bed addition was added on May 13, 1967. Because of changes in the Medicare and Medicaid programs and competition with local hospitals, the Norfolk Community Hospital financial troubles climaxed, forcing it to close its doors as a hospital in 1998."

Norfolk Community Hosptial

Thanks for the information wrldcoupe4. Maybe someone should start a thread in the Richmond forum about preserving Richmond's rich African American History. I would really like to know more about efforts to revitalize Richmond's Jackson Ward and Church Hill. Just a thought!

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I know that the buliding is quite rough in shape... but sometimes it's worth it in terms of historical value. I'm not entirely well-versed in its historical value to the city of Norfolk, but it's got good bones to it... I wish NSU could utilize it somehow, either as a dormitory or perhaps a joint medical program with EVMS or something? I'm a total history buff in terms of architecture and this building has a story to it, i.e. the Royster Building (LOVE IT).

*sigh*

I love that building too, it's an architectual gem, as is the Attucks!

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One would think it could be saved. I couldn't see whether or not the tower was still extant in the picture. Is it still there?

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