Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

krazeeboi

Does Columbia have an identity?

Recommended Posts


Did Raleigh before RTP, did Austin before Dell, did CLT before BOA, Houston before oil. I think the "identitiy" of Columbia will come. On a regional level it is known as the Capital of SC, USC, and 2 hours from the beach :thumbsup: . But I think the cities identity will come. It is still really early in the movement of the populas from the north to the south and west. I think Columbia is in a good position to make a name for itself. Howmany cities are aggressively pursuing hydrogen cell research? Not saying that Columbia is the only city but it is one of the few, and being that USC has the best "hydrogen research" programs in the country I think it would be natural for Columbia to be known for hydrogen from computer batteries, car engines/hybrid, to the east coast "hydrogen highway". If there is one thing I'm sure of Columbia will very soon see its time come!

The city has a can do attitude. That speaks volumes just ask CLT, RDU, Austin, hell and even Huntsville, AL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really...Nobody out of the state knows about Columbia, or atleast can't name one thing to link Columbia with except being the capital...Maybe our neighborhing states can but no one else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most cities with a strong identity benefit from one or more of these factors: culture, geography, and history. You can see all three factors in play in the identities of cities like Charleston, Savannah, New Orleans, and Memphis. Other cities benefit from one or two of these factors, like Birmingham, Nashville, Richmond, and so on. For cities that don't have any of these three factors working in their favor, an identity usually comes about due to growth and economic development/corporate presence (only a few cities have ALL of these benefits, such as NYC, Boston, Miami, etc.). Even then, many cities seem to struggle in their identites. I think Atlanta's branding campaign shows some evidence of this. I know some Raleighites feel as though their city lacks a strong identity, despite the growth and economic development of that area; the same can even be said of Charlotte. This is why I included as a subtitle "Is it even important?" I think that cities should focus first and foremost on economic development and quality of life issues; let the "identity" follow.

Also, I find it interesting that while many of us think that Columbia is lagging in the "identity" department, some outsiders actually have positive things to say about the city, such as it is a "classic looking" capital city, USC's downtown presence is a plus, and things of that nature. On another message board, one guy in Greensboro actually said that he gets a good sense of identity in Columbia. And I really think that the city has some of the greatest neighborhoods for a city its size (and some outsiders have agreed). So I don't think we should sell the capital city short. Of course it's no Charleston or New Orleans, but I think the city is doing OK as far as identity is concerned, which really shouldn't be a direct focus anyway, but more of a by-product of a city's hard work in establishing/redefining itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It already has one...a capital city in a dynamic state. It might not mean much now but in time that will pay big dividends. I think Raleigh never used the "capital" identity because of RTP. No disrespect to the other two metros but I truly believe Columbia can create some elbow room and set itselt apart. There is nothing wrong with using what you got. What I mean is my hometown identity is Army...all day, 365 days of the year +one on leap year. I see nothing wrong with that because it pays the bills sort of speak. It may not be glamorous but hey at least there is something to proclaim to the world. As for if it matters; I say yes. It gives the residents something to "identify" with.

Some other cities with identities...Norfolk=Navy, Denver=Rocky mountains(or legalized THC), High Point=furniture get my drift. These cities used what was there and that has became their calling card.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because of a new approach the Columbia Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau is embarking on (that is marketing the area as destination as opposed to just booking meetings), and because of USC's new innovation district, Columbia's identity is about to become one of a high-tech southern capital city on a river that is full of friendly people, research, green space, business opportunities, culture, entertainment and recreation.

The Three Rivers Music Festival's move to the Congaree River spanning the Gervais Street bridge with the skyline as a backdrop will go a very long way in making the festival a signature event. The view of Columbia from the West Columbia Riverwalk looks like a signature for Columbia in and of itself.

While Charleston has it over Columbia in culture during Spoleto (Some of the best acts at Spoleto are from Columbia.) and in its visual arts year-round, Columbia has it all over Charleston in the performing arts from the ballet to modern dance to the symphony to opera to staged theater. And the Columbia Museum of Art is the largest fine art museum in the state while the State Museum is the largest museum in the state period. And McKissick is in a special league of museums on a national scale, even though it has scaled back. And Trustus Theatre is the only professional theatre in S.C. Columbia is fast becoming a real life urban city, not a fish bowl like Charleston and not a Main Street like Greenville.

Columbia's design gives it a graceful, elegant and classical ambience, and its mix of architecture from antebellum to highrises to neoclassical midrises make the statement that our past, present and future are all equal players in who we are and in what we want our visitors and future residents to experience. Our forestry and topography provide a lush setting that may cities would kill for.

By the way, I received an invitation to the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hilton Hotel and the rendering of the hotel on the front of the invitation shows architectural details not shown in any other rendering I've seen. The details give it more style and soften it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most cities with a strong identity benefit from one or more of these factors: culture, geography, and history. You can see all three factors in play in the identities of cities like Charleston, Savannah, New Orleans, and Memphis. Other cities benefit from one or two of these factors, like Birmingham, Nashville, Richmond, and so on. For cities that don't have any of these three factors working in their favor, an identity usually comes about due to growth and economic development/corporate presence (only a few cities have ALL of these benefits, such as NYC, Boston, Miami, etc.). Even then, many cities seem to struggle in their identites. I think Atlanta's branding campaign shows some evidence of this. I know some Raleighites feel as though their city lacks a strong identity, despite the growth and economic development of that area; the same can even be said of Charlotte. This is why I included as a subtitle "Is it even important?" I think that cities should focus first and foremost on economic development and quality of life issues; let the "identity" follow.

Also, I find it interesting that while many of us think that Columbia is lagging in the "identity" department, some outsiders actually have positive things to say about the city, such as it is a "classic looking" capital city, USC's downtown presence is a plus, and things of that nature. On another message board, one guy in Greensboro actually said that he gets a good sense of identity in Columbia. And I really think that the city has some of the greatest neighborhoods for a city its size (and some outsiders have agreed). So I don't think we should sell the capital city short. Of course it's no Charleston or New Orleans, but I think the city is doing OK as far as identity is concerned, which really shouldn't be a direct focus anyway, but more of a by-product of a city's hard work in establishing/redefining itself.

I can agree, cities like Charlotte are booming but it's a new city and it really doesn't have an identity yet when compared to cities like N.O and Charleston. But I think in time cola will defintely have national name for it's self. Especially when all the developments downtown takes shape and innovista. Hydrogen fuel is probally going to give us big city status in the next 20-30 yrs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because of a new approach the Columbia Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau is embarking on (that is marketing the area as destination as opposed to just booking meetings), and because of USC's new innovation district, Columbia's identity is about to become one of a high-tech southern capital city on a river that is full of friendly people, research, green space, business opportunities, culture, entertainment and recreation.

The Three Rivers Music Festival's move to the Congaree River spanning the Gervais Street bridge with the skyline as a backdrop will go a very long way in making the festival a signature event. The view of Columbia from the West Columbia Riverwalk looks like a signature for Columbia in and of itself.

While Charleston has it over Columbia in culture during Spoleto (Some of the best acts at Spoleto are from Columbia.) and in its visual arts year-round, Columbia has it all over Charleston in the performing arts from the ballet to modern dance to the symphony to opera to staged theater. And the Columbia Museum of Art is the largest fine art museum in the state while the State Museum is the largest museum in the state period. And McKissick is in a special league of museums on a national scale, even though it has scaled back. And Trustus Theatre is the only professional theatre in S.C. Columbia is fast becoming a real life urban city, not a fish bowl like Charleston and not a Main Street like Greenville.

Columbia's design gives it a graceful, elegant and classical ambience, and its mix of architecture from antebellum to highrises to neoclassical midrises make the statement that our past, present and future are all equal players in who we are and in what we want our visitors and future residents to experience. Our forestry and topography provide a lush setting that may cities would kill for.

By the way, I received an invitation to the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hilton Hotel and the rendering of the hotel on the front of the invitation shows architectural details not shown in any other rendering I've seen. The details give it more style and soften it.

Awesome post, Corqi; Is there any way that you could scan the rendering and share it with us? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because of a new approach the Columbia Metropolitan Convention and Visitors Bureau is embarking on (that is marketing the area as destination as opposed to just booking meetings), and because of USC's new innovation district, Columbia's identity is about to become one of a high-tech southern capital city on a river that is full of friendly people, research, green space, business opportunities, culture, entertainment and recreation.

The Three Rivers Music Festival's move to the Congaree River spanning the Gervais Street bridge with the skyline as a backdrop will go a very long way in making the festival a signature event. The view of Columbia from the West Columbia Riverwalk looks like a signature for Columbia in and of itself.

While Charleston has it over Columbia in culture during Spoleto (Some of the best acts at Spoleto are from Columbia.) and in its visual arts year-round, Columbia has it all over Charleston in the performing arts from the ballet to modern dance to the symphony to opera to staged theater. And the Columbia Museum of Art is the largest fine art museum in the state while the State Museum is the largest museum in the state period. And McKissick is in a special league of museums on a national scale, even though it has scaled back. And Trustus Theatre is the only professional theatre in S.C. Columbia is fast becoming a real life urban city, not a fish bowl like Charleston and not a Main Street like Greenville.

Columbia's design gives it a graceful, elegant and classical ambience, and its mix of architecture from antebellum to highrises to neoclassical midrises make the statement that our past, present and future are all equal players in who we are and in what we want our visitors and future residents to experience. Our forestry and topography provide a lush setting that may cities would kill for.

By the way, I received an invitation to the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hilton Hotel and the rendering of the hotel on the front of the invitation shows architectural details not shown in any other rendering I've seen. The details give it more style and soften it.

That is good news, and very interesting! Could you pssibly describe what is on there that is substantially different from the images we have shown above? Specifcially, is there any street level retail like the beige/sandstone-colored image we had or is it more like the brick one, with lots of grass, and no visable street level caf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is good news, and very interesting! Could you pssibly describe what is on there that is substantially different from the images we have shown above? Specifcially, is there any street level retail like the beige/sandstone-colored image we had or is it more like the brick one, with lots of grass, and no visable street level caf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...While Charleston has it over Columbia in culture during Spoleto (Some of the best acts at Spoleto are from Columbia.) and in its visual arts year-round, Columbia has it all over Charleston in the performing arts from the ballet to modern dance to the symphony to opera to staged theater. And the Columbia Museum of Art is the largest fine art museum in the state while the State Museum is the largest museum in the state period...Columbia is fast becoming a real life urban city, not a fish bowl like Charleston and not a Main Street like Greenville...

Hmm...ever hear of the Gibbes Art Museum? How about the Charleston Museum, the first and oldest municipal museum in the country? The South Carolina Aquarium? I think those at least compete in terms of excellence with Cola's offerings of museums and art. As far as performing arts, I have to disagree here. Chas can be perceived as surpassing Cola here such as with the Charleston Symphony Orchestra; it sells out concerts. Many different operas and ballets are performed not just DT at the Gailliard Auditorium, but also in the new Charleston Area Performing Arts and Convention Center near the airport. Other cultural offerings are given through improv comedy with the Have Nots! at the American Theater. Of course, let's not forget the plays and ballets performed at one of the first and oldest theaters in the U.S., the Dock Street theater.

Cola has great cultural amenities, but Chas has those same amenities that are at the very least comparable with Cola's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just returned from the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hilton Hotel. A Ruth's Chris representative from Atlanta was there. The restaurant is definite. It was a centerpiece in almost all the speeches given.

I just returned from the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hilton Hotel. A Ruth's Chris representative from Atlanta was there. The restaurant is definite. It was a centerpiece in almost all the speeches given.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm...ever hear of the Gibbes Art Museum? How about the Charleston Museum, the first and oldest municipal museum in the country? The South Carolina Aquarium? I think those at least compete in terms of excellence with Cola's offerings of museums and art. As far as performing arts, I have to disagree here. Chas can be perceived as surpassing Cola here such as with the Charleston Symphony Orchestra; it sells out concerts. Many different operas and ballets are performed not just DT at the Gailliard Auditorium, but also in the new Charleston Area Performing Arts and Convention Center near the airport. Other cultural offerings are given through improv comedy with the Have Nots! at the American Theater. Of course, let's not forget the plays and ballets performed at one of the first and oldest theaters in the U.S., the Dock Street theater.

Cola has great cultural amenities, but Chas has those same amenities that are at the very least comparable with Cola's.

The Columbia City Ballet has no serious competition in the Southeastern US and certainly not in South Carolina. Staged theatre here sets the standard. The zoo offers more overall than the aquarium, including an aquarium, and at a more reasonable price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Columbia City Ballet has no serious competition in the Southeastern US and certainly not in South Carolina. Staged theatre here sets the standard. The zoo offers more overall than the aquarium, including an aquarium, and at a more reasonable price.

Actually, I forgot to mention this, Chas has its own zoo...not with just the aquarium, but the animal forest in Charles Towne Landing. The state park is currently undergoing a significant renovation as well as the zoo. I will say this, Riverbanks promotes itself as a major zoo, and I wish the Landing made strides to do that as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just returned from the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hilton Hotel. A Ruth's Chris representative from Atlanta was there. The restaurant is definite. It was a centerpiece in almost all the speeches given.

I just returned from the groundbreaking ceremony for the Hilton Hotel. A Ruth's Chris representative from Atlanta was there. The restaurant is definite. It was a centerpiece in almost all the speeches given.

Good news worth repeating. :thumbsup:

I love Charles Towne Landing. Some of my fondest memories of Charleston are there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Columbia City Ballet has no serious competition in the Southeastern US and certainly not in South Carolina. Staged theatre here sets the standard. The zoo offers more overall than the aquarium, including an aquarium, and at a more reasonable price.

The December 2005 edition of Southern Living magazine has a special inset for its South Carolina readers with an excellent article about the Columbia City Ballet. It's the real deal, folks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The December 2005 edition of Southern Living magazine has a special inset for its South Carolina readers with an excellent article about the Columbia City Ballet. It's the real deal, folks.

Corgi is right, the Columbia City Ballet is in the top tier of American Ballet Companies. It is definitely a key player in the arts scene here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.