Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

803metlife

Why does SC have the highest unemployment rate

Recommended Posts

There has been alot of emphasis on how the state is ranked higher than the nations unemployment rate. How does everyone think things have gotten the way they are. And who's to blame. Alot of people point the finger at Mark Sanford, but from my understanding I've heard we've always had a losy job force. Another issue is how our high unemployment rates have most college graduates eyeing the job force in neighboring states. I know more than 10 people alone that has move to Atl in the last 2 months. What can we do as a state to play catch up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I think the problem is that much of our economy is based in manufacturing one form or another, and many of those jobs are being shipped overseas. Part of the natural evolution of industrialized nations is to shed the old economic base to the developing countries which allows the newer forms to move in. I think SC is still stuck trying to preserve what is here more than it is trying to bring in the new technologies.

I don't think its Mark Sandord's fault at all. I find his approach to the economy to be pretty hands-off, which lets the economy do what it would do naturally. SC is definately in a transitional period, so who knows where it will go. I am hoping that USC and Clemson's respective technology campuses will help push SC into a different job base.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There has been alot of emphasis on how the state is ranked higher than the nations unemployment rate. How does everyone think things have gotten the way they are. And who's to blame. Alot of people point the finger at Mark Sanford, but from my understanding I've heard we've always had a losy job force. Another issue is how our high unemployment rates have most college graduates eyeing the job force in neighboring states. I know more than 10 people alone that has move to Atl in the last 2 months. What can we do as a state to play catch up.

Mostly because of a semi-literate poorly educated work force, a historically intrenched oligarchical ruling class, a large welfare population, and a lack of natural resources. Sanford is really a Libertarian, there is no magic wand he or the "government" can wave to create jobs. (Hint: governments don't 'produce' anything.) The establishment (and success) of the Greenville Tech system, which provides a pool of skilled potential employees, has been a major factor in attracting industrialized growth to the Greenville-Spartanburg area in recent decades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Spartan hits the nail on the head pretty good. Our lazy, reactionary legislature only responds to a crisis. Now that we are leading the nation not only in premature death causes but also lagging in employment, they will finally see that everything isn't ok.

The efforts to support Innovista, ICAR, etc. are a great start but should have happened earlier than they did. Also, what about the rest of the state, particularly the Pee Dee, Lower Savannah River region, etc. what's on the horizon for them? Nothing at the moment. The fact that EVERY county has higher unemployment that the nation as a whole is a telling sign that SC has not prepared for the future.

The actions and decisions of governement have EVERYTHING to do with job creation. Does anyone really think that if NC hadn't passed laws allowing the banking industry to grow there, or to establish the Research Triangle Park (RTP), that they would still have the economy they have now?

This topic also brings me to another point I have been wanting to make. Duke Power is consolidating with Cynergy. I saw on ETV that Duke foresees a nationwide consolidation in the power industry, much as banking did in the last decade. Will SCANA be abosrbed by any outside company, thus meaning hundreds (thousands?) of good paying jobs would leave the Columbia and Charleston areas? Will NC companies like Duke again lead the way, and be the "winners" in this high stakes transition? Will Charlotte be the beneficiary at the expense of Columbia and Charleston?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Spartan hits the nail on the head pretty good. Our lazy, reactionary legislature only responds to a crisis. Now that we are leading the nation not only in premature death causes but also lagging in employment, they will finally see that everything isn't ok.

The efforts to support Innovista, ICAR, etc. are a great start but should have happened earlier than they did. Also, what about the rest of the state, particularly the Pee Dee, Lower Savannah River region, etc. what's on the horizon for them? Nothing at the moment. The fact that EVERY county has higher unemployment that the nation as a whole is a telling sign that SC has not prepared for the future.

The actions and decisions of governement have EVERYTHING to do with job creation. Does anyone really think that if NC hadn't passed laws allowing the banking industry to grow there, or to establish the Research Triangle Park (RTP), that they would still have the economy they have now?

This topic also brings me to another point I have been wanting to make. Duke Power is consolidating with Cynergy. I saw on ETV that Duke foresees a nationwide consolidation in the power industry, much as banking did in the last decade. Will SCANA be abosrbed by any outside company, thus meaning hundreds (thousands?) of good paying jobs would leave the Columbia and Charleston areas? Will NC companies like Duke again lead the way, and be the "winners" in this high stakes transition? Will Charlotte be the beneficiary at the expense of Columbia and Charleston?

What laws did NC pass to promote the banking industry? Charlotte became a banking powerhouse because Hugh McColl, the CEO of NCNB, went on the greatest acquisition spree in the history of banking, culminating in the merger with Bank of America, and he intentionally planned to make Charlotte his headquarters and a major US banking center. He is from Cheraw, SC, I believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mostly because of a semi-literate poorly educated work force......

Look at the title of this thread:

Why does SC has the highest unemployment rate

Maybe I'm being nitpicky, and I know we all make typos. I do hope the creator of this thread made an honest mistake, and didn't learn this in our public schools. Which, by the way, is another reason why our state lags in job creation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know why, but I think SC has always been one of those states to have a high unemployment rate even before Sanford

I agree and i dont think its Sanford's fault the unemployment is high since it was high well before he was elected into office. The Pee Dee region is where it is suffering the most, especially Marlboro County at about 10%.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, Sanford is definitely NOT Libertarian (I wish he were!). Regardless, I don't blame him for SC's problems. Our state is historically behind in terms of unemployment, education, and the economy. Most of that is hurt by the area of the state below Columbia (except for Charleston and much of the coast, of course). That area is rural, poor, and uneducated for the most part. That area hurts our state in many ways. If you disregard the lowcountry, I don't think our test scores, median income, etc. would look bad at all.

Overall, SC is difficult to manage and even harder to improve. I have not been very impressed with Sanford, but he has done some good things as well. I certainly don't blame him for our state's situation. You know what they say: you can't make good wine out of bad grapes.

So how do we grow better grapes? And how do we maximize their value?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What really boggles me is why SC hasn't done a better job of preparing for major shifts in the global economy that I'm more than certain was predicted long before the decline of the textile industry and the outsourcing of manufacturing jobs. I think as far as the South is concerned, NC, VA, and FL have done better jobs in this regard. Atlanta is really the only reason why GA scores so high as far as economics are concerned.

Here are some excerpts that are relevent here from a report that was completed in 2002 entitled, The SC Challenge: Regional Economic Analysis (PDF file):

Economic Foundations

The following points summarize the assessment of South Carolina

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, Sanford is definitely NOT Libertarian (I wish he were!).

Sanford is not Republican either. At least, not the by the standards set by our Congress. He does have many Libertarian tendancies though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look at the title of this thread:

Maybe I'm being nitpicky, and I know we all make typos. I do hope the creator of this thread made an honest mistake, and didn't learn this in our public schools. Which, by the way, is another reason why our state lags in job creation.

Just nitpicky!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Krazeboi in that SC has not anticipated the global changes in the economy until they are well behind the curve. I chalk it up to laziness and cluelessness on the part of our omnipotent legislature.

The property tax issue is but one example of such behavior. Everyone aknowledges that there are problems, but the legislature insists on quick-fix, simple solutions rather than an all-inclusive tax structure overhaul that responsible groups like the Palmetto Institute are calling for.

No doubt, the legislature will pass some reactionary, short-sighted legislation that will lead to numerous unintended consequences. Local officials will be hamstrung to run their localities, and a great shift of power and control to the legislature will occur. The property tax situation will only be abated temporarily, much like the 'reforms' of the early '90's under then Governor Beasley.

BTW, just to clarify some things, Hugh McColl is from Bennettsville not Cheraw (close though). Speaking of that area, Marlboro WISHES it's unemployment was 10%, it's more like 13%. While unemployment is most acute in the Pee Dee, all of SC is faring worse in relation to the US compared to previous periods. Remember, we have the highest unemployement after LA and Mississippi. And we didn't have a HURRICANE!

The NC laws I referred to allowed (encourged perhaps), the merging of banks within and across it's borders which helped NCNB become a powerhouse, well positioned to benefit from the later consolidation within the banking industry. That is not to ignore the role that McColl and others played in bring that about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BTW, just to clarify some things, Hugh McColl is from Bennettsville not Cheraw (close though). Speaking of that area, Marlboro WISHES it's unemployment was 10%, it's more like 13%. While unemployment is most acute in the Pee Dee, all of SC is faring worse in relation to the US compared to previous periods...

What about the coastal counties? It was my understanding that Chas, MB, and Hilton Head had unemployment rates actually lower than the US. I could be wrong, just need clarification.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speaking of that area, Marlboro WISHES it's unemployment was 10%, it's more like 13%. While unemployment is most acute in the Pee Dee, all of SC is faring worse in relation to the US compared to previous periods. Remember, we have the highest unemployement after LA and Mississippi. And we didn't have a HURRICANE!

Since the unemployment is so bad over there, i wonder if its common that people commute into Richmond and Scotland Counties, NC for jobs in Rockingham, Hamlet, Laurinburg and Maxton? I remember a few years back, you'd see occasional SC plates up in southern Moore County around the manufacturing and industrial areas of Aberdeen but is that just a coincidence south carolinians are visiting my ex-hometown or is it because the jobs are so hard to find in Marlboro County? So far, ive went on a google search and found nothing to answer myself this question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another part of the problem for the Pee Dee is that most of that area's economy is rooted in agriculture. Agriculture is still there, but its much more mechanized with fewer and fewer small farms, so there are less employees needed. Loosing your primary employment source leads to unemloyment and emigragtion, which is what you are seeing in the Pee Dee. Its very much the same situation in the Plains, particularly in the western half of Texas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What about the coastal counties? It was my understanding that Chas, MB, and Hilton Head had unemployment rates actually lower than the US. I could be wrong, just need clarification.

Charleston's jobless is at 5.3(and dropping) and the national average is 5.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember the city of Georgetown has a VERY high unemployment rate. Especially after the steel plant closed.

I know that Horry County's illiteracy rate is between 20%-25%. Wouldn't this have a tie to unemployment?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that Horry County's illiteracy rate is between 20%-25%. Wouldn't this have a tie to unemployment?

I could see that being one of the primary reasons. I am optimistic that SC Public Schools will get better as time progresses because it is constantly being addressed as a major issue for many people. The education lottery is a start but more needs to be done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It mayt tie in some with unemployment, but there are a lot of low wage and low skill jobs that do not require literacy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.