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DanRNC

615 Boylan

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It looks like Glenwood South is getting more housing at Boylan and Peace Streets.

Story

Cool project, and interesting they would start in the spring and finish up later that year. That's fast in my opinion.

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Pretty cool sounding "infill" as with 8 stories, one of which will be a shop, and 14 condos, there will only be 2 thirteen hundred squarefoot condos per floor. At 2600 square feet total per floor this will be a tallish skinny looking building, unlike the sprawling mess that I think Paramount is. Also interesting note, glenwood south is clearly becoming the residential epicenter of downtown with three existing condo buildings (610 Hillsborough, Paramount and 510 Glenwood) and five planned (222 Glenwood, Raleigh Office Supply, Glen on Peace, St Marys condos, and Boylan Flats). One could also argue 1001 Hillsborough and Quorum revolve around Glenwood south primarily. I wonder if Fayetteville St would have evolved like Glenwood naturally if it had never been turned into a mall. Fayetteville, like city market, has now benefited from municipal assistance while Glenwood had essentially none except the streetscape improvements well after development had begun on its own.

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300-400K? Seems like the prices keep rising and makes me wonder if other projects like the Raleigh Office Supply can keep their promise of delivering more affordable units. If not then its a pity that those that made this area so hip are now having to move to more affordable areas....C'est la vie.

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300-400K? Seems like the prices keep rising and makes me wonder if other projects like the Raleigh Office Supply can keep their promise of delivering more affordable units. If not then its a pity that those that made this area so hip are now having to move to more affordable areas....C'est la vie.

oh yeah, that price really had me steamed...that little lot could not have cost over 300k or so...the rent on the ground floor business could pay off that so the condos only have to pay for their own brick and mortar.

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I don't know if Fayetville Street would ever have turned out Glenwood south-like if it was never "mall"ed,

but it already has three existing residental buildings -- the Sir Walter, the Hudson, and a few condos hidden above the Capitol Room. The Sheraton is there too, and the Prarie Building is one block over on Wilminton, yet Fayetville St. has little to no foot traffic outside 9-5. Residents alone does not a street make!

What helps Glenwood South is that it's full of what we're told people don't want to live near -- bars and restaurants that stay open late. Conventional wisdom says they "attract the wrong crowd" but now the rest of downtown wants to be the next destination district. I know the city, county, etc. would love to have Glenwood South 2 - Electric Boogaloo right outside it's shiny new convention center, but can Raleigh support two glenwoods plus the warehouse/depot district, city market, etc. or will there be some cannibalization?

I think it would be cool to live in a midrise building with a helios type coffee shop/bar in the ground floor in it's current location, in place of the garage next door, or that electrics/electronics store two doors down, but that may be wishful thinking for now.

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Actually, as a result of timing, Glenwood South was a recipient of the market's momentum whereas Fayetteville Street was relegated to wait for its vision via the Livable Streets planning process. It is true that Glenwood grew more organically, but dramatically lower lease rates (at the time) really enabled that growth. Had the Fayetteville St. project been completed five years ago, much of that growth would have occured in the CBD. BTW- the small streetscape improvements you casually understated cost the City $2M. That's not chump change...and its effect was more cosmetic than anything occuring on Fayetteville St.

The Boylan Flats building does have some very interesting attributes not mentioned in Hagel's article. First, it will be the only LEED-certified green residential project in Downtown (the second overall with the Convention Center as the eventual third). Plus, it has a glass exterior - which will really help to differentiate it from its competition.

I'd post a pic of the proposed rendering here if I could figure out how to do it.

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Another "x-factor" in the success of Glenwood South might be the name recognition that "Glenwood Avenue" holds. It's certainly better known than Fayetteville Street. No matter how new you are to the area and no matter how terrible you are at spatial relationships and directons and maps, if you live in Raleigh, you've been to Crabtree Valley Mall, and you know that it's on Glenwood Avenue.

When I first moved to Raleigh, I was a student at NCSU and neither I nor my friends thought there was any reason to go downtown. I had no clue that Glenwood Avenue so much as existed inside the beltline (yeah, I was living under a rock.) But when somebody told me about this "Glenwood South" area, something immediately clicked and I thought, "Glenwood Avenue, I know that place!"

It would be a bit ironic if this part of downtown really benefitted from association with a shopping mall. I might be wrong, but I do think this has something to do with it.

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Another problem with Fayetville Street is all the property owners assigning too high a value to their property, wanting high dollar rents based on the *potential* of the area, without there being any "there" there yet.

The early days of Glenwood South were anchored by the Milk and More Cafe (now Armadillo Grill) that supported the Pine State workers, Sunflowers (at the corner of North and Glenwood, now part of Hibernian) and the Rockford (started by an owner of the late, great Five O both bars getting names from tv cop shows), tucked in above an at the time barber shop that now houses a high end salon. These were later followed by 518, Hibernian, the redevlopment of the Pine State buildings into the Creamery and office space. These plus the push to get bars off of Hillsborugh St. led to Glenwood's quick extreme makeover into the place it is now.

It will be interesting to see what goes in where the Warren Distributing building is now, as that is the largest single parcel in the area.

Will a similar transformation take place on Fayetville Street? Time will only tell. There are occasional rumblings, but no movement yet, as businesses don't want a grand opening during the current war zone of construction.

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It will be interesting to see what goes in where the Warren Distributing building is now, as that is the largest single parcel in the area.
You probably know this, but that will be the site of 222 Glenwood, which has already been approved.

As far as what will go in on the ground floor of 222? I have no idea, but it certainly will be interesting to see.

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They need to go back to the drawing board with that one. It looks like a dorm circa 1965. Hopefully the planning commission will hold this one up.

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I agree. It looks like 40 year old lower income housing. It may be green designed, but it makes me green to look at it.

:sick:

The entry looks like my old college dormatory.

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I think if they changed the bottom floors and lost those red "X" things it would be a little better. Overall I just don't understand the concept.

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But then again, this would probably be somehow "cool" if it were a 40 year old Ho-jo, converted to condos or apartments.

Count me in the minority, but something just appeals to me about it. It looks very open. It certainly doesn't look like a luxury condo building a-la Paramount or Dawson, but then again, not every urban residential building should try to look like each unit cost a million dollars.

In my opinion, its utilitarian and blue-collar appearance is part of the appeal.

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