Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Bartholomew

Gross State Product 2004

Recommended Posts

States ranked by Economic Output per person:

States ranked by Gross State Product per capita 2004:

Rank State GSP per Capita

1 Delaware 65,634

2 Connecticut 53,402

3 Alaska 51,721

4 Massachusetts 49,513

5 Wyoming 47,974

6 New Jersey 47,811

7 New York 46,793

8 Minnesota 44,227

9 Virginia 43,781

10 Colorado 43,465

11 California 43,010

12 Nevada 42,574

13 Washington 41,878

14 Illinois 41,601

15 Maryland 40,752

16 New Hampshire 40,092

17 Hawaii 39,672

18 North Carolina 39,268

19 Texas 39,168

20 Nebraska 38,862

21 Rhode Island 38,774

22 Iowa 38,687

23 Georgia 38,587

24 Wisconsin 38,428

25 South Dakota 38,138

26 Pennsylvania 37,787

27 North Dakota 37,202

28 Michigan 36,865

29 Tennessee 36,757

30 Ohio 36,504

31 Indiana 36,440

32 Kansas 36,227

33 Oregon 35,637

34 Vermont 35,565

35 Missouri 35,311

36 Arizona 34,768

37 Utah 34,491

38 Florida 34,172

39 Louisiana 33,660

40 Maine 32,871

41 Kentucky 32,659

42 South Carolina 32,229

43 New Mexico 31,997

44 Idaho 31,150

45 Alabama 30,573

46 Oklahoma 30,424

47 Montana 29,886

48 Arkansas 29,099

49 West Virginia 27,433

50 Mississippi 26,249

States ranked by Gross State Product (in billions) 2004:

Rank State Gross State Product

1 California 1543.8

2 New York 899.7

3 Texas 880.9

4 Florida 594.5

5 Illinois 528.9

6 Pennsylvania 468.8

7 Ohio 418.3

8 New Jersey 415.9

9 Michigan 372.8

10 Georgia 340.7

11 North Carolina 335.4

12 Virginia 326.6

13 Massachusetts 317.7

14 Washington 259.8

15 Indiana 227.3

16 Maryland 226.5

17 Minnesota 225.6

18 Tennessee 216.9

19 Wisconsin 211.7

20 Missouri 203.2

21 Colorado 200.0

22 Arizona 199.7

23 Connecticut 187.1

24 Louisiana 152.0

25 Alabama 138.5

26 Kentucky 135.4

27 South Carolina 135.3

28 Oregon 128.1

29 Iowa 114.3

30 Oklahoma 107.2

31 Nevada 99.4

32 Kansas 99.1

33 Utah 82.4

34 Arkansas 80.1

35 Mississippi 76.2

36 Nebraska 67.9

37 New Mexico 60.9

38 Delaware 54.5

39 New Hampshire 52.1

40 Hawaii 50.1

41 West Virginia 49.8

42 Idaho 43.4

43 Maine 43.3

44 Rhode Island 41.9

45 Alaska 33.9

46 South Dakota 29.4

47 Montana 27.7

48 Wyoming 24.3

49 North Dakota 23.6

50 Vermont 22.1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


The south has some decent ones, it also holds some spots at the very bottom. Sometimes it seems like the forumers think the south consists of three states, Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia. Did you all disown Mississippi Alabama, and Arkansas? Not to mention SC, LA, and FL?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where did you get that impression? Who only associate southern prosperity with three states? Now sometimes a few forumers from the south don't like to associate their state with the "South" and want to dis-associate it from southern stereotypes, but I have never heard Georgia, NC, and Virginia touted as the only southern states worthy enough for association with the South with the others wrote off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes it seems like the forumers think the south consists of three states, Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia. Did you all disown Mississippi Alabama, and Arkansas? Not to mention SC, LA, and FL?

The main reason your here more about NC, GA, and VA, is probably because there are so many forumers from those states, compared to only a handful from MS, LA, and AL.

There is plenty of talk about Tennessee, South Carolina, and Florida, and there is alot of new talk coming from Arkansas as well.

Like Rural King said, states identify themselves from a different part of the south and/or southern culture, i.e. the new south and the deep south, or what states or parts of states are more southern than others. But I have never seen any indication of anyone disowning TN, SC, AR, LA, MS, AL, or FL. I dont know where you got that impression.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh... Minnesota is #8. Not bad, considering how everyone tends to forget us. All the states surrounding Minnesota finished in the top 30 (for per capita).

I was actually surprised that Wisconsin and Michigan fared so poorly. But I guess they're much more industrial and have less of a high tech base. Minnesota tends to rank high in medical and high tech stuff, which are pretty high earners. And while Wisconsin is America's dairyland, Minnesota produces just as much as them (less cheese, more milk).

Oh, and about the "forgetting about Minnesota"...

whenever you tape something with scotch tape.. Minnesota

whenever you write a note on a Post-it Note... Minnesota

If you happen to take a Greyhound Bus... Minnesota

When it's nearing 0*F with a wind whipping out of hte north and you have a good foot of snow on the ground... subtract 30 degrees and think... Minnesota :):):)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The south has some decent ones, it also holds some spots at the very bottom. Sometimes it seems like the forumers think the south consists of three states, Georgia, North Carolina, and Virginia. Did you all disown Mississippi Alabama, and Arkansas? Not to mention SC, LA, and FL?

I can somewhat see where you would get that impression, at least as far at this thread is concerned; six Southern states fall in the bottom 10 in the GSP per capita category, whereas only one is included in the top 10. However, I assure you, there is no "disowning" going on.

I wasn't surprised to see my state rank in the bottom 10 in the GSP per capita category; God knows we've got some work to do. But it's good to see us in the middle in the gross state product category. We're blessed in the natural resources department.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gross Product, is how much a given area produces, measured in dollars, if you take that number and divide it by how many people live in the given area, you obviously get GP per capita. Urban areas tend to produce more than rural areas, which is why so much wealth tends to be concentrated in those areas. While GDP is a good tool, I disagree that it's a good way to measure a States Wealth. For instance, Virginia, Ranked in the top ten, Take out the DC Burbs, and I would wager you'd get a more mixed result. I know that there is still the Hampton Roads area, but I don't know where that falls in terms of suburban wealth. Where would GA be w/o Atlanta, or MI without Detroits super wealthy burbs. Would someone do a list of rankings by per capita income? I think if you're trying to compare wealth, that's a better picture.

I take it back I found the thread. And it is more of a mixed result.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh... Minnesota is #8. Not bad, considering how everyone tends to forget us. All the states surrounding Minnesota finished in the top 30 (for per capita).

I was actually surprised that Wisconsin and Michigan fared so poorly. But I guess they're much more industrial and have less of a high tech base. Minnesota tends to rank high in medical and high tech stuff, which are pretty high earners. And while Wisconsin is America's dairyland, Minnesota produces just as much as them (less cheese, more milk).

Oh, and about the "forgetting about Minnesota"...

whenever you tape something with scotch tape.. Minnesota

whenever you write a note on a Post-it Note... Minnesota

If you happen to take a Greyhound Bus... Minnesota

When it's nearing 0*F with a wind whipping out of hte north and you have a good foot of snow on the ground... subtract 30 degrees and think... Minnesota :):):)

We all know about 3M Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing, but I thought that Greyhound was part of the Dial Company and was based in Arizona now. It might have been started in Minnesota, I don't really know. You could have brought up Cargill, General Mills, Land O Lakes, and Northwest Airlines. Just to name a few.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting list. Though I think it is somewhat skewed. In particular, I know many companies set up headquarters in Delaware to take advantage of the tax laws there. These companies don't do much business in Delaware but report their earnings there, which shows up in these statistics. I think read that over half of the Fortune 500 is headquartered in Delaware. I believe this sort of thing is also common in Nevada.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.