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Governors School for the Arts & Humanities

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Great pics! They have a great location and a beautiful campus. Does anyone know what was here before? (if anything)

Great shots gsupstate! :thumbsup:

If you ever have a chance to go to a performance there, it is well worth it. I went to the piano competition early this year and it was absolutely fabulous! The great thing is, its free!

GvilleSC, Furman University was here before it moved to its present location. Furman also covered University Ridge, hence the name. :D

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I believe Furman was a women's college in those days?

I'm not sure about that, but there was the Greenville Women's College located at the present Heritage Green. Again, thus the name "College St."

I believe there was also a Women's College called Chicora? Located at the present day Riverplace, or possibly across Camperdown from Riverplace.

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I'm not sure about that, but there was the Greenville Women's College located at the present Heritage Green. Again, thus the name "College St."

I believe there was also a Women's College called Chicora? Located at the present day Riverplace, or possibly across Camperdown from Riverplace.

Furman was located here before they moved to their present location in the late 50's, early 60's. It was a men's college at the time. Greenville Women's College was located at Heritage Green.

In 1933, women from GWC started attending classes on the downtown Furman campus, and shortly thereafter the schools merged. However, they maintained separate campuses until the move to the new location on Poinsett Highway.

Chicora College was a competing women's college sponsored by the Presbyterians (Furman was Baptist.) It was located near Furman on a site across the river from the Peace Center, near the present construction. Chicora College moved from Greenville to Columbia in 1915 and its buildings burned in 1919.

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Holmes Bible School? What/where is that?

Holmes Bible College was originally located on top of Paris Mountain in the old Altamont Hotel in the early part of the 20th century. Founded by Nicholas J. Holmes, it was/is a very conservative college loosely affiliated with various Pentecostal movements. My grandfather and grandmother taught there when the college was at Altamonte.

Sometime around the middle of the last century, Holmes moved to its present location just off of Old Buncombe Road, near the end of Hampton Street. Construction on the Western Connector bisected the neighborhood surrounding Holmes, so it is moving to a parcel on Old Buncombe near Furman.

Here is a link to more info...

http://www.holmes.edu/

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If you ever have a chance to go to a performance there, it is well worth it. I went to the piano competition early this year and it was absolutely fabulous! The great thing is, its free!

Thanks for the tip! How do you find out about events at the Governors School? I haven't seen them posted on Greater Greenville.

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^ Thanks!

Just curious, how did the states Arts and Humanities school end up in Greenville and not Columbia? Seems like this would be something that would be in the state capital city.

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^ Thanks!

Just curious, how did the states Arts and Humanities school end up in Greenville and not Columbia? Seems like this would be something that would be in the state capital city.

I think it was partly the result of donated land, and perhaps money as well. It probably didn't hurt that Speaker of the House David Wilkins was from Greenville. The other's Governor's school is in Hartsville, so neither one is exactly centrally located. I think Hartsville got it because Coker College has some available classroom space, which was contributed.

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I think it was partly the result of donated land, and perhaps money as well. It probably didn't hurt that Speaker of the House David Wilkins was from Greenville. The other's Governor's school is in Hartsville, so neither one is exactly centrally located. I think Hartsville got it because Coker College has some available classroom space, which was contributed.

I believe that Carroll Campbell had something to do with this. I read about it in one of the stories online from WYFF about his legacy. Apparently Virginia Uldrick who was the director/(founder????) and his school teacher- who had an important impact on his life. It went something like that I believe.

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Great article on the front page of the News this morning.

From the article:

"The Greenville-based statewide residential high school had the highest proportion of students scoring 3 or better on the AP music theory exam of any school in the world with fewer than 300 students."

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Great article! One of the things I've noticed very often is the impact students at the Governors School have made on downtown. Besides seeing them walking up and down the streets and in the parks, their art and music is being woven into the urban fabric of life here. :D

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Great article! One of the things I've noticed very often is the impact students at the Governors School have made on downtown. Besides seeing them walking up and down the streets and in the parks, their art and music is being woven into the urban fabric of life here. :D

Yes, I ate at the Overlook Grill one night last summer and they had a keyboard player from the Governors School playing outside. Quite nice.

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^ Thanks!

Just curious, how did the states Arts and Humanities school end up in Greenville and not Columbia? Seems like this would be something that would be in the state capital city.

I think another major reason for the Governors School for the Arts and Humanities locating here was Greenville's location in relation to a very artistic region nationally. Besides Greenville being a well known city of the Arts, you have the mecca of Asheville just 45 minutes away, and the entire region around both cities is loaded with countless craftsmen and artists.

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Great article on the front page of the News this morning.

From the article:

"The Greenville-based statewide residential high school had the highest proportion of students scoring 3 or better on the AP music theory exam of any school in the world with fewer than 300 students."

Thanks NYT! Excellent article! :thumbsup: I agree with you guys about the diversity that the school adds to downtown. It helps an already thriving arts scene. I really like around the holidays the way some of the music students play on street corners. Adds so much atmosphere! :thumbsup:

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I totally agree about the Governor's School. It is an excellent school, and definitely an asset for Greenville. They picked the perfect city and the perfect location for such a school, given Greenville's strong arts scene.

I think it would be cool to spend a summer or a school year living at the Governor's School, right in the middle of things downtown. That has to be a very fun and enriching experience for young high school students who have perhaps never lived away from home.

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