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Mith242

Architecture in Northwest Arkansas

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Okay I finally remembered to start this topic again. I did something like this in the general Arkansas forum a while back with little luck. Maybe I still won't have much luck with this but Matt is around and might have some input. Is there type of architecture that anyone would like to see in northwest Arkansas? I do know Matt seems to like that 'urban' look so maybe he likes the nice modern glass clad type of buildings. While I do like a number of different types and styles including the rather modern look I personally would like to see something else. Maybe it's partially because of the setting up here but I guess I like to see buildings using a lot of stone. And there's some native stone that can be used also. Although I wouldn't mind having some more modern designs using stone also. I've always liked Gaudi quite a bit. Although his 'organic' type style might seen a bit out of place I wouldn't mind having something a little unconventional also. I've never been a huge fan of the classical style architecture with the Greeco-Roman columns. It's alright but I guess I'd like something a bit different than that style personally. Anyway let's see if I can get anyone else to respond and I may go into more detail.

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I like to see a diverse group of buildings.

The Modern and Post Modern are my favorite. I love to see all the new design and futuristic looking buildings because there's always something interesting to look at.

I do enjoy the The Art Deco and Art Moderne use setbacks to reduce building mass and to emphasize verticality.

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I like to see a diverse group of buildings.

The Modern and Post Modern are my favorite. I love to see all the new design and futuristic looking buildings because there's always something interesting to look at.

I do enjoy the The Art Deco and Art Moderne use setbacks to reduce building mass and to emphasize verticality.

Do you have any particular architects you like? There is architecture I like but not sure if I would consider for northwest Arkansas. many of the developments in Dubai for example are very interesting but I'm not sure if many of those would work well in northwest Arkansas in my opinion.

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Do you have any particular architects you like? There is architecture I like but not sure if I would consider for northwest Arkansas. many of the developments in Dubai for example are very interesting but I'm not sure if many of those would work well in northwest Arkansas in my opinion.

I could just see a 70 story futuristic building along the Interstate. :rofl: . There's really not a particular architect that I prefer, I just try to look at the building.

What kind of architecture do you think is best suited for NWA.

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I could just see a 70 story futuristic building along the Interstate. :rofl: . There's really not a particular architect that I prefer, I just try to look at the building.

What kind of architecture do you think is best suited for NWA.

Like I said earlier I think the stone look does well for northwest Arkansas. Of course maybe I should break this down more. I guess I could see some more modern sleek glass cladded buildings in say areas of Rogers. But I think that may be a bit out of place in Fayetteville generally. Granted the Fayetteville Public Library probably wouldn't fit the mold I'm setting and I think it's very nice. I wouldn't mind trying to have some stuff that's not very traditional but I guess I'm just trying to think of what could be tried out and would have a chance of fitting in. I always liked the mosaic tile used in buildings in the Middle East. What if you used something like that but put it on a building shaped more like what you'd find over here. Not just try to copy it and make it look like a mosque or anything from the Middle East. I like Gaudi quite a bit, I wouldn't mind trying to have something a bit similar to some of his designs. I wouldn't want everything to look like it was very traditional and such. But I also don't think we have to try to build something very postmodern and sleek to try to say that we're trying to be 'urban' like other cities. Maybe I can find some pics to help illustrate what I'm talking about.

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Here's some examples of his work. I have some books of his architecture. I wish I could find pics of some of the interiors I've seen. But I guess this will give you a small taste of some of his more well know buildings.

gaudi.jpg

gaudi-casa-batllo-06_jpg.jpg

gaudi-casa-batllo-07_jpg.jpg

gaudi-la-pedrera-00_jpg.jpg

gaudi-la-pedrera-03_jpg.jpg

sagrada-familia-04-0_jpg.jpg

gaudi.jpg

13_4_manzana_de_la_discordia_momo_ofek.jpg

18_4_parc-guell.jpg

Ba_Parc_Guell_3_c.jpg

parc_guell.jpg

BARCELONA_Parc_Guell_commissioned_by_Gaudi_1_photosource_LS_digital.JPG

Okay got a little carried away there. I really wish I could find more and better pics. Also including the interiors which are also rather interesting.

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Wow, definately Interesting.

I think a few of those buildings would fit right into Fayetteville. It looks like a flair of some middle east architecture, with some more modern and conservative buildings. Very interesting.

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Wow, definately Interesting.

I think a few of those buildings would fit right into Fayetteville. It looks like a flair of some middle east architecture, with some more modern and conservative buildings. Very interesting.

I think the tile work is probably influenced from the Moors. Oh maybe I should mention gaudi was Spanish and most of his work is in Barcelona. Like I said I wouldn't mind seeing something like the tile work in some of Gaudi's work or even more in what you'd see in some architecture in the Middle East. Perhaps use it to clad more familiar shaped buildings in our culture with it. I don't think there's a need to just simply copy it straight from other buildings and such. Take some elements from other areas and apply it to local building types and styles.

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I think the tile work is probably influenced from the Moors. Oh maybe I should mention gaudi was Spanish and most of his work is in Barcelona. Like I said I wouldn't mind seeing something like the tile work in some of Gaudi's work or even more in what you'd see in some architecture in the Middle East. Perhaps use it to clad more familiar shaped buildings in our culture with it. I don't think there's a need to just simply copy it straight from other buildings and such. Take some elements from other areas and apply it to local building types and styles.

Well I guess the Moors are related to the Middle East and Islam. Some Tile Work buildings would be welcomed up here, but I think I would only likely see it in a city like Fayetteville.

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Well I guess the Moors are related to the Middle East and Islam. Some Tile Work buildings would be welcomed up here, but I think I would only likely see it in a city like Fayetteville.

Sorry I keep going off an tangents and forget what I was trying to imply. The Moors were from northwern Africa where today's Morocco is basically. Yes they were converted to Islam and for a while much of Spain was actually Muslim. Eventually the Christian area of the country was able to push out the Muslim Moorish part. But aspect of the Moors still make up a part of the Spanish culture even today. I don't know if you've ever noticed but the reason that Hispanics and the Spanish use both parents last name was because people used to try to show that their ancestry was 'pure' of any Moorish ancestry.

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Sorry I keep going off an tangents and forget what I was trying to imply. The Moors were from northwern Africa where today's Morocco is basically. Yes they were converted to Islam and for a while much of Spain was actually Muslim. Eventually the Christian area of the country was able to push out the Muslim Moorish part. But aspect of the Moors still make up a part of the Spanish culture even today. I don't know if you've ever noticed but the reason that Hispanics and the Spanish use both parents last name was because people used to try to show that their ancestry was 'pure' of any Moorish ancestry.

I didn't know that. Thanks Mith.

I know that there was a lot of more Moorish ( I think I said that right) architecture in a lot of southern Spain.

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I didn't know that. Thanks Mith.

I know that there was a lot of more Moorish ( I think I said that right) architecture in a lot of southern Spain.

Yep, to be honest a lot of my current interest in learning more about Muslims and that area of the world started off with this. Appreciating Gaudi's architecture and knowing some of it was influenced by Moorish architecture left in Spain before they were forced out. So I started looking more into Moorish architecture and culture which led me to looking more into the rest of the Muslim world.

On another side not that you might find interesting. To celebrate the Moors being kicked out and returning the area to Christianity they funded a major voyage to someone named Christopher Columbus.

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On another side not that you might find interesting. To celebrate the Moors being kicked out and returning the area to Christianity they funded a major voyage to someone named Christopher Columbus.

I remember learning that in World History. Man that was a while ago.

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I remember learning that in World History. Man that was a while ago.

Funny how appreciating Gaudi's work has led me to so much else. Now I'm looking more into the Muslim part of the world and it's culture and architecture.

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Hey maybe I'll mention this here and breath a little life back into it instead of posting this in the Fayetteville topic. The magazine International Design named a local architect as one of 40 underappreciated people. Anyone heard of Marlon Blackwell? The name sounds a little familiar to me but I can't say I'm familiar with any of his work. Looks like I'll have to check into his work. Looks like he helped renovate a couple of buildings on East Ave and Meadow St. He designed the cluhouse at the Blessings Golf Course, I wasn't even familiar with that gold course. He apparently designed an office building in Johnson, I"m wondering if it's the one I took pictures of. If so it's not too far away from James at the Mill. Apparently his most well known building is the Keenan Towerhouse. I think this is possibly what someone was claiming was one of E Fay Jones' works. I tried taking a couple of shots of it a while back. I'll have to get back over there and take some pics with my new camera. I should be able to see it better with it.

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Hey maybe I'll mention this here and breath a little life back into it instead of posting this in the Fayetteville topic. The magazine International Design named a local architect as one of 40 underappreciated people. Anyone heard of Marlon Blackwell? The name sounds a little familiar to me but I can't say I'm familiar with any of his work. Looks like I'll have to check into his work. Looks like he helped renovate a couple of buildings on East Ave and Meadow St. He designed the cluhouse at the Blessings Golf Course, I wasn't even familiar with that gold course. He apparently designed an office building in Johnson, I"m wondering if it's the one I took pictures of. If so it's not too far away from James at the Mill. Apparently his most well known building is the Keenan Towerhouse. I think this is possibly what someone was claiming was one of E Fay Jones' works. I tried taking a couple of shots of it a while back. I'll have to get back over there and take some pics with my new camera. I should be able to see it better with it.

My favorites types of architecture for Fayetteville are:

Arts & Crafts in the style of Frank Lloyd Wright and E. Fay Jones.

Art Deco.

Neo-Gothic.

The last one is a stretch, but I'd love to see the old courthouse tricked out with some gargoyles. :D

I think for Fayetteville, the best architecture will takes its cues from the existing landscape and use natural materials and respect the grade of the hills. I'd also like to see a lot of stone and wood in construction in Fayetteville like you see used in Colorado.

I also like the old stuff on Dickson like the UArk Theater, etc that looks like it has some Art Deco influence. I think we could use more of that.

I don't think Fayetteville is suited for the types of glass-shard design architecture we have here in Dallas.

The only reason that style looks so cool here is because there is nothing else to look at, and the only views out of windows are of Texas prairieland or of other buildings.

I do like some of the more modern architure using steel and clean lines and glass in a minimalist fashion. Anything too outrageous is just going to look very dated in a decade or two.

As far as Gaudi, I get what he is going for, but it all reminds me of toadstools and the Smurfs for some reason. I prefer more elegant, angular expression of organic vibes ala E. Fay Jones.

I also enjoy neo-classical architecture and think that the view of First Methodist church coming down East Ave is stunning.

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Yeah, I have a problem with liking certain types of architecture but also realizing that some of those styles just really wouldn't fit into Fayetteville. Although I don't know if Fayetteville should severely limit itself like some people want. I'm a bit surprised the new library didn't have more controversy with it's design. I do agree that Fayetteville should be careful what it does allow but I don't think it should try to restrict everything that looks modern.

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Yeah, I have a problem with liking certain types of architecture but also realizing that some of those styles just really wouldn't fit into Fayetteville. Although I don't know if Fayetteville should severely limit itself like some people want. I'm a bit surprised the new library didn't have more controversy with it's design. I do agree that Fayetteville should be careful what it does allow but I don't think it should try to restrict everything that looks modern.

I think they should have design standards, but keep them vague.

For more substantial projects, each should be reviewed to ascertain the impact design and size will have on the overall landscape. This should be done on a case by case basis.

Larger cities do this to give their skyline a certain feel. Dallas is a great example of well planned, well spaced skyline and the planning that it requires.

I love Fayetteville for its personality. Part of maintaining that is being sensitive to the impact of development to the existing landscape. In a time of growth, cities can be selective and ensure that every project that comes along is an improvement to the city rather than a future eyesore.

I agree that its can seem stifling, but I'm glad that people care.

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I think they should have design standards, but keep them vague.

For more substantial projects, each should be reviewed to ascertain the impact design and size will have on the overall landscape. This should be done on a case by case basis.

Larger cities do this to give their skyline a certain feel. Dallas is a great example of well planned, well spaced skyline and the planning that it requires.

I love Fayetteville for its personality. Part of maintaining that is being sensitive to the impact of development to the existing landscape. In a time of growth, cities can be selective and ensure that every project that comes along is an improvement to the city rather than a future eyesore.

I agree that its can seem stifling, but I'm glad that people care.

Good points. I think I've even heard that mentioned somewhere before about having things somewhat vague and basically putting more emphasis on reviewing things case by case. And yeah it's great that people do care. I just hope that there is some allowance to have some modern aspects mixed in as well. I've heard some arguments about having everything closely modeled after the older architecture in the city. In a sense having new buildings with an appearance of having been built decades ago. While I do appreciate some of those older styles I don't necessarily think you should restrict yourself to these. I don't mind having some buildings done this way but I wouldn't want everything to be done like this.

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Good points. I think I've even heard that mentioned somewhere before about having things somewhat vague and basically putting more emphasis on reviewing things case by case. And yeah it's great that people do care. I just hope that there is some allowance to have some modern aspects mixed in as well. I've heard some arguments about having everything closely modeled after the older architecture in the city. In a sense having new buildings with an appearance of having been built decades ago. While I do appreciate some of those older styles I don't necessarily think you should restrict yourself to these. I don't mind having some buildings done this way but I wouldn't want everything to be done like this.

A lot of the desire to restrict is backlash from the bad development of the 1980s and the so called "urban renewal" of the 1970s where a lot of older buildings were either destroyed or had their facades replaced or covered over by cheaper, "more modern" materials. The rush to develop College Avenue illustrates this as well with a lot of BAD buildings, minimal landscaping and expansive, uninterrupted parking lots. I think that over time as the city redevelops some of those areas that the restrictive mentality will relax a bit.

I can't imagine the mindset as it must have prevalied in those days. To think that at one point the demolitioin of Old Main was a possibility is mind boggling to me.

I think that there are modern aspects in many of the buildings going up. The town center off the square, the Bordino's building is very modern IMO, and even Three Sisters, with all its faux history, is topped with a big glass-windowed penthouse.

I think modern aspects will be incorporated into a lot of buildings.

I'm not opposed to modern architecture per se. I hope the emphasis is on "good architecture" and by that I mean architecture that is classic in some sense and will stand the test of time, rather than flavor of the month trendy architecture.

The Legacy building looks modern to me in renderings, yet classic in a sense that I don't imagine it ever looking out of place with the rest of the street.

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A lot of the desire to restrict is backlash from the bad development of the 1980s and the so called "urban renewal" of the 1970s where a lot of older buildings were either destroyed or had their facades replaced or covered over by cheaper, "more modern" materials. The rush to develop College Avenue illustrates this as well with a lot of BAD buildings, minimal landscaping and expansive, uninterrupted parking lots. I think that over time as the city redevelops some of those areas that the restrictive mentality will relax a bit.

I can't imagine the mindset as it must have prevalied in those days. To think that at one point the demolitioin of Old Main was a possibility is mind boggling to me.

I think that there are modern aspects in many of the buildings going up. The town center off the square, the Bordino's building is very modern IMO, and even Three Sisters, with all its faux history, is topped with a big glass-windowed penthouse.

I think modern aspects will be incorporated into a lot of buildings.

I'm not opposed to modern architecture per se. I hope the emphasis is on "good architecture" and by that I mean architecture that is classic in some sense and will stand the test of time, rather than flavor of the month trendy architecture.

The Legacy building looks modern to me in renderings, yet classic in a sense that I don't imagine it ever looking out of place with the rest of the street.

True, so far things don't seen overly restrictive yet. I guess I was just a bit concerned with possible developments in the future. Although to be honest I imagine things will be different than the downtown area. I imagine that will be the main focus of trying to keep a certain theme going. Which does seem much more reasonable to me. I also agree with you on Old Main, it really is hard to think that they seriously considered demolishing it. Speaking of which I've been a bit surprised just how many older buildings are still around. Some of them are hard to tell because they have more modern facades on them. The Ozark Building just north of the Old Courthouse being one of them. They apparently tried to restore the original surface when they remodeled it in the 90's. It had been remodeled in the 50's. But they said it would have caused too much damage to try to remove the concrete and such from the original surface they gave up. I also never would have known one building near the Square was the old Woolworth building by the way it looks now. Makes me wonder what else is out there and I just don't realize it.

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