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LJinPA

Which Mid-Atlantic metros show the most promise?

Sunbelt of the Northeast:   29 members have voted

  1. 1. Which Mid-Atlantic area show the most promise?

    • Philadelphia
      6
    • Harrisburg, Lancaster, York
      3
    • Allentown-Bethlehem
      1
    • Wilmington, DE
      1
    • Baltimore
      1
    • Greater D.C.
      14
    • Reading, PA
      0
    • Stroudsburg/ The Poconos
      0
    • Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
      0
    • Greater New York
      0
    • Other
      3

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9 posts in this topic

I just threw in NYC for the heck of it, The Poconos dur to the rapid growth, and Wilkes-Barre/Scranton for comparison sake since I live there... Since Florida and Arizona are too far away from family and roots for many, and since the region (Philly, Wilmington, Lancaster, York, DC...) has the mildest winters of its Latitude with exception of the west coast... I thought I'd bring attention to the region. Ususlly on economic rankings lists the cities of the NE that rank the highest seem to be Wilmington, Harrisburg, or DC. Also in numeric growth this area one of the fastest growing outside the real sunbelt.

I wouldn't think too much with the poll remembering that it is subjective... But it would be nice to compare the pros and cons of each metro mentioned. (Giving the scoop in "tell it like it is" East Coast style) ;)

Mainly I'm concerned with job growth potential and job availability... but cost of living, rents, crime, popularity among young singles, and what KIND of jobs are most abundant, are important also...

I'll try to give what I know:

NYC- too $$$, everyone already knows the good points ;)

Philly, not sure what the job market is like...the crime rate seems no worse than any city it's size, I'd imagine it's not cheap. Average High/Low in January 40/24 F, Average snowfall, 20"- Comparable to the Ohio Valley or Missouri minus the tornados.

Harrisburg/Lancaster/York- Seems like a non-threatening choice. It's building a Tech school DT. Always rates well in economy, crime and cost of living stats. Close to the big citie, moderately fast growing. Seems to have a moderately open, friendly and accepting feel despite being in a region of very "red" counties. Definately less "east coast attitude"there than in points North and East... It could use some more educational oppertunities however and the traffic can be rather disorganized. Many people down there seem to be content and remind me that there is more there than state jobs.

Wilmington- Does great on all the statistics, has a nice skyline and is growing fast. Has a reputation for crime despite doing OK statistically. I havent spent much time there. It does seem that many people still make faces when I mention or ask about the place. I guess it sits in Philly's shadow.

***DC does great as any sunbelt metro in statistics, is surprisingly clean, and I have a friend there who loves it. It is $$$ unless you have the right job and degree. One thing though I did find it to have a sterile-ness about it in a lot of ways.

***Baltimore I haven't spent much time in, from what I know it doesn't do well as far as economy, growth, or crime statistics. The reputation for crime is still bad. Otherwise there is a lot about Baltimore that I like. My one friend has a terrible time finding work there... OK OK he was an Anthropology/Art History major but I was Social Sciences/Social Services so I'd be in a similar boat. Liberal arts majors are people too ;)

***The Poconos are growing fast, but mainly w/ people commuting to other places. Most of that growth seems to be suburban families and retirees. E Stroudsburg is also a growing college town. The winters are NOT fun however.

***The Lehigh Valley is growing fast, they seem to have several industries and Bethlehem has a very charming DT. I was just there last weekend. Lots of the growth however is suburban, it's not ugly sprawl, but I fear it's developing more of a bedroom community identity.

***Scranton/W-B: I'm more interested in hearing OTHER people's take on my home. It makes it easier to comapre. The population continues to decline- esp in the Valley. I also feel the terrain helps to isolate us, look at PA on a detailed physical map, most of the action is south of blue mtn. We have a strong Hometown feel, New England charm and Heritage, St Patrick's Day, Italian and Polish food, very loyal close-knit neighborhoods, low violent crime, cheap housing, very clean and well laid out by New Englanders. The job market is just DEPRESSING! The wages are among the lowest in the nation. You need to know someone and learn the secret handshakes to get a decent job (Yes I know cliques are everywhere, but there seems to be something exceptionally clannish and standoffish about the Northern end of the coal region- maybe Yankee stoicism? It's intangeable but definately there!). Young people are still leaving. Old families still seem to have influence. Some people love it here but that content is based more on "SORRY the grass is NOT greener on the other side-welcome to life" than enthusiam toward NE-PA. I think the isolating (though attractive) terrain along with that pessimism, fear of change and cynicism I described here and on other threads are the biggest enemies here. It's nice to raise a family and great to be "FROM"...I won't recommend it to young singles since people tend to associate w who they grew up with. We do have some redeeming qualities though and bigger than people think.

***Reading: What a dorky name for a city! Berks County is growing and has some beautiful farms laid out with PA German charm and orderliness. It's close to Philly, but something about "Reading proper" is just depressing and rubs me the wrong way. I can't put my finger on it and NO it's not the demographics. Reading does have an underrated skyline. Many young people I know smirk when Reading is mentioned. I wouldn't call it hip... I hear Kutztown is a cute college town

***Hagerstown/Frederick/Gettysburg have some attractive, quaint areas, are growing, but I'd imaging it's mainly commuters or retirees. I haven't explored this region much however.

I'd appreciate any input, esp regarding the future job marlet potential for these areas. Feel free to add a place I didn't mention.

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I just threw in NYC for the heck of it, The Poconos dur to the rapid growth, and Wilkes-Barre/Scranton for comparison sake since I live there... Since Florida and Arizona are too far away from family and roots for many, and since the region (Philly, Wilmington, Lancaster, York, DC...) has the mildest winters of its Latitude with exception of the west coast... I thought I'd bring attention to the region. Ususlly on economic rankings lists the cities of the NE that rank the highest seem to be Wilmington, Harrisburg, or DC. Also in numeric growth this area one of the fastest growing outside the real sunbelt.

I wouldn't think too much with the poll remembering that it is subjective... But it would be nice to compare the pros and cons of each metro mentioned. (Giving the scoop in "tell it like it is" East Coast style) ;)

Mainly I'm concerned with job growth potential and job availability... but cost of living, rents, crime, popularity among young singles, and what KIND of jobs are most abundant, are important also...

I'll try to give what I know:

NYC- too $$$, everyone already knows the good points ;)

Philly, not sure what the job market is like...the crime rate seems no worse than any city it's size, I'd imagine it's not cheap. Average High/Low in January 40/24 F, Average snowfall, 20"- Comparable to the Ohio Valley or Missouri minus the tornados.

Harrisburg/Lancaster/York- Seems like a non-threatening choice. It's building a Tech school DT. Always rates well in economy, crime and cost of living stats. Close to the big citie, moderately fast growing. Seems to have a moderately open, friendly and accepting feel despite being in a region of very "red" counties. Definately less "east coast attitude"there than in points North and East... It could use some more educational oppertunities however and the traffic can be rather disorganized. Many people down there seem to be content and remind me that there is more there than state jobs.

Wilmington- Does great on all the statistics, has a nice skyline and is growing fast. Has a reputation for crime despite doing OK statistically. I havent spent much time there. It does seem that many people still make faces when I mention or ask about the place. I guess it sits in Philly's shadow.

***DC does great as any sunbelt metro in statistics, is surprisingly clean, and I have a friend there who loves it. It is $$$ unless you have the right job and degree. One thing though I did find it to have a sterile-ness about it in a lot of ways.

***Baltimore I haven't spent much time in, from what I know it doesn't do well as far as economy, growth, or crime statistics. The reputation for crime is still bad. Otherwise there is a lot about Baltimore that I like. My one friend has a terrible time finding work there... OK OK he was an Anthropology/Art History major but I was Social Sciences/Social Services so I'd be in a similar boat. Liberal arts majors are people too ;)

***The Poconos are growing fast, but mainly w/ people commuting to other places. Most of that growth seems to be suburban families and retirees. E Stroudsburg is also a growing college town. The winters are NOT fun however.

***The Lehigh Valley is growing fast, they seem to have several industries and Bethlehem has a very charming DT. I was just there last weekend. Lots of the growth however is suburban, it's not ugly sprawl, but I fear it's developing more of a bedroom community identity.

***Scranton/W-B: I'm more interested in hearing OTHER people's take on my home. It makes it easier to comapre. The population continues to decline- esp in the Valley. I also feel the terrain helps to isolate us, look at PA on a detailed physical map, most of the action is south of blue mtn. We have a strong Hometown feel, New England charm and Heritage, St Patrick's Day, Italian and Polish food, very loyal close-knit neighborhoods, low violent crime, cheap housing, very clean and well laid out by New Englanders. The job market is just DEPRESSING! The wages are among the lowest in the nation. You need to know someone and learn the secret handshakes to get a decent job (Yes I know cliques are everywhere, but there seems to be something exceptionally clannish and standoffish about the Northern end of the coal region- maybe Yankee stoicism? It's intangeable but definately there!). Young people are still leaving. Old families still seem to have influence. Some people love it here but that content is based more on "SORRY the grass is NOT greener on the other side-welcome to life" than enthusiam toward NE-PA. I think the isolating (though attractive) terrain along with that pessimism, fear of change and cynicism I described here and on other threads are the biggest enemies here. It's nice to raise a family and great to be "FROM"...I won't recommend it to young singles since people tend to associate w who they grew up with. We do have some redeeming qualities though and bigger than people think.

***Reading: What a dorky name for a city! Berks County is growing and has some beautiful farms laid out with PA German charm and orderliness. It's close to Philly, but something about "Reading proper" is just depressing and rubs me the wrong way. I can't put my finger on it and NO it's not the demographics. Reading does have an underrated skyline. Many young people I know smirk when Reading is mentioned. I wouldn't call it hip... I hear Kutztown is a cute college town

***Hagerstown/Frederick/Gettysburg have some attractive, quaint areas, are growing, but I'd imaging it's mainly commuters or retirees. I haven't explored this region much however.

I'd appreciate any input, esp regarding the future job marlet potential for these areas. Feel free to add a place I didn't mention.

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I admit upfront to my bias, but Baltimore, according to recent reports in the BALTIMORE SUN is booming, yes jobs can be hard to come by, but that's only in certain fields. DC is just a short train ride a way for the commute. The cost of living is quite favorable compared to any other major Mid-Atlantic city. Further, recent statistic suggest that Baltimore is growing in population.

For the record, I live in Cleveland, not Baltimore.

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Well if you go literally by many Geography textbooks defining the Mid Atlantic and regional branding by state, Than Buffalo, Pittsburgh, The Aderondacks, Plattsburgh, NY and so on would be condidered Mid-Atlantic. While Wilmington DE would be considered southern just like Natchez, Miss. or Charleston, SC... Regional Branding is just not a perfect science.

I think it would be most interesting to compare what kind of jobs are most available in each metro, many of those ranking tables may show great job growth in a certain city but fail to specify what's behing those rankings.

For example: Rochester MN may score high ecomonically due to the Mayo Clinic and the medical jobs, However if your an art major or are an aspiring movie star, then that metro might not be your best option.

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That could apply for everywhere, there's not many places that specialize in every field, most of the time it's the technical fields like IT, engineering, and business, law and medical that get looked at the most.

Personally, I think DC-B'more is exactly mid-atlantic, it truly has southern and northern qualities as opposed to philly and nyc for the most part, and whhat the hell does buffalo have to do with the midatlantic. the Mid-Atlantic should be a designation with meaning, eithe middle of the atlantic seaboard or a transisition between north and south, b/c we all know drawing a line is dumb. I personally don't know how NYC could be mid-atlantic.

If you were to come down to B'more or DC you'd find that many people and businesses, etc. refer to the region or their company as mid-atlantic before south or northeast.

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I dont know. read that NY, NJ, DE and PA were considered the mid atlantic states. Oh well it doesnt really matter.

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I'd say DC and Baltimore show the most promise aside from NYC and it's metro.

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I voted Washington, D.C. because I am quite familiar with it. My father lived there in the 1960's when he was young and it was a boomtown even then. He said jobs and work in almost anything you wanted to do were always plentiful. Today, that is still true. The DC area has low unemployment, and fantastic job opportunities. The jobs, I've read, are growing faster than the labor force. I have also read, and seen on television, that 42% of the labor force of the Washington area has at least a Bachelor's Degree. It is one of the most highly educated area's in the nation. It has become a center of high tech industry, most people are not aware that Montgomery County MD has a huge biotechnology industry, while Northern Virginia has computer and Internet related tech. The Washington metropolitan area has had several periods of rapid growth. It is usually the fastest growing major metro in the northeast. It's metro grew by 23% in the 80's, and by 16% in the 90's. Washington remains my favorite American city, although it does have serious problems still. There are still neighborhoods that it's not safe to venture into in broad daylight. I do hope Washington continues it's success though. Naturally, Philadelphia is successful, and it is NOT in decline as some would have you believe. It will always be successful, as Boston will be. NY will always be NY, enough said, it is perhaps the most famous city in the world, with Paris and London and Rome and Tokyo. It has it all and more, sometimes too much. I think Washington being the national capital, the presence of the Federal government and the highly educated work force works in DC's favor. DC's cultural offerings are significant as well, with many great museums, theaters, monuments, history, libraries, dining, entertainment, etc.

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