Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Allan

Allan's Detroit: 2005 - Year in Review

Recommended Posts

Skyline from midtown.

IMG_9529.jpg

The Scovel Presbyterian Church burned in late February, leaving a burned out shell. The unused church was a landmark along Grand River Avenue for over one hundred years. An empty dirt lot has taken the church

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Those are some nice pics, thanks for sharing them Allan. It's too bad they closed the old aquarium, although I guess with it being as old as it is it would be hard to keep it going. By the way why are the owners of the shop being transferred to Germany?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The aquarium was quite small, and the city just doesn't have enough money to keep things like that running anymore. There has been talk of building a large aquarium like Chicago, Atlanta, or Boston have on the riverfront, but the city couldn't even keep the tiny Belle Isle Aquarium open, so don't expect to see one being constructed anytime soon.

Cafe de Troit was owned by Lee & Patrick Padgett. Patrick is an engineer at Ford, and he had the opportunity to transfer to Germany, and it was an opportunity too good to pass up. Last time I talked to Lee, they still had not sold the cafe, but had several interested parties. The thought is that the cafe will move to the new Opera House parking garage about a block away if it is purchased.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The aquarium was quite small, and the city just doesn't have enough money to keep things like that running anymore. There has been talk of building a large aquarium like Chicago, Atlanta, or Boston have on the riverfront, but the city couldn't even keep the tiny Belle Isle Aquarium open, so don't expect to see one being constructed anytime soon.

Cafe de Troit was owned by Lee & Patrick Padgett. Patrick is an engineer at Ford, and he had the opportunity to transfer to Germany, and it was an opportunity too good to pass up. Last time I talked to Lee, they still had not sold the cafe, but had several interested parties. The thought is that the cafe will move to the new Opera House parking garage about a block away if it is purchased.

Okay that makes more sense now. I wasn't sure what you were talking about in being transferred when you have a small cafe. Didn't realize he had another job too. :D Do you know if there are plans for the old aquarium?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The aquarium will probably sit and rot away until it deteriorates so much that it must be torn down. That seems to be the case with most city-owned abandoned buildings, unfortunately. The building requires expensive roof repairs, and the city doesn't have money to do them. The amount of money needed to maintain the small structure was a lare factor in Kwame's decision to close the aquarium.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the first one of the skyline and the one of the skyline you took from Belle Isle (probably my favorite of the bunch). That shot of the aquarium looks nice, too. Great work! Thanks for bringing us some great Detroit pics to look at throughout the year! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, IC! I always struggle putting these collections together. I took me about a month to go through all 36,000 photos from the 2005 calendar year. I had to somehow pull together a well-balanced collection of photos from different neighborhoods, different seasons, and of specific events. Admittedly, much of my best work has been left off of this thread.

As for that Belle Isle shot, I chose that particular one because of the ice floating on the river. It was taken last January, but the river is again begining to develop ice floes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work Allan! My favorite would have to be the shot from Campus Martius Park, fantastic picture!

I have never been to Detroit, but from what I have seen and heard, many of Detroits best qualities are similar to the qualities that I love about New Orleans. Old, historic, gritty cities that have had many problems with population loss, crime, government, and job loss over the last few decades, but have managed to keep those quality's that make them special.

Coming from a complete outsider, I think you did a great job of catching Detroit. Great job, and here's to a great 2006 for you! :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, IC! I always struggle putting these collections together. I took me about a month to go through all 36,000 photos from the 2005 calendar year. I had to somehow pull together a well-balanced collection of photos from different neighborhoods, different seasons, and of specific events. Admittedly, much of my best work has been left off of this thread.

As for that Belle Isle shot, I chose that particular one because of the ice floating on the river. It was taken last January, but the river is again begining to develop ice floes.

36,000 pics! Wow...though I guess it should be expected for someone who is as in to photography as you are. Perhaps it's just because I've spent so much time with film, but I seem to bee a bit more of a minimalist with my pics. Some great pics there, I assure you.

I also must say that river shot makes me wish my city (Atlanta) had a nice river flowing next to downtown (the Chattahoochee is on the outskirts oftown and its not really much to look at nowadays.

Anotther favorite of mine is that one of the neighborhood kids posing with the firewoman after the fire. So charming :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Technically the Detroit River is actually a straight - it connect Lake St. Clair to the north with Lake Erie to the south.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great work Allan! My favorite would have to be the shot from Campus Martius Park, fantastic picture!

I have never been to Detroit, but from what I have seen and heard, many of Detroits best qualities are similar to the qualities that I love about New Orleans. Old, historic, gritty cities that have had many problems with population loss, crime, government, and job loss over the last few decades, but have managed to keep those quality's that make them special.

New Orleans is my favorite southern city because the moment I arrived there, it reminded me so much of Detroit (aside from the touristy places of course). ;)

These photos are fantastic, Allan. They're so honest...just the way I like them. I love Detroit so much!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those houses on Trumbull Avenue in Woodbridge look to be well kept but I've heard that there are countless residences like those that fall into disrepair and blight. It is both amazing and sad that cities such have Detroit have residential districts with such potential. Same can be said for North Philadelphia too. Both places have rows upon rows of architectural gems that are left blighted and forgotten. Here's to hoping that someday it will turn around and those great homes will be brought back to their former glory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woodbridge is a neighborhood in transition. Many of the old Victorians on Trumbull were lost decades ago. There are a few that still stand in ruin, awaiting restoration or demolition. The most well-known decayed mansions are in an area just north of downtown called Brush Park.

There are tours of Woodbridge here, here, and here.

There are tours of Brush Park here and here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.