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Mith242

Kentucky's Bourbon Whiskey

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Sorry if my topic doesn't really fit into everyone's idea of 'urban' discussion. But I like to delve into unique and cultural aspects also. And one that comes to my mind with Kentucky is bourbon. I know a little bit about the history of it but I thought it would be more fun to have someone with closer ties to the state talk more about it. Or does anyone have any preferences? :D

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Well believe it or not there was story about distilleries on the History Channel last night on Modern Marvels. They had a few comments on Kentucky Whiskey.

  • Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey is make from the distillation of corn fermented by the addition of yeast, water and sugar. After the distillation process it is a colorless, odorless liquid.

  • The water in Kentucky is particularly suited for Bourbon making because it has the right mix of minerals for the process.

  • Once the alcohol it distilled it is put into barrels made from American white oak and aged. The aging process in these barrels is what gives Kentucky Bourbon its characteristic color and flavor. The alcohol reacts with this particular wood.

  • Once the aging process is completed the barrels are tapped and the Whiskey bottled.

  • Interestingly, the barrels are only used once to make the Kentucky Bourbon. However the barrels are then sold to the Scottish who reuse the barrels to make Scotch Whiskey. They buy every single barrel as the aged barrels have the right substances to make their brand of Whiskey. Its an interesting relationship between the two.

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Well believe it or not there was story about distilleries on the History Channel last night on Modern Marvels. They had a few comments on Kentucky Whiskey.
  • Kentucky Bourbon Whiskey is make from the distillation of corn fermented by the addition of yeast, water and sugar. After the distillation process it is a colorless, odorless liquid.

  • The water in Kentucky is particularly suited for Bourbon making because it has the right mix of minerals for the process.

  • Once the alcohol it distilled it is put into barrels made from American white oak and aged. The aging process in these barrels is what gives Kentucky Bourbon its characteristic color and flavor. The alcohol reacts with this particular wood.

  • Once the aging process is completed the barrels are tapped and the Whiskey bottled.

  • Interestingly, the barrels are only used once to make the Kentucky Bourbon. However the barrels are then sold to the Scottish who reuse the barrels to make Scotch Whiskey. They buy every single barrel as the aged barrels have the right substances to make their brand of Whiskey. Its an interesting relationship between the two.

Yeah it is an interesting relationship between the two. I appreciate bourbon but I must admit I'm more of a scotch man myself. I heard that they started using the bourbon barrels because the ships wouldn't want the barrels back and those industrious Scots had to do something with those barrels. It eventually got to where people liked the scotch aged in bourbons barrels more. While some scotches now also aged their product in other used containers such as sherry casks and such I believe that all scotch still spends part of it's life in bourbon barrels.

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Sorry if my topic doesn't really fit into everyone's idea of 'urban' discussion. But I like to delve into unique and cultural aspects also. And one that comes to my mind with Kentucky is bourbon. I know a little bit about the history of it but I thought it would be more fun to have someone with closer ties to the state talk more about it. Or does anyone have any preferences? :D

Personally for me, it is Woodford Reserve (Labrot & Graham) for the finer nights out in Nashville or back home in Kentucky. Made proudly in Woodford County, KY just minutes from downtown Lexington. The distillery is awesome! I used to wake up in the sumer mornings and smell the whiskey in the air. Wild Turkey was just down the road on the outskirts of town too!!! LOL!!! Central Kentucky is one of the greatest Liquor producers in the world bar none. A trip to the MANY distillers up that way is well worth it IMO. Free samples abound!

Woodford Reserve is part of the Brown and Forman family and is made by Labrot & Graham.

Here is the Woodford Reserve bottle and Distillery in Versailles, KY.

woodford_res.jpg

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Thanks for the info Lexy. After having scotch for quite a while I've been considering getting a bottle of bourbon. If I do I'd like to try something nice so I can get a good feel for what a real bourbon can do.

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Thanks for the info Lexy. After having scotch for quite a while I've been considering getting a bottle of bourbon. If I do I'd like to try something nice so I can get a good feel for what a real bourbon can do.

Well Woodford Reserve is a great, higher class drink that is smooth and very tasty for a bourbon. It has a wonderful warm feeling and just a treat in and of itself to have anytime. The best time to drink this one is at night, of course. LOL!

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Anyone have any other bourbons to recommend or maybe explain the differences between Bourbon and Tennessee Whiskey?

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I saw the same history channel, modern marvels, special and this is the way i understand it: whiskey is a type of liquor, its only true bourbon if it comes from kentucky. the same applies to scotch(scotland), merlot(merlot, france) etc. Of course most manufacturers dont hold true to this.

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I saw the same history channel, modern marvels, special and this is the way i understand it: whiskey is a type of liquor, its only true bourbon if it comes from kentucky. the same applies to scotch(scotland), merlot(merlot, france) etc. Of course most manufacturers dont hold true to this.

Most of that is true, although merlot is a type of grape. I've gotten the impression that Tennessee whiskey is rahter similar to bourbon but even if it was made exactly it won't be called a bourbon because this name can only be applied to Kentucky. A bit like champagne and cognac in France. If it's made outside those areas it becomes sparkling wine and brandy.

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