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Mith242

The Hispanic Community in NWA

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I thought we had a topic like this already but I couldn't find it. Guess it was in the general Arkansas forum. Anyway I heard this a while back ago but forgot about it because the Arkansas forum was really going there for a while and I got lost into all the new posts. Anyway everyone associates the Hispanics here in NWA to being Mexican. But apparently there's a fast growing Salvadoran community growing here in NWA. Apparently there's even some shops catering to them and not just the Mexican or general hispanic community. I just thought it was interesting and thought it would be nice to have a topic dedicated to discussing the hispanic community in the NWA subforum.

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The Hispanic Community in East and North Rogers is vibrantly seen on many neighborhoods. There are even neighborhoods that are pure 100% Hispanic.

We have ranges from Salvadorian, Mexican, Belizian, Hondurans, and Nicaraguans.

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The Hispanic Community in East and North Rogers is vibrantly seen on many neighborhoods. There are even neighborhoods that are pure 100% Hispanic.

We have ranges from Salvadorian, Mexican, Belizian, Hondurans, and Nicaraguans.

I know there have been some small numbers of Hispanics other than Mexicans but you rarely hear about the others. Although I admit overall I believe most of the Hispanics in NWA have been Mexicans. But it does sound like the Salvadorans are beginning to become a more noticeable group. I've always wondered about all the countries that are represented here in NWA. For that matter I've been trying to figure out if there's any one area of Mexico that many of the Mexicans here in NWA are from. But from what little I've been able to figure out there doesn't seem to be much of a pattern. Any Mexican Hispanics you see could be from southern Mexico as much as they could be from central Mexico. I do think northern Mexico tends to be a little more well off because of all the American factories built close to the border. But many Mexicans have left other areas of southern or central Mexico to go to northern Mexico that it's hard to keep up with population movements.

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At least there aren't segregated neighborhoods here like in many bigger cities. There is no "Little Mexico" in NWA. You may find areas that seem to be 100% Hispanic but there are Hispanics in every neighborhood in NWA... well maybe not every neighborhood. There are some coops that don't seem to have any Hispanics but I'm positive it has nothing to do with their ethnicity.

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Here's an article from Arkansas Business about a new Spanish language newspaper for NWA. It will be a weekly to compete with a couple of others Spanish laguage weeklies that are both owned by the Stephens group. It cited the fact that the hispanic population is now above 50,000 in NWA.

http://www.arkansasbusiness.com/news/artic...75%7D&aid=42960

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Here's an article from Arkansas Business about a new Spanish language newspaper for NWA. It will be a weekly to compete with a couple of others Spanish laguage weeklies that are both owned by the Stephens group. It cited the fact that the hispanic population is now above 50,000 in NWA.

http://www.arkansasbusiness.com/news/artic...75%7D&aid=42960

50,000 in NWA seems about right. There's about 18,000 in Rogers and 25,000 in Springdale with the rest in Bentonville, Fayetteville, etc.

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50,000 in NWA seems about right. There's about 18,000 in Rogers and 25,000 in Springdale with the rest in Bentonville, Fayetteville, etc.

I wonder how many there are in central Arkansas. I also wonder what services hispanics have in central Arkansas compared to NWA.

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I wonder how many there are in central Arkansas. I also wonder what services hispanics have in central Arkansas compared to NWA.

Is Benton & Washington Counties the most heavily populated Latino Counties in Arkansas?

I thought I heard about another that had more per capita than us.

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Is Benton & Washington Counties the most heavily populated Latino Counties in Arkansas?

I thought I heard about another that had more per capita than us.

There might be some sparsely populated county somewhere that has a higher percentage I suppose. But I believe we have the largest amount is here in NWA. I don't even think central Arkansas has 50,000. And since we have a smaller population than central Arkansas too means we have a higher percentage as well.

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There might be some sparsely populated county somewhere that has a higher percentage I suppose. But I believe we have the largest amount is here in NWA. I don't even think central Arkansas has 50,000. And since we have a smaller population than central Arkansas too means we have a higher percentage as well.

I just did some searching and whatever county contains Russelville has around 25%+ hispanic makeup.

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I just did some searching and whatever county contains Russelville has around 25%+ hispanic makeup.

Interesting, well we may not have the highest percentage, maybe metro-wise we would. But I'm pretty sure we have the highest overall numbers. On a slightly different note I noticed the hispanic journalist on KNWA is leaving for a job in California. I'm hoping they'll continue with their hispanic story that they do once a week or so.

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Interesting, well we may not have the highest percentage, maybe metro-wise we would. But I'm pretty sure we have the highest overall numbers. On a slightly different note I noticed the hispanic journalist on KNWA is leaving for a job in California. I'm hoping they'll continue with their hispanic story that they do once a week or so.

I hope they keep up the hispanic broadcast. Not that I watch it, but it certainly does make others feel welcome in the area. I hadn't heard about one leaving to go to California, but I'm sure the position will fill very quickly.

IMO, the Hispanic Growth in Rogers has tapered down a bit. I think the majority of them are going to Springdale for better work opportunities, as most of the blue collar jobs are being created there. Rogers is shifting more towards Office related jobs.

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I hope they keep up the hispanic broadcast. Not that I watch it, but it certainly does make others feel welcome in the area. I hadn't heard about one leaving to go to California, but I'm sure the position will fill very quickly.

IMO, the Hispanic Growth in Rogers has tapered down a bit. I think the majority of them are going to Springdale for better work opportunities, as most of the blue collar jobs are being created there. Rogers is shifting more towards Office related jobs.

I think overall they were focusing on trying to help the rest of the community aware with what's going on in the hispanic community. But since I watch KNWA I liked seeing them focus on a hispanic story at least once a week.

Overall I don't think the hispanic growth has been that strong lately. I could be wrong and not looking in the right areas like say Springdale. But it just seems to me that there hasn't been as many noticeable increases like there was for quite a while.

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Overall I don't think the hispanic growth has been that strong lately. I could be wrong and not looking in the right areas like say Springdale. But it just seems to me that there hasn't been as many noticeable increases like there was for quite a while.

Yes, I think we will continue seeing the Hispanic community come to NWA, but it won't be like the boom we experienced the past 6 or so years. The majority come for jobs dealing in the blue collar and manufacturing sector. I think that smaller communities in NWA will see greater per capita hispanic growth in the future due to more Blue Collar Jobs.

Tell me, how Hispanic is Fayetteville?

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Yes, I think we will continue seeing the Hispanic community come to NWA, but it won't be like the boom we experienced the past 6 or so years. The majority come for jobs dealing in the blue collar and manufacturing sector. I think that smaller communities in NWA will see greater per capita hispanic growth in the future due to more Blue Collar Jobs.

Tell me, how Hispanic is Fayetteville?

Not very much. I think a number of hispanics work here but live in places like Springdale. It's much cheaper there. Fayetteville traditionally has been one of the more 'desirable' places to live in NWA. So I think overall it's a bit more expensive and harder to find places to live here. Not to say there aren't more expensive places in Rogers and such. But just taking the city as a whole.

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Yes, I think we will continue seeing the Hispanic community come to NWA, but it won't be like the boom we experienced the past 6 or so years. The majority come for jobs dealing in the blue collar and manufacturing sector. I think that smaller communities in NWA will see greater per capita hispanic growth in the future due to more Blue Collar Jobs.

Tell me, how Hispanic is Fayetteville?

I think that the key is that the first generation came for the lowest end jobs. If the community is to be successful, they need to move into the mainstream, take advantage of the great schools and advance.

Then "blue collar" jobs will not be an indicator of the presence of the hispanic community.

For the record, I've never liked the tv segments that cater to one particular ethnic group, or Spanish language television, etc. I think it creates more division and hinders the integration and advancement of the newcomers.

I think new immigrant Spanish speaking Hispanics may fare better in the long run in small towns because of the pressure to integrate into the mainstream because they don't have Spanish television, newspaper, etc... It may be tougher for the first generation, but the generations that follow are able to fully participate in society and become full members of mainstream society. In a larger city like Dallas, (sorry to continuously use it, but thats where I live) its entirely possible to conduct one's life in Spanish.

It may be convenient for the first generation, but in my opinion, its not the best for the long term success of their descendants.

My anecdotal evidence for this is my best friend since Second grade.. He is hispanic american, and moved to Arkansas at age 8. His grandparents and his cousins lived theirs lives in East LA in a Hispanic neighborhood with heavy influences in Spanish, which to some degree limited their life opportunities. My friend attended small town school, excelled in everything, doesn't even speak Spanish more than the average kid who has had a college course or two, and is well on his way to being successful.

I think he would tell you that his life has much more potential than those relatives of his who grew up in a Hipsanic incubator like east L.A.

Rant over.

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Tell me, how Hispanic is Fayetteville?

According to the 2000 Census:

Races in Fayetteville:

White Non-Hispanic (84.0%)

Black (5.1%)

Hispanic (4.9%)

Two or more races (2.4%)

American Indian (2.3%)

Other race (2.0%)

Chinese (0.9%)

Other Asian (0.6%)

Races in Springdale:

White Non-Hispanic (74.1%)

Hispanic (19.7%)

Other race (11.1%)

Two or more races (2.3%)

American Indian (1.8%)

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (1.6%)

Other Asian (1.2%)

Black (0.8%)

Races in Rogers:

White Non-Hispanic (76.9%)

Hispanic (19.3%)

Other race (9.4%)

Two or more races (1.8%)

American Indian (1.7%)

Vietnamese (0.8%)

Races in Russellville:

White Non-Hispanic (88.4%)

Black (5.2%)

Hispanic (3.3%)

Other race (1.7%)

Two or more races (1.4%)

American Indian (1.4%)

(Total can be greater than 100% because Hispanics could be counted in other races)

According to the 2000 Census Springdale has about 9,000 Hispanics and Rogers has around 7,500 Hispanics. Huh? Tell me again why we pay Federal Taxes? I want to know just how much of our taxes is being paid to the guys doing the census anyway?

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I think that the key is that the first generation came for the lowest end jobs. If the community is to be successful, they need to move into the mainstream, take advantage of the great schools and advance.

Then "blue collar" jobs will not be an indicator of the presence of the hispanic community.

For the record, I've never liked the tv segments that cater to one particular ethnic group, or Spanish language television, etc. I think it creates more division and hinders the integration and advancement of the newcomers.

I think new immigrant Spanish speaking Hispanics may fare better in the long run in small towns because of the pressure to integrate into the mainstream because they don't have Spanish television, newspaper, etc... It may be tougher for the first generation, but the generations that follow are able to fully participate in society and become full members of mainstream society. In a larger city like Dallas, (sorry to continuously use it, but thats where I live) its entirely possible to conduct one's life in Spanish.

It may be convenient for the first generation, but in my opinion, its not the best for the long term success of their descendants.

My anecdotal evidence for this is my best friend since Second grade.. He is hispanic american, and moved to Arkansas at age 8. His grandparents and his cousins lived theirs lives in East LA in a Hispanic neighborhood with heavy influences in Spanish, which to some degree limited their life opportunities. My friend attended small town school, excelled in everything, doesn't even speak Spanish more than the average kid who has had a college course or two, and is well on his way to being successful.

I think he would tell you that his life has much more potential than those relatives of his who grew up in a Hipsanic incubator like east L.A.

Rant over.

I certainly see your point. I think it's great for people to remember their roots and ancestry but at the same time learn to also be a part of our society. In a lot of ways I guess I generally like seeing some of the services and such catering to hispanics more to the fact of people just realizing that they exist, they aren't going away and they are going to be a part of this are whether people like it or not. But I guess there could be a fine line between offering services and such to help them from feeling so overwhelmed in a different culture and making it too easy for them not to become a bigger part of our society.

According to the 2000 Census:

Races in Fayetteville:

White Non-Hispanic (84.0%)

Black (5.1%)

Hispanic (4.9%)

Two or more races (2.4%)

American Indian (2.3%)

Other race (2.0%)

Chinese (0.9%)

Other Asian (0.6%)

Races in Springdale:

White Non-Hispanic (74.1%)

Hispanic (19.7%)

Other race (11.1%)

Two or more races (2.3%)

American Indian (1.8%)

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander (1.6%)

Other Asian (1.2%)

Black (0.8%)

Races in Rogers:

White Non-Hispanic (76.9%)

Hispanic (19.3%)

Other race (9.4%)

Two or more races (1.8%)

American Indian (1.7%)

Vietnamese (0.8%)

Races in Russellville:

White Non-Hispanic (88.4%)

Black (5.2%)

Hispanic (3.3%)

Other race (1.7%)

Two or more races (1.4%)

American Indian (1.4%)

(Total can be greater than 100% because Hispanics could be counted in other races)

According to the 2000 Census Springdale has about 9,000 Hispanics and Rogers has around 7,500 Hispanics. Huh? Tell me again why we pay Federal Taxes? I want to know just how much of our taxes is being paid to the guys doing the census anyway?

I think one problem is how many hispanics are legal and how many illegal. I also think the Census Buerau sometimes has a hard time keeping up with a lot of hispanics because some tend to move around a lot. I also think many hispanics even legal ones have a distrust to anyone in a government agency even if it's the Census Bureau.

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I was reading in Sunday's Paper an article about Hispanic Military Recruitment in NW Arkansas, and the article said that 23% of Arkansas's Hispanics live in Northwest Arkansas!!!

I was suprised, I always though we had around 10% or so, but we also have the highest density of Hispanics in the state.

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I was reading in Sunday's Paper an article about Hispanic Military Recruitment in NW Arkansas, and the article said that 23% of Arkansas's Hispanics live in Northwest Arkansas!!!

I was suprised, I always though we had around 10% or so, but we also have the highest density of Hispanics in the state.

That is a lot. You'd expect the largest ethnic groups to be in the biggest cities in Arkansas, which BTW, according to Springdale's special census they are the 3rd largest city in Arkansas behind Little Rock and Fort Smith. "At least until their sister city to the south completes their special census", mayor Van Hoose said.

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I was reading in Sunday's Paper an article about Hispanic Military Recruitment in NW Arkansas, and the article said that 23% of Arkansas's Hispanics live in Northwest Arkansas!!!

I was suprised, I always though we had around 10% or so, but we also have the highest density of Hispanics in the state.

Really? I've always gotten the impression that we had more than 23%. I was thinking more like a third or something closer to that.

That is a lot. You'd expect the largest ethnic groups to be in the biggest cities in Arkansas, which BTW, according to Springdale's special census they are the 3rd largest city in Arkansas behind Little Rock and Fort Smith. "At least until their sister city to the south completes their special census", mayor Van Hoose said.

Uh don't remind me. :lol: Rogers isn't quite as high up there but I'd say it's not too far behind Springdale in it's amounts of hispanics.

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Uh don't remind me. :lol: Rogers isn't quite as high up there but I'd say it's not too far behind Springdale in it's amounts of hispanics.

I think Springdale's is 19.5% and Rogers's is 19.3%.

According to the 2000 Census:

Hispanics in Springdale:

Hispanic (19.7%)

Other race (11.1%)

Hispanics in Rogers:

Hispanic (19.3%)

Other race (9.4%)

Since many "Hispanics" don't identify themselves as Hispanic many would fall under the "Other race" category, which Springdale has bigger percentage of. I'm half-Puerto Rican, but my great-grandfather was a Taino Indian and not of Spanish blood. He married a woman of Spanish blood. So, I could claim to be Hispanic but I prefer to claim my Taino blood instead. Which puts me in the "White (Non-Hispanic)" category since Taino are Caribbean Indians and don't really qualify for American Indian status.

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According to the 2000 Census:

Hispanics in Springdale:

Hispanic (19.7%)

Other race (11.1%)

Hispanics in Rogers:

Hispanic (19.3%)

Other race (9.4%)

Since many "Hispanics" don't identify themselves as Hispanic many would fall under the "Other race" category, which Springdale has bigger percentage of. I'm half-Puerto Rican, but my great-grandfather was a Taino Indian and not of Spanish blood. He married a woman of Spanish blood. So, I could claim to be Hispanic but I prefer to claim my Taino blood instead. Which puts me in the "White (Non-Hispanic)" category since Taino are Caribbean Indians and don't really qualify for American Indian status.

Interesting. But yeah it does get complicated because we're not talking about a race here but more of a cultural aspect.

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