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Ramcharger

Yamasaki Studio

Yamasaki Studio; Save It or Raze It   14 members have voted

  1. 1. Should the former studio of Minoru Yamasaki be saved?

    • Save it.
      12
    • Raze it.
      2

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The building which was designed by and which housed the personal studio of Minoru Yamasaki has recently been sold to the company that owns the nearby Troy Marriott Hotel. Many people fear that when the lease held by the architectural firm which now occupies the building runs out in two years it will be razed to make way for an expansion of the hotel. A group has been formed in an attempt to save the building. Building sale in Troy sparks attempt to save city's heritage

I was wondering what all you future architects thought about this? Should the building be saved or should it make way for the hotel

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It's really the only heritage the city has. Not suprising they'd dispose of history like this. I think it should be saved. Isn't there enough space for the conference center to go up elsewhere?

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It's really the only heritage the city has.

Surely, you jest.

Was this his main office or just a temporary office while he designed few buildings in Detroit?

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Very rarely is a one story commercial building be an architectural gem, and so I will assume it is simply the man's name that gives this building any sort of credit. I have personally never seen the building, but I can tell you that with the exception of architects and architecture enthusiets, the Yamasaki names means little or nothing to the Troy community.

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Is this a non-descript office that Kamasaki just happened to have had an office in?

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If it is anything like the buildings he designed at Wayne State or CCS then it should definitely stay. I happen to like the man's work and I think it should be spared the wrecking ball if it has any architectural signifigance what so ever.

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Cant say I've seen anything of architectural significance in Troy.

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The building was designed by Yamasaki and it is where he worked during much of his career. It is where he designed the New York World Trade Center, which in itself makes the building significant in the minds of many people. The Detroit News ran an interesting bio article about Yamasaki a few years ago.

Minoru Yamasaki, world-class architect

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Surely, you jest.

Was this his main office or just a temporary office while he designed few buildings in Detroit?

Why would he be joking? There really isn't much of any architectural significance in Troy. You may have a few worthwhile, International-styled office blocks, but really nothing much outside of that. You're not debating that, are you?

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Why would he be joking? There really isn't much of any architectural significance in Troy. You may have a few worthwhile, International-styled office blocks, but really nothing much outside of that. You're not debating that, are you?

He said "it's really the only heritage the city has." He did not say the only architectural heritage. Even if he did qualify it with "architectural heritage" I'm not sure if I'd agree.

I'm no fan of Troy, but I take that statement as a hyperbole, especially if this is a merely a existing office space happened to have been used temporarily by Yamasaki.

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It was meant as both to be a sarcastic comment, and serious. Troy really has no heritiage, so if they want to build on anything as having any historical value, then saving this building would be the way to go.

Nowadays, saving these office buildings or other structures that at times seem non-descript has gained attention. The point is, it was designed by a well known architect, and is one of the city's oldest buildings, that's the serious part.

Just look at Northland Mall. Historians would scream if demolition ever threatended that place... and to think, look what its done to Detroit.

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He said "it's really the only heritage the city has." He did not say the only architectural heritage. Even if he did qualify it with "architectural heritage" I'm not sure if I'd agree.

I'm no fan of Troy, but I take that statement as a hyperbole, especially if this is a merely a existing office space happened to have been used temporarily by Yamasaki.

If the history of Troy was really all that storied and sigificant, it would have developed into an actual city, and not some non-descript, quintessential sprawlburb. It's great to have civic pride, but let's get real here. In terms of history and heritage, Troy is no Detroit, Kalamazoo, Grand Rapids, Flint...heck, it doesn't even have half the character of other established Detroit suburbs such as Dearborn, Royal Oak, or even Southfield, IMO. Really, I'm not trying to be mean, but I don't see very much redeeming about Troy besides the fact that it managed to capitalize off of White Flight and disinvestment in the central city and inner ring like no other municipality in Metro Detroit. That is it's only claim to fame as far as I'm concerned.

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