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SoMplsGuy

Mill Area Project

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Anybody see the front page of the Star Trib? Is it just me or are we taking our reverance for the flour milling industry of 100 years ago a bit far? They have voted down this amazing project because it somehow takes away from the flour making history of the area. I just can't figure out why they don't want tall buildings nearby - there are tall buildings all over the place. The falls and pinnacle are just down the way, there is another 20 something story one right across from Nicollet island and downtown is in plain sight right across the river. I don't think that these buildings have kept all of us from enjoying the rich heritage and amazing excitement of a grey four story building that was milling flour just after the civil war. The proposal is amazing - a whole new neighborhood where there is now only trash strewn parking lots. Are we trying to be a vibrant, exciting city to live and work in or are we a museum where a bus load of kids could park in one of many parking lots, be explained all the facets of 19th century flour making and then leave without being distracted by any attractive condo hi-rises or bustling neighborhoods.

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Is it totally shot down now, or is it going back to the table for reworking? I think keeping all the buildings under the red tile building's height would actually create monotony. The proposal seemed attractive. The heights were varied. The profiles were slender. The buildings had breathing room in between and weren't looming right on top of the mills. Didn't seem that outrageous to me.

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You know, for once, it wasn't even really the NIMBY's. The neighborhood had put together a petition endorsing the project. It was some heratige comission who put on the brakes.

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Hey.. it's unfortunate for the developers... but I think it will eventually even out. I think they'll either rework the project that can make everyone happy or they'll have to find something different for the area... it happens. Everyone has their interests in the box and we shouldn't just ignore preservationalists just because we're on a building spree. Are we building because it really benefits the area or are we endorsing this project for the sake of building more? This was a great project (moderate in all means, except condo numbers.. and rather conservative in nature).. but sometimes more is just more.

I realize what I said doesn't make sense... conservative and moderate at the same time? I meant moderate in size, dimensions, numbers.. and conservative in appearance. It tried to respect its surroundings to a degree unlike some projects in the area.

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I generally liked this project. The buildings were slim and did allow for air and light etc.

However, the developer knew that since the 80's the height for that area had been capped. And the developer knew that the master plan for the neighborhood called for no buildings taller than the red tile one.

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However, the developer knew that since the 80's the height for that area had been capped. And the developer knew that the master plan for the neighborhood called for no buildings taller than the red tile one.

I don't doubt that the deveoper could propose a different project with lower buildings and make it work financially. It just might not be profitable enough to justify rehabbing the A-mill, red tile building, etc.

If that happens and we can expect those historic buildings to sit vacant for a long time.

Sometimes the neighborhood plans just don't account for the economic realities. This was a thoughtful project with neighborhood support. Hopefully the city council does the right thing and supports it on appeal.

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I don't doubt that the deveoper could propose a different project with lower buildings and make it work financially. It just might not be profitable enough to justify rehabbing the A-mill, red tile building, etc.

If that happens and we can expect those historic buildings to sit vacant for a long time.

Sometimes the neighborhood plans just don't account for the economic realities. This was a thoughtful project with neighborhood support. Hopefully the city council does the right thing and supports it on appeal.

Then again, maybe the developer can do it with shorter heights and still make a nice profit. Perhaps they just wanted the taller height because then they make lots and lots of profit.

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Well I'm not sure how much I'll use this forum. I prefer SSP, but I wanted to ask others to write their council members in support of this project. It's too major to just let slide.

this is Seth from Twin City Scape btw

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Well I'm not sure how much I'll use this forum. I prefer SSP, but I wanted to ask others to write their council members in support of this project. It's too major to just let slide.

this is Seth from Twin City Scape btw

HEy...what's SSP? Also, I can no longer access Twincityscape. Know what's going on?

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Oh, and it sounds like the Historical board didn't care much for the construction materials either: glass and steel. So, they want the heights at or below the red tile building and they would like more stone and concrete. Why don't they just come out and say they want a whole string of mini Pillsbury Mills along that street. How assinine. IMO, if you want the mills to stand out and remain the focus, create some juxtaposition in nearby buildings with varying heights and different building materials. In other words, more Bookmen Stacks type stuff along there and ix-nay on the Rock Island Lofts bland psuedo reminiscent crap.

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Oh, and it sounds like the Historical board didn't care much for the construction materials either: glass and steel. So, they want the heights at or below the red tile building and they would like more stone and concrete. Why don't they just come out and say they want a whole string of mini Pillsbury Mills along that street. How assinine. IMO, if you want the mills to stand out and remain the focus, create some juxtaposition in nearby buildings with varying heights and different building materials. In other words, more Bookmen Stacks type stuff along there and ix-nay on the Rock Island Lofts bland psuedo reminiscent crap.

I must admit on further consideration, I too would like to see a mix of material used in the Mill project.

If I see one more design for light colored stone and blue-green glass and stainless steel I'm gonna puke! There is absolutely no creativity in the Mill project design -- I'm not oppossed to it, but geez does anyone have an orignal design idea --ever?

Maybe they need a project runway --for architects!

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Maybe they need a project runway --for architects!

Yes, Santino. He'd have every architectural style and ornamentation blobbed into one building. And if the City Council confronted him, he'd yell back with satanic fury and venom in his eyes.

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It was approved but, the developer agreed to "alter the design of the towers so they would blend in better with the historic structures." This project, including four towers (15, 20, 24 and 27 stories), are going to have a huge impact on the area in terms of density. It will also mean another 943 condos for the downtown area.

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Minneapolis tends to use my grandfather's logic when it comes to getting approval on things..

"No"... then "Maybe".. then finally, once both parties have had time to think about it and come to a compromise, "I suppose."

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I'm surprised no one has reported this yet, but it seems that "The Minneapolis City Council voted Friday to approve a $400 million condominium development that a city commission had previously deemed too tall for the riverfront. "

This was last friday. It seems like to over ruled the Heritage Preservation Commission and gave the project two thumbs up despite the height problems.

I think this will add a lot to the riverfront district which at times feels a bit bland. I hope that in the project they will include some retail for the poepl who are goign to be living in the area.

http://twincities.bizjournals.com/twinciti...20/daily55.html

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