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Travelers Rest and their Bradford Pears

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Driving back from Asheville today, I noticed that Travelers Rest is cutting down all the Bradford Pears in the median of the highway. I know these were damaged heavily in the ice storm and the Bradford as a tree has really flawed genes. The man that invented it, along with landscapers that use it should be penalized. Well, not really, but anyway, does anyone know about this? Does Travelers Rest plan to plant replacement trees of a different type?

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They should plant new trees and possibly improve the median and side landscapes. I would rather drive through what looks like a nice tree lined throughfare rather than a barren four lane divided highway.

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Driving back from Asheville today, I noticed that Travelers Rest is cutting down all the Bradford Pears in the median of the highway. I know these were damaged heavily in the ice storm and the Bradford as a tree has really flawed genes. The man that invented it, along with landscapers that use it should be penalized. Well, not really, but anyway, does anyone know about this? Does Travelers Rest plan to plant replacement trees of a different type?

How is the Bradford Pear flawed?? I love that tree!!

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How is the Bradford Pear flawed?? I love that tree!!

Somebody else can probably answer this better as botany isn't exactly my bag. All I know is the Bradford Pear came about I believe in the 70's or 80's as the result of genetic engineering (correct term?) The tree is a fast grower with a short life span. Since all limbs branch for a common area (point) on a single trunk, it is very prone to splitting. Very common to see a Bradford Pear with half the tree missing. The landscaping community loved this tree when it first came about because it was inexpensive, beautiful in bloom, fast growing, etc. A landscapers dream (so they thought), until they started to mature and it's flaws became clear. Now, a Bradford Pear is looked down on as the lowest form of tree and most landscpaers won't go near the things. I've known friends looking at houses, to either choose not to buy a house, or negotiate a lower price, because a yard may have Bradfords. All Bradfords eventually have to be cut down. Is it safe to say, this tree will become extinct as quickly as it came about?

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I used to think they were pretty, but now I can't stand the sight of them because they add a cheapness to their surroundings. Out in the country they may dwell better accepted, but they should be outlawed in the city, IMO. Stick to hardwoods and all will be well over time. I particularly love water oaks for streetscaping. :)

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I've always been fond of the Bradford Pear Trees in the medians here in T.R.; however, T.R. City Council has discussed removing them and replacing them several times without action. This discussion was centered around visibility along the highway more than anything else.

I believe this last ice storm was the final straw. No tree was left un-damaged. Some near the T.R. B.P. Station (formerly known as the T.R. Amoco) were completely destroyed by the ice storm. They reminded me of those chocolate oranges that you find during the holidays, as if someone had picked each of them up and slammed them down. The branches fell neatly to the ground like slices of the chocolate orange.

I hope they're replaced with something more hearty.

Along this same stretch of Poinsett Highway in front of Furman are Crepe Myrtles. Since I've lived up here, many of them have been taken out by cars crossing through the median. It'd be nice if these were replaced, too.

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Indeed. The removal of these Bradford's should be applauded. There are so many better options of trees that actually provide a canopy that it is crazy to not plant those and think in the long term.

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I like crape myrtles when they are left to grow naturally, and not spliced up and cut back every year. I am fairly certain that these trees are natural to our area too.

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I like crape myrtles when they are left to grow naturally, and not spliced up and cut back every year. I am fairly certain that these trees are natural to our area too.

While crape myrtles have been used in this area for a long time, they were originally from Asia.

http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC1008.htm

This Clemson Extension website also gives proper pruning methods. I also can't stand to see them chopped back every year (aka 'crape murder').

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Bradford Pear trees smell bad.

haha :lol: That struck me as funny for some reason. Probably because its true.

While crape myrtles have been used in this area for a long time, they were originally from Asia.

http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC1008.htm

This Clemson Extension website also gives proper pruning methods. I also can't stand to see them chopped back every year (aka 'crape murder').

Indeed. They are actually quite atractive if you let them grow naturally.

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