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Residential Development in Winston-Salem

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Winston-Slame is somewhat experiencing a surge of new residential developement in and around the city. Many of these projects will change our cityscape and give us more options that we currently dont have. I thought why not create a forum about it since we talk about it so often. Here are some of the projects that we have heard about "so far."

Downtown:

West End Village

Nissen Building

Southeastern Gateway

Goler Heights

The Gallery (Goler)

Piedmont Leaf Lofts

Traders Row

Holly Village

2nd St Live-Work Condos

Tar Branch Lofts and Condos

Outside Downtown and Suburbs:

Maplewood Ave 4 new homes sub-development (Ardmore)

Brookberry Farm

Peters Creek Pkwy new development

Dell related development near Kernersville

University Pkwy new development

Development off of Stratford Rd near Clemmons

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actually the Maplewood residential development is right near my house and I must say it is exceptional! The developers, Allenstar, have recreated a new house to make it look like the old historic charm of my neighborhood Ardmore. Every house has detail in it and it wasn't a pad home development either. The only thing I question is that they are pricing them above $310,000! The average price for our part of Ardmore has got to be about $185,000. But hey it raises our land values so what do I have to complain about! I would recommend checking it out if you're a local and have the time.

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"They" say that one of the goals for helping downtown come back to life is to attract and retain the young professional.

Is the price point for most of the downtown projects (which at first glance seems on the high side compared to other traditional residential projects) going to help or hurt W-S in the above stated goal?

What needs to be done to help reach this goal?

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"They" say that one of the goals for helping downtown come back to life is to attract and retain the young professional.

Is the price point for most of the downtown projects (which at first glance seems on the high side compared to other traditional residential projects) going to help or hurt W-S in the above stated goal?

What needs to be done to help reach this goal?

I don't know that many young professionals that can afford these prices. Even doctors are not usually done with residency until their 30. I just don't think the area has the kind of jobs for young professionals that pay that kind of money, but I might be wrong. I think 200,000 for a 1 bedroom condo is high. I am not trying to be rude by no means, but downtown needs more than senior citizens to liven it up. I noticed several years ago that most of the townhomes on Marshall street near Old Salem were mostly older folks, and I was suprised at the number of older folks at the opening of The Gallery Lofts. It looks like downtown living is going to be for the old and the wealthy. Most of the folks that live near me at Southside in Greensboro are between 30 and 60, which is not a bad mix. There are a lot of cheaper apartments in downtown Greensboro that are not that expensive. Winston-Salem needs something a little cheaper for those folks in their 20's who want to live downtown. This is the kind of energy downtown needs, especially Winston.

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I don't know that many young professionals that can afford these prices. Even doctors are not usually done with residency until their 30. I just don't think the area has the kind of jobs for young professionals that pay that kind of money, but I might be wrong. I think 200,000 for a 1 bedroom condo is high. I am not trying to be rude by no means, but downtown needs more than senior citizens to liven it up. I noticed several years ago that most of the townhomes on Marshall street near Old Salem were mostly older folks, and I was suprised at the number of older folks at the opening of The Gallery Lofts. It looks like downtown living is going to be for the old and the wealthy. Most of the folks that live near me at Southside in Greensboro are between 30 and 60, which is not a bad mix. There are a lot of cheaper apartments in downtown Greensboro that are not that expensive. Winston-Salem needs something a little cheaper for those folks in their 20's who want to live downtown. This is the kind of energy downtown needs, especially Winston.

Agreed! When I think of a downtown I think of young individuals who are out walking and making stops at their favorite restaurant and shops. Having too many oldies down here with their canes and walkers makes it look like South Florida. Make some nice affordable condos downtown and the "youngens" will come.

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true, not everyone can afford $250,000 or $300,000 dollar condos. There needs to be more condos around $120,000 to $150,000. Apartments are also a plus for those young professionals just starting out. Usually its the empty nesters that by $300,000 condos. but living downtown is by no means cheap. Many downtown condos costing $300,000 would cost $170,000 if you had the same amount of living space in a suburban single family home. Sqaure footage is just more expensive downtown which is a big reason why we see so many office buildings in suburban office parks these days. Thing I like about living in downtown condos is that you no longer have to worry about cutting the grass :P

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^^ :shok: No offense to Kville but that's just crazy. I can't imagine anyone wanting to spend that much money to live there. The downtown is nice and all but pretty paltry and the only places to go are either W-S or GSO. But hey better that than building some mcmansions 50 miles from nowhere! :whistling:

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^^ :shok: No offense to Kville but that's just crazy. I can't imagine anyone wanting to spend that much money to live there. The downtown is nice and all but pretty paltry and the only places to go are either W-S or GSO. But hey better that than building some mcmansions 50 miles from nowhere! :whistling:

Exactly how I feel! There are some nice sections of DT K-ville but automatically it turns to Farmers Feed and Seed to Walgreens to McDonalds.

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Copying the ideas of other cities, I thought id add some renderings of residential projects planned/under construction in and around downtown. it looks pretty impressive when seen all at one time.

tradersrow16qt.jpg

Traders Row

towns.jpg

The Towns

4b.jpg

4th and Broad

fourthandgreen3bt.jpg

4th and Green

rehab1.jpg

Piedmont Leaf Lofts Phase 2

hollyvillage.jpg

Holly Village

oneparkvistaupload3ei.jpg

One Park Vista

874533-194a.jpg

West 7th

golermanor.jpg

Goler Manor

exterior-elevation.jpg

The Gallery

summitrend.jpg

The Summit

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More residential planned north of downtown. the mixed income neighborhood Gateway Commons just started its final phase with 128 single family homes. HAWS started this initiative to demolish and redevelop the city's housing projects into livable communites about 5 years ago. Happy Hill , east of the gateway is going through this same transition.

Gateway Commons' final phase will have 128 new family homes

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So I picked up one of those apartment hunter books today. Up until now they've had literally nothing but crappy suburban mcapartments. But I noticed a new addition to this one:

T1_-1_1217870.JPG

Pretty decent little ad, needs more pics to do justice to the views, and the building itself though. It doesn't really catch the viewer's eye to distinguish itself from the average piece of sprawling crap.

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Here's a MUCH better ad from another apartment book. This, folks is how downtown residential should be marketed! :thumbsup: The pic really shows off the building and immediately catches your eye.

T1_-1_1227387.JPG

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Ok I'm on an intellectual roll here. :w00t: Now I've been thinking for some time, this whole downtown residential thing is great. But some things have been left me wondering. The attitude, it seems is for most people and families to live in well-spaced, single-family houses and for the young, affluent professionals or retirees to live in high-rise condos i.e. the Nissen. Winston Salem has plenty of the first of course and the market for the second of those is just emerging. But I think the housing market is missing something. I think there needs to be something inbetween the two. Many people have compared Winston to northeastern cities in feel. But one thing Winston is seriously lacking in that northeastern cities have is a variety of housing, in all kinds of sizes and densities. Now I know there are some projects of this type going on in the city, and that's very good. But I'm going to put forth an idea here. I think Winston Salem need rowhouses. Small, yet comfortable brick rowhouses are an ideal way to bridge the gap in the housing market and draw a greater number and variety of people into downtown. Case in point:

110373402_157f8a0245.jpg

This pic, shamelessly ( :blush: ) stolen from this thread, shows new (as in less than 5 years old) rowhouses in Wilmington, DE. Don't they just look gorgeous! I sure think so. Now, I'm not suggesting we simply steal another city's style. In fact that's why I used this pic. This kind of housing would fit in just about any urban environment and look great. And we all know there's TONS of places in downtown that could really use a development. think: Empty lots, parking lots, etc. Imagine them with brick rowhouses like these instead! Also I know my ideas are nothing new exactly. We would all like to see the downtown area fully developed. Unfortunately our city leader seem to have different ideas about what's good development in a city center. <_< Anyway let me know what you think. Thanks for reading!

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Ok I'm on an intellectual roll here. :w00t: Now I've been thinking for some time, this whole downtown residential thing is great. But some things have been left me wondering. The attitude, it seems is for most people and families to live in well-spaced, single-family houses and for the young, affluent professionals or retirees to live in high-rise condos i.e. the Nissen. Winston Salem has plenty of the first of course and the market for the second of those is just emerging. But I think the housing market is missing something. I think there needs to be something inbetween the two. Many people have compared Winston to northeastern cities in feel. But one thing Winston is seriously lacking in that northeastern cities have is a variety of housing, in all kinds of sizes and densities. Now I know there are some projects of this type going on in the city, and that's very good. But I'm going to put forth an idea here. I think Winston Salem need rowhouses. Small, yet comfortable brick rowhouses are an ideal way to bridge the gap in the housing market and draw a greater number and variety of people into downtown. Case in point:

110373402_157f8a0245.jpg

This pic, shamelessly ( :blush: ) stolen from this thread, shows new (as in less than 5 years old) rowhouses in Wilmington, DE. Don't they just look gorgeous! I sure think so. Now, I'm not suggesting we simply steal another city's style. In fact that's why I used this pic. This kind of housing would fit in just about any urban environment and look great. And we all know there's TONS of places in downtown that could really use a development. think: Empty lots, parking lots, etc. Imagine them with brick rowhouses like these instead! Also I know my ideas are nothing new exactly. We would all like to see the downtown area fully developed. Unfortunately our city leader seem to have different ideas about what's good development in a city center. <_< Anyway let me know what you think. Thanks for reading!

Those are nice and I agree they would fit in well with the architecture of Winston-Salem. I agree with your comments about offering housing to all income levels. There are alot of people who would consider living downtown but just cannot afford it. Most of the condos offered downtown now are priced from between $170,000 to 1 Million and then you have to add Homeowners Associaton Dues on top of your monthly house payment of another $150.00 to $250.00 monthly. Someone needs to get a clue and start developing an area downtown that is not exactly low income, but priced from between $100,000 to $200,000.

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I agree that rowhouses are the most under-utilized and needed building type lacking NC cities. However, the Wilmington ones are horrible because they don't embrace the pedestrian. They seem to be pushing the pedestrian into the street to be run over.

Find some pictures of Adams Morgan in DC and you'll see rowhouses done right.

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are these considered rowhouses?

oldsalemrowhouse.jpg

rowhouses.jpg

i think there are 3 or 4 more in West End on 4th St.

Yes and yes. I think the ones at Main and Cemetery Streets as well as the ones on West Fourth Street are typologically very Winston-Salem/Southern with the porches.

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are these considered rowhouses?

oldsalemrowhouse.jpg

rowhouses.jpg

i think there are 3 or 4 more in West End on 4th St.

YESS!!! Those are both very good examples especially the first one which I find very attractive. It's just that there aren't very many of them. Not nearly enough to meet the demand anyway.

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These rowhouses are both superior to the Wilmington ones because they provide transitionary space between the public realm of the sidewalk and the private realm of the rowhouse. In one group, this is accomplished through private front garden space. In the other, there is the semi-private/semi-public space of the porch.

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These rowhouses are both superior to the Wilmington ones because they provide transitionary space between the public realm of the sidewalk and the private realm of the rowhouse. In one group, this is accomplished through private front garden space. In the other, there is the semi-private/semi-public space of the porch.

Good points. I posted those Wilm. houses simply because I wanted to show that there is considerable variety of housing being built in the USA besides just the single family house or highrise condo. I still think they're very nice looking but I understand and agree with what you said about the transitionary space.

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The Wilmington rowhouses look way too bland and "flat" in the front. One of the best examples of rowhouses done well is the historic Fan district in Richmond:

54085835.fan03.jpg

54085852.fan20.jpg

54085834.fan02.jpg

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Interestingly enough, I have heard of certain laws that require affordable housing in high priced areas. This is especially known to happen in Urban Areas. What happens is that there are certain loans that will allow people who couldn't ordinarily afford the homes in the area. Supposedly it is to protect from disenfranchisement of the lower income bracket. You can learn a whole lot at the hud website: www.hud.gov.

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