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ShowMeKC

Most underrated midwest cities?

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Pittsburgh and PA are not Midwest. There are plenty are of true Midwestern towns to discuss to add a Northeastern state to the mix, even if we are talking about Western PA which as a historical "gateway" to the West has some mix of character, it is not, nor does it consider itself Midwest.

As for the Midwest, there are so many cities that can certainly be deemed underrated. I honestly couldn't think of one dominent one though that is so greatly underrated compared to others.

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Clayton is a suburb of St. Louis, so therefore it should not be considered it's own city in this discussion.

rbdetsport-- Clayton is further from downtown STL than New Center is from downtown Detroit. Midtown St. Louis is more the equivalent to New Center.

My picks for underrated Midwest cities, no order:

Detroit

Saint Louis

Cleveland

Cincinnati

Milwaukee

Kansas City

Columbus

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What about our friends to the North (or from my prospective, East) of the border? I find that cities like Windsor and London, Ontario (not to mention Toronto) have much to offer but go very much unnoticed due to the border perception.

Personally, I have to throw a vote at Grand Rapids for the midwest's most underrated and up-and-coming city.

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Grand Rapids is by far the most underated city! Not Clayton, MO! Clayton looks nice, but do people actually live there?

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Des Moines has a great DT for the amount of people in the area. I think some of it's underrating comes from it being in the middle of Iowa's cornfields. That's one boring drive, going to Des Moines.

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Kansas City is one of the most beautiful American cities. It's one of the places in the Midwest I could see myself calling home.

Pittsburgh is as Northeast as you can get. Culture, land use, demographics. It may be awfully close to Ohio and West Virginia, but it's got Pennsylvania politics and weather.

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Kansas City is one of the most beautiful American cities.  It's one of the places in the Midwest I could see myself calling home. 

Pittsburgh is as Northeast as you can get.  Culture, land use, demographics.  It may be awfully close to Ohio and West Virginia, but it's got Pennsylvania politics and weather.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Funny you should say that about Pittsburgh. My father's family is from Pittsburgh, and my grandfather was a great Pittsburgh booster. He he took great umbrage whenever Pittsburgh was thought of us being in the Midwest. When we visited (from West Michigan), Pittsburgh seemed very exotic -- old brick buildings, steep hills, streetcars, the smell in the air, and especially that weird accent. My father always said we were going "out East" when we visited the Steel City.

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Clayton is a great city. Yes, it only exists because it's an extension of greater St. Louis. At the same time...and I don't want to make anyone angry, but it is much more impressive than Rochester, Minnesota. St. Louis is a metro area with well over 2.5 million people...and Clayton is just part of the mix.

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Hi, this is my first post in the Midwest forum, but I have lurked on here for a while.

I would have to say that Columbus, Ohio has to be one of the most underrated cities in the Midwest. Only one other person mentioned it in this thread. Yet its city population has actutally been growing (much of it by annexation, but still growing) and it's home to quite a few well-known companies. They even recently got an NHL team (for what that's worth :lol: ) I'm surprised no one's mentioned anything about it.

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Columbus is an amazing town -- I left the city 2.5 years ago, and each time I come home, I am astounded. From urban revitalization in the older communities like German, Italian, and Victorian villages, to new condo developments on 270, the town is growing, and despite Les Wexner's efforts, much of the current city planning is very exciting.

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How is Minneapolis overlooked because of Chicago? Milwaukee may be overlooked because of Chicago, but Minneapolis is farther from Chicago than pretty much every other major Midwestern city. In fact, its remoteness is probably its biggest advantage.

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I don't think Minne is underated at all. I think it's one of the most renowned Midwestern cities. It definately gets good reviews.

Detroit is pretty underated, but it doesnt fall by the wayside, it gets plenty of political, and media attention. I'd say Milwaukee is pretty underated, I would love to see more of Kansas City., and Des Moines, for a smaller to Midsize city, it definately has an Impressive skyline. Also I would like to know more about Grand Rapids Mi, it seems rather up an coming as of late.

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Hello, I just discovered UrbanPlanet today. I've lived in the midwest for about five years and haven't seen as much of the region as I would like, but I've been to the following cities and believe they're worthy of mention:

Milwaukee - People who haven't visited recently seem to be under the impression that it's dingy and dangerous. I've visited several times and have found it to be quite charming with a beautiful skyline and a surprisingly vital downtown.

Columbus - Rarely hear anything about it, good or bad - but quite liked it during a brief visit several years ago. Seemed to be quite a bit of activity and a vibrant downtown.

Kalamazoo - I lived in South Bend for awhile, didn't really mind South Bend..but I was surprised to discover the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts and some nice cafes, tree-lined streets and a pleasent downtown park. Kalamazoo feels more urban and vital than South Bend.

- Robert

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I live in Clayton and love it but it's more of a business district. It's only about 8 miles from downtown STL so I wouldn't say it's a suburb.

It's a very unique "city" because you have all of the skyscrapers, big business, etc but surrounding the "city" is a neighborhood with old mansions, smaller English-style homes, condos, and high-rise residences.

There are PLENTY of places to eat and drink but the nightlife isn't what you would think it is. Very trendy and upscale but kinda quiet...great place to start the night off.

I think the average household income in Clayton is about $135,000 per year (within a 1 mi radius) for about 16,000 residents. The city size is 2.5 sq miles and is worth an estimated $2.5 BILLION!

Here is the city's website:

Clayton Missouri

Here is a list of some of the corporations headquarted here:

Top Fifteen Major Corporations:

1. Enterprise Rent-A-Car

2. Graybar Electric

3. Sara Lee Bakery Group

4. Apex Oil

5. Furniture Brands International

6. Brown Shoe

7. D & K Healthcare

8. Harbour Group

9. Commerce Bank of St. Louis

10. Spartech

11. First Banks

12. Rehab Care

13. Barry-Wehmiller Companies

14. Sabreliner Corporation

15. Stupp Brothers

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Clayton is a unique suburb in that it has some urban qualities, but it is still very much a suburb of St. Louis, if for no other reason, location alone.

btw, my parents live in downtown Clayton.

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Thank you r0b for your endorsement of my hometown :lol: ! Milwaukee has its share of dinge and danger. We have our ghetto here like every other metro area. If you're not from here it's wise to avoid a large tract just north of downtown after dark. But given what this part of the country has been through over the last generation or so, I think we've held our own. We're no longer an industrial center and haven't been a brewing center for a long time, but culturally there's plenty going on to please locals and tourists alike. You just need to know where to look and where not to. Next time you're here, check out Water and Brady Streets for drinking and coffeehouses. The Calatrava addition has made our Art Museum into a world-class facility, not to mention Summerfest, the world's largest music festival. We don't have the cultural resources or job opportunities that Chicago does. Neither do we have their world-class problems :ph34r: .

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I'd say KC....having lived in STL, and been to most major midwestern cities, and now living in KCMO. i never thought KC was as good looking of a town as it is when i lived in STL. STL is definitely an eastward looking town, while KCMO definitely looks west.

There are a few that I AM SURE that would probably fit the bill just as well such as des moines.

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