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What food represents your state/area


Snowguy716

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I think there are a few dishes here that are very popular.

Christmas time mainstays are Lutefisk, Lefse, and Swedish Meatballs. (especially for the Lutherans)

Year round dishes are "Hot Dish", which the rest of the country calls Casserole. We eat a large amount of hot dish.

Summer food is typically grilled. Ribs, BBQ chicken, steak, burgers, hot dogs... typically American

Other things that are distinctly Minnesotan:

Jello Salad with fruit/rice and cool whip mixed in. Very popular, indeed!

Bars. These can be anything from Rice Crispy Bars to Church bars, etc.

Wild Rice Soup. While you can find this all over the country, wild rice grows naturally in Minnesota in many of our lakes and is thus very popular.

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48 oz. porterhouse and martinis? That might still be a popular lobbyist's lunch, though the restaurant scene in Washington has become more sophisticated over the past decade or two. Crabcakes are enormously popular, though increasingly expensive as the stocks dwindle in the Chesapeake Bay.

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LOL.. Pork is certainly quite a tempting and tasty treat in D.C.

I forgot to mention a Minnesota favorite: Walleye

There's nothing better than walleye fried over a campfire when you're out camping... with a squeeze of lemon and a dab of tartar sauce. Add some pan fried potatoes to that and you've got yourself set.

It also fries up very well at home :) I probably have it once a week during the summer.

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Hmmm. Good question. I guess Califonia is failry famous for it's wine production. Plenty of agriculture here, but don't know if I could come up with anything "representative". I can't say there's a regional dish either. I hope there isn't, or I'll look like a pretty dumb native Californian. :blush:

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I'd give Californian wines a fair go. There's nowhere else in America that really produces wine.. at least not in the quantity of California.

Not in the same quantities, but there are a fair number of vineyards in Western Michigan due to the unique climate created by Lake Michigan :alc:

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The vineyard craze is a over rated in my view - every region in the country now has locally produced wines, and they overwhelmingly suck. NC, GA, IN are just a few states which I've tried local wines.

California & additionally Oregon should be given credit for wine producing areas. Not all the blow joes making seriously rancid wine. It's not that people outside of CA & OR don't know how to produce good wine, but it requires generations upon generations for the vineyards to age properly. Plus a more Mediterranean climate is preferable - thus still the best wines are in Spain, France & Italy. But California has in the past decades, after 100 years of wineries, become world respected. (though I still stick to FR, SP, IT, & sometimes Argentina / Chile & Australia).

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The vineyard craze is a over rated in my view - every region in the country now has locally produced wines, and they overwhelmingly suck. NC, GA, IN are just a few states which I've tried local wines.

California & additionally Oregon should be given credit for wine producing areas. Not all the blow joes making seriously rancid wine. It's not that people outside of CA & OR don't know how to produce good wine, but it requires generations upon generations for the vineyards to age properly. Plus a more Mediterranean climate is preferable - thus still the best wines are in Spain, France & Italy. But California has in the past decades, after 100 years of wineries, become world respected. (though I still stick to FR, SP, IT, & sometimes Argentina / Chile & Australia).

Not to get in a pissing match, but Michigan's winemaking history goes back 200 years, and back to the 19th century in Western Michigan. Yes, there are a lot of "wannnabe's" jumping on board lately though. You should especially try the Cherry wines. Very interesting. :shades:

History of winemaking in Michigan

and back to the topic at hand :)

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The vineyard craze is a over rated in my view - every region in the country now has locally produced wines, and they overwhelmingly suck. NC, GA, IN are just a few states which I've tried local wines.

California & additionally Oregon should be given credit for wine producing areas. Not all the blow joes making seriously rancid wine. It's not that people outside of CA & OR don't know how to produce good wine, but it requires generations upon generations for the vineyards to age properly. Plus a more Mediterranean climate is preferable - thus still the best wines are in Spain, France & Italy. But California has in the past decades, after 100 years of wineries, become world respected. (though I still stick to FR, SP, IT, & sometimes Argentina / Chile & Australia).

A mediterranean type climate is not necessary for wine production. Grapes are able to grow all over the world. In fact many of the best regions in France like Burgundy and the Loire Valley do not have mediterranean type climates, and there are plenty of fine wines produced in Germany. True, climate and particularly soil conditions provide the framework of a good wine, however much is to be said about the gower and their practices/standards. I have had terrific wines from New Mexico, Oregon, Maine, Washington and of Course California. I'd love to try wines from MI, though they are hard to find where I am from.

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Exchequer & GRDadof3 - thanks for the correction! I'll try to keep a more open mind, but seeing all the 'tourist' vineyards such as Biltmore Estates in NC & Chateu Elan in GA, as well as that swill I tried in Indianapolis - I hope you understand my pessimism. But I'll be more considerate nonetheless...

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