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ATLman1

Columbus Transportation Projects

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Road Projects:

St. Mary's Road from Buena Vista Road to Robin Road- Description: widening from 2 to 4 lanes, landscaping and sidewalks. Projected cost: $4,525,000.

I-185 Interchange at Victory Drive- Description: Will reconstruct the interchange at I-185 and Victory Drive. Projected cost: $8,245,000.

I-185 from St. Mary's Road to Victory Drive- Description: Realignment of roadway to correct substandard curvature South of St. Mary's Interchange. A third lane will be added in each direction providing for a 6 lane facility. Projected cost: $15,600,000.

ATMS/Signal/CCTV/Fiber- Description: Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) that would monitor traffic conditions, to include the use of cameras, and variable message signs. ITS Center to be developed and housed in Government Center Annex. Projected cost: Engineering: $200,000, Construction: $3,407,000.

Veterans Parkway from Old Moon Road to Turnberry Lane- Description: Adding turn and decel lanes. Traffic signalization. Part of the larger Veterans Parkway project. Projected cost: $3,200,000.

Brown Avenue at Southern Railroad- Description: Bridge replacement. Projected cost: $3,000,000.

Whittlesey Road from Veterans Parkway to Bradley Park Drive- Description: Divided into two sections: Veterans to Whitesville, Whitesville to Bradley Park. Only Veterans to Whitesville is scheduled for construction. Four lane with median from Whitesville Road to Veterans Parkway. Projected cost: Construction: $6,000,000, Row (42): $1,120,000.

Moon Road from Wilbur Drive to Veterans Parkway- Description: Widen and reconstruct 2 lane road to 4 lanes. Consultants have been looking at alternative to widening this roadway. Projected cost: TBD.

Talbotton/Warm Springs Road from 7th Ave. to Woodruff Road- Description: Four lane divided with raised median. Projected cost: Row (142 parcels): $4,000,000, Construction: $10,300,000.

St. Mary's Road from Robin Road to Northstar Drive- Description: Widen 3 lane segment to 4 lanes. Includes sidewalks and landscaping. Projected cost: TBD.

Eastern Connector from US 80 to Buena Vista Road- Description: Construction of a 4 lane road for Muscogee Technology Park. Projected cost: Row (N/A), Construction: $23,700,000.

State Safety Projects:

Peacock/Brown Avenue Intersection Improvement- Description: Intersection Improvement. Projected cost: Row (parcels 25): $679,000, Construction: $587,000.

Locally Funded Projects

Whitesville/Williams Road- Description: Widening, signalization and turning lane improvements. Projected cost: $1,500,000.

Walking/Bicycle Trail- Description: Walking/Jogging trail from 14th Street bridge to Cooper Creek Park along the Warm Springs Road rail line. This is Phase I. Second phase will run from Cooper Creek Park to Psalmond Road and will be built as funds become available. Projected cost: Row: Own, Construction: $6,000,000.

Double Churches/Whitesville Road Intersection- Description: Widening, signalization and turning lane improvements. Projected cost: $1,500,000.

Standing Boy Bridge- Description: Replacement of existing bridge. Projected cost: Row(5): $200,000, Construction (SPLOST): $1,300,000.

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An "Intelligent Transportation System" will be installed on major roads in the Columbus area. The system will allow traffic engineers to retime traffic lights with just the touch of a few buttons. The new system will also include cameras at major intersections that will help traffic engineers monitor the flow of traffic and check for accidents. If something were to occur they could retime surrounding lights quickly so drivers can get to their destination without delay. Cameras could also monitor the interstate and message boards like those in Atlanta. This will help give drivers information about accidents and delays ahead. City leaders plan to begin installing the new traffic system later this year. The project will cost $3.4 million.

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This is mainly for the Columbus metro region, but the 4-laning of U.S. 280 from Opelika to Birmingham has been finished. This now gives Columbus/Auburn/Opelika/Birmingham residents a 4-lane highway to travel to and from these cities.

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Georgia DOT to resurface I-185:

Project extends from Williams Road to LaGrange

The Georgia Department of Transportation proposes to do more than $48 million worth of resurfacing and maintenance work on 30.32 miles of Interstate 185, from Williams Road in Columbus to U.S. 27 in Troup County. Construction on the I-185 project is planned for fiscal 2007, with the federal government investing $43.38 million and the state, $4.8 million.

U.S. 27 widening:

Continued widening of U.S. 27 from Columbus into Harris County also is proposed, with 6.26 miles planned from Turnberry Lane in Columbus to Gatlin Lane in Harris County. But construction is not planned until after fiscal 2009. Right of way acquisition, expected in fiscal 2008, is expected to cost nearly $18 million, with another $6 million in right of way costs after fiscal 2009. Construction is projected at $18.93 million and is not expected until about 2014

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GA DOT Approves St. Marys, Gentian Projects:

McMath-Turner Construction Co. of Columbus has been awarded a $5.51 million contract to widen one mile of St. Marys Road. The project begins at Buena Vista Road and extends east to Robin Drive. The road will be 5 lanes with a center turn lane. The project will be completed Dec. 31, 2007.

McMath-Turner also was awarded a $1.72 million contract to complete drainage improvements and remove railroad tracks and ballast on Gentian Boulevard in Columbus. The work begins at Ga. 85 and extends to Cougar Court. The work includes construction of a bridge culvert. Work is expected to be finished July 31, 2007.

Edited by ATLman1

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I-185 revamp in the works

I-185 Widening

its nice to see 185 south widening, but traffic flow there is pretty smooth i know with brac it will become more crazy and jammed, but while there is such talk about widening streets the city and state really need to take a look at J.R. Allen Parkway i'm getting sick of bieng caught in the traffic jams there in the morning and evening rush hours i know its a problem with living in a metropolitian area. but almost every friday evening there are traffic jams from summerville Road exit in Phenix City back to Bradley Park Drive and even 185 at times and vice versa in the morning.This does cause a ripple effect in traffic flows on 2nd Avenue with the downtown traffic And driving along 280 in Phenix City is a nightmare it reminds me of Rush hour back in Atlanta all lanes blocked in every direction moving at a slow crawl. These are just some of worse problem areas even though traffic throughout the City of Columbus/Phenix City is getting bad especially on streets like 13th street downtown near the bridge, Wynnton/Macon Roads, Buena Vista Road(nightmare to many subdivisions going up out there) Whitesville/Veterans, and Airport Thruway. North Veterans Parkway/Whittlesley Blvd we already know. Does anyone see this besides me?

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its nice to see 185 south widening, but traffic flow there is pretty smooth i know with brac it will become more crazy and jammed, but while there is such talk about widening streets the city and state really need to take a look at J.R. Allen Parkway i'm getting sick of bieng caught in the traffic jams there in the morning and evening rush hours i know its a problem with living in a metropolitian area. but almost every friday evening there are traffic jams from summerville Road exit in Phenix City back to Bradley Park Drive and even 185 at times and vice versa in the morning.This does cause a ripple effect in traffic flows on 2nd Avenue with the downtown traffic And driving along 280 in Phenix City is a nightmare it reminds me of Rush hour back in Atlanta all lanes blocked in every direction moving at a slow crawl. These are just some of worse problem areas even though traffic throughout the City of Columbus/Phenix City is getting bad especially on streets like 13th street downtown near the bridge, Wynnton/Macon Roads, Buena Vista Road(nightmare to many subdivisions going up out there) Whitesville/Veterans, and Airport Thruway. North Veterans Parkway/Whittlesley Blvd we already know. Does anyone see this besides me?

I am only down on weekends for now, so I cant comment on the work week -- but I have sure noticed a major pickup in traffic all around the areas I do frequent when I am there. The deadend intersection of Allen Pwy and 280 in PC is a nitemare -- not sure what is worse, getting onto 280 from Allen Pwy or getting on to Allen Pwy from 280. The whole Columbus X-ing area is a zoo -- but cannot be avoided when shopping. My pet peeve is the ridiculous left-turn only lights all along the Manchester X-pressway (wnat a misnomer -- hardly an X-pressway with all those lights). They take FOREVER and are mostlty unnecessary (like the one at 17th Ave and the one (35th St?) between 45th St and River Rd intersections). I dont know who the City traffic engineer is, but I believe that he got his degree from a correspondence school! The City really needs a competent traffic engineer and certainly better planning and MUCH better roads. Part of the "problem" is that GDOT seems to be committed to its stupid notion of funnelling all traffic thru Atlanta -- so funds are spent here and the other areas of the state get crumbs.

That said, I still have not encountered any situation that I can consider comparable to traffic here in Atlanta. I have driven in NYC, SF, LA, DC, Houston, Mexico City, etc. Atlanta is about as bad as any of them. But then I am subject to rush hour traffic conditions and, as I said, I dont have any firsthand experience with those conditions in Columbus -- yet.

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I am only down on weekends for now, so I cant comment on the work week -- but I have sure noticed a major pickup in traffic all around the areas I do frequent when I am there. The deadend intersection of Allen Pwy and 280 in PC is a nitemare -- not sure what is worse, getting onto 280 from Allen Pwy or getting on to Allen Pwy from 280. The whole Columbus X-ing area is a zoo -- but cannot be avoided when shopping. My pet peeve is the ridiculous left-turn only lights all along the Manchester X-pressway (wnat a misnomer -- hardly an X-pressway with all those lights). They take FOREVER and are mostlty unnecessary (like the one at 17th Ave and the one (35th St?) between 45th St and River Rd intersections). I dont know who the City traffic engineer is, but I believe that he got his degree from a correspondence school! The City really needs a competent traffic engineer and certainly better planning and MUCH better roads.

Agree

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I'm interested in pinning this topic to the top of this forum.

Anyone have any objections to this?

I have no objections.

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Anyone have a better sense than I do of what is actually happening with the Rails-To-Trails project. The info I read today left me a little confused. I knew that the project was originally billed as including a trolley line from DT to CSU and beyond. Then I heard that the line got scrapped because of cost. Now it seems that it may be back on track (pun intended) but with rubber-wheeled trolley rather than rails? And the project may be expanded to include Civic Center and the Convention Center?

Hope that that is correct on both counts. The trail really needs a trolley to facilitate traffic between CSU main and DT campuses. A rubber-wheeled trolley would be less expensive, more environmentally friendly and probably require less maintenance. The downside is that it would require a driver and there is always the possibility of human error. But rails are not infallible and derailments not unheard of. Also that type of rubber-tire trolley could presumably be run along the Riverwalk. With the new Riverwalk extension behind the E&P Condo, it could be possible to connect the Civic Center and the Convention Center to the trailhead at 14th St Bridge. Also using trolleys along Riverwalk might be a way to ferry whitewater users between putin point @ Bibb Mill and takeout point @ Dillingham St.

I recently walked the Riverwalk from River Club down to Dillingham and then up the PC Riverwalk to and across the 14th St Bridge. If and when that 14th St Bridge gets converted to a pedestrian plaza with cafes and outdoor bars, it will be a great addition to the DT area. Especially if the Phenixian and the Phenix Rising condos do get built.

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Project may ease Liberty District flooding

6th Avenue will be widened after storm, sanitary sewers are split

The project will improve the stormwater drainage system along 6th Avenue from the Chattahoochee River to 14th Street. In addition to 6th Avenue, improvements will be made to the drainage system along several side streets from 5th to 11th streets.

Development issue

Heavy rains in the Liberty District cause standing water and flooding in some of the buildings, which has hindered efforts to revitalize the area. The enlarged culvert will increase the capacity of the system to allow more water to drain faster.

Construction on phase I will begin within the next two months and will be completed within two years.

The estimated cost of the total project is about $39.47 million, and phase I will cost about $18.3 million. Phase I includes 6th Avenue from the river to 6th Street in addition to 5th and 6th streets.

Phase I is funded by the 1999 SPLOST and bond sales. Funds are not currently available for the remaining four phases, but Arrington said the city is searching for more money.

Road improvements

Besides improving drainage, the project will also widen 6th Avenue. When completed, the street will have four traffic lanes, two parking lanes and a grassy median. During phase I, construction crews will also shift the roadbed on Victory Drive to reduce the sharpness of the curve in front of Memorial Stadium.

Part of the Riverwalk immediately east and west of the Columbus Civic Center will be inaccessible during construction, but a permanent ramp will be erected on the far west side of the Civic Center to allow pedestrian access.

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DOT awards $69M in contracts for I-185

Columbus and Fortson firms win project bids

More than $69 million in improvements to Interstate 185 in Columbus are included in two contracts approved by the Georgia Department of Transportation.

Robinson Paving Co. of Columbus was awarded a $51.6 million contract to construct 2.8 miles of widening for additional lanes and roadway reconstruction on I-185 from the Victory Drive interchange north to St. Marys Road. The project includes construction of three bridges and approaches over Cusseta Road and the Georgia Southwestern railroad, and installation of an advanced traffic management system. The project is expected to be finished by Aug. 31, 2009.

Alexander Contracting Co. Inc., Fortson, was awarded a $17.6 million contract for 1.3 miles of interchange reconstruction of the I-185 interchange at Victory Drive. The project includes constructing two bridges and approaches over I-185. Completion is expected Oct. 31, 2009.

Robinson Paving also was awarded two contracts for bridge and road work in Harris County. The company was awarded a $3.8 million contract to complete 1.2 miles of drainage improvements and construction of two bridges and approaches on Ga. 116 crossing Bethlehem and Bethel creeks. The project includes realigning Ga. 116 Completion is expected Dec. 31, 2008.

Robinson Paving received a $483,803 state contract to build a bridge culvert replacement on Harris County Road 387 at Palmetto Creek. Completion is expected April 30, 2008.

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Marietta firm to repave I-185: Project will start from both ends nearly around the clock for over a year

Starting just after Labor Day, construction crews will begin resurfacing Interstate 185 by working night and day from both ends of the route, starting at Airport Thruway in Columbus and near I-85 in Troup County, according to the president of C.W. Matthews Contracting Co., Marietta.

"We'll actually be working 24/7, with two 10-hour shifts and four hours for maintenance," said Bill Hammack, the company president. "My goal is to finish the project before Thanksgiving next year."

After nearly three decades of use, 41.3 miles of I-185 from Airport Thruway to I-85 will be resurfaced.

The Georgia Department of Transportation late Wednesday awarded a $75.52 million contract to resurface and provide other maintenance to the four-lane highway, DOT Assistant Communications Director Dave Spear said Thursday. Matthews was the lower of two bidders by $4.3 million.

"We're excited about the project. There's no question the heaviest traffic will be in Columbus," said Hammack, noting that lanes will have to close at times. But he said the company will work to keep congestion to a minimum.

"We will be working with Robinson Paving Co. of Columbus as a subcontractor on the south end," Hammack said. "This is a fast-track project."

Matthews also has the contract to build the I-85 interchange project at the Kia automotive site near West Point, and Hammack said he expects to complete that project in December 2008.

Matthews has been in business since 1946 and Hammack has been with the company for 36 years.

Talbotton Road project:

Another key Columbus transportation project cleared another funding hurdle Wednesday when a $50.7 billion appropriations bill passed the U.S. House that includes $450,000 toward the cost of four-laning about two miles of Talbotton Road.

The 2008 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations bill will now go to a House-Senate conference committee to iron out differences between House and Senate bills. Once that is approved, it would go to the president for signing.

Columbus Director of Planning Rick Jones said the Talbotton Road project will be funded entirely by the state and federal governments.

"There's no local dollars. Sam Wellborn (State Transportation Board member from Columbus) worked it out for us," Jones said.

The stretch of Talbotton Road to be widened from two to four lanes begins at Seventh Avenue, near the junction of Hamilton and Talbotton roads, and extends 2.02 miles to Woodruff Road, Jones said.

The Georgia Department of Transportation has $22 million for rights-of-way acquisition on the project, DOT Assistant Director of Communications Dave Spear said Thursday. About 140 parcels must be acquired. That could take about two years. He said DOT officials will contact property owners directly to discuss the project.

Spear estimates construction cost at $12 million, and said construction should begin in 2009-10 and be completed by the end of 2012. Because this is a programmed project, he said the funds are expected to be available. Funding for such projects is usually 80 percent federal, 20 percent state.

State environmental work is expected to be completed in September or October. Then it goes to the Federal Highway Administration for environmental. Right of way acquisition should begin next year.

Second District U.S. Rep. Sanford Bishop, who voted for the bill, said, "The investments made in our infrastructure by this bill reflect the potential for our region's economic expansion and growth. For example, Talbotton Road is one of Columbus' major thoroughfares. Widening the road will undoubtedly better serve people going to (area) locations, but also be an incentive to businesses looking to come to the area."

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Updated Road Construction List:

Road:

1) I-185 - Victory Drive to St. Mary's Road: Widen from 4 to 6 lanes (construction begins Summer 2007).

2) I-185 - Victory Drive Interchange: Interchange Improvements (bridges, etc.) (construction begins Summer 2007).

3) Brown Avenue & Peacock Avenue: Intersection Improvements (construction begins Summer 2007).

4) Talbotton/Warm Springs Road: Widen from 2 to 4 lanes (construction to begin in 2010).

5) Brown Avenue Bridge @ Southern Railroad: Bridge Improvement (construction to begin in 2009).

6) Veterans Pkwy - Old Moon to Turnberry: Widen from 2 to 4 lanes (construction to begin in 2009).

7) Whittlesey Road - Veterans to Whitesville: Widen from 2 to 4 lanes (construction to begin in 2009).

8) Schatulga Road/Eastern Connector from Chattsworth Road to Macon Road: Widen & Construct Road (construction to begin in 2009).

9) Moon Road @ Whittlesey Blvd: Intersection Improvement (construction begins Summer 2007).

10) Schomburg Road between North & South Stadium Drive: Finished this summer

11) Whitesville Road @ Double Churches Road: Intersection Improvement (construction begins in 2008).

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I've always heard this and always wondered how much truth there was too it...

That the Callaways and Bradleys kept the Interstate out of Columbus originally. You can certainly see that one of the originally proposed plans in 1944 had Columbus, Albany and Dothan, AL.

intreg6.jpg

Just wondering if anyone in the www had ever heard or come across anything on that.

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Update on Moon Road Widening:

Group prefers making Moon Road four lanes

City planners say adding two lanes over 1 1/2 miles to cost $7.1 million

City planners Tuesday recommended a cure for traffic that routinely clogs Moon Road -- two more lanes but hold the median.

Columbus Planning Director Rick Jones told Mayor Jim Wetherington and Columbus Council that his department favors expanding the busy road to four lanes, stopping short of adding a raised median that could delay construction for years and require taking out some homes.

The expansion, about 1 1/2 miles, would start at Wilbur Drive and end at Whittlesey Boulevard.

That plan and others were presented at a July 26 open house at North Highland Assembly of God Church, where the public heard from city staff and consultants on the proposals and filled out surveys about what they preferred.

With 39 favorable responses, the four-lane, no-median option narrowly beat concepts that either would widen the road to three lanes, or to four lanes with a raised median.

Thirty-five respondents opted for the three-lane concept, and 34 people favored four lanes with a median.

Some residents who live on or near Moon Road complained at the public meeting about traffic buildups during morning and afternoon rush hour, agreeing that something must be done to alleviate congestion.

An average of 13,400 cars travel daily along the stretch of Moon Road slated to be widened, which has a capacity of 16,600.

In explaining the Planning Department's recommendation, Jones said the four-lane option -- billed as option No. 3 at the public meeting -- would ease congestion and extend the road's capacity for approximately 20 years, taking only small amounts of additional right of way.

Although adding the raised median would likely make the road safer, it would require some homes be bought. And some residents were put off at the idea of not being able to make a left turn into and out of neighborhoods, Jones said.

"We think we can leave the neighborhood intact for all practical purposes and still accomplish what we're trying to accomplish out there," Jones said.

Adding two lanes would cost an estimated $7.1 million, which the city would have to cover. Jones predicted that the project could be complete within three to five years.

City Manager Isaiah Hugley said the city is exploring funding sources for road projects, such as Moon Road, and that some ideas will be taken to council in the next couple of weeks.

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5 blocks, 100 trees and $1 million

553-1009_MidtownPlanted500.embedded.prod_affiliate.70.jpg

Walk Wynnton Road on a sunny day and you may have to stop at the Rite Aid or Walgreen's for some sunscreen. There's little shade beyond the shadows of signs planted on the roadside.

MidTown Inc. wants to plant something else along that corridor, from the intersection at Peacock and Brown avenues east to Hilton Avenue and Tate Drive:

Trees.

Trees along the curb. Trees in the triangles at Forest Avenue and Hilton Avenue. Trees in the road where a painted median now runs from Forest Avenue to Cedar Avenue, between Davis Broadcasting and the Wynnton Building that architect Dave Froelich plans to give a face-lift.

The face-lift MidTown Inc. wants to give Wynnton Road would be a relative forest: More than 100 trees would be set out as new sidewalks are put in and utilities are buried underground, instead of hanging overhead. Overhead would be new street lights on black aluminum poles. Also in the redesign are two-toned, textured, brick-stamped crosswalks.

All this would be funded by a state transportation enhancement grant of about $800,000, to which MidTown would add about $200,000. If all goes well, the million-dollar makeover could be finished in just a few years.

The first stage

Tomlinson said improving this stretch of Wynnton Road is just the first stage of a long-range improvement plan, with more to come as more money becomes available. MidTown's north-south borders are Talbotton Road and Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. Its east-west boundaries are Interstate 185 and 10th Avenue, so this road called either Wynnton or Macon slices right through MidTown's middle.

The anchor

This streetscapes makeover will be anchored by an intersection realignment at Peacock and Brown Avenues. That's a separate state Department of Transportation project expected to cost $1.37 million, with the work to start any day now.

MidTown got engineers to modify that intersection design so it wouldn't leave so much barren pavement.

Tomlinson expects low-stature trees such as crepe myrtles to be planted in the median from Forest to Cedar Avenue. For the roadside, large canopy trees such as oaks are planned, not only to provide shade, but to grow so tall that they don't block business signs.

Edited by ATLman1

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New traffic light at intersection of Lee Rd 379 and 280 in Smiths Station has been turned on. As the metro-area continues to grow west and the gap between O-A and Columbus narrows, 280 will become less and less a highway and more and more a traffic snarled corridor.

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Columbus has been awarded three Transportation Enhancement grants totaling $1.85 million. The money will go toward streetscape/pedestrian improvements along Veterans Parkway, for Phase 1 of the Wynnton Road Master Plan and to improve the Lakebottom Park trail.

A $1 million grant will help improve the streetscape along Veterans Parkway; $797,840 is allocated for the master plan, which will include improved pedestrian facilities from Peacock to Hilton avenues; and $53,746 to improve the Lakebottom trail between 17th and Cherokee avenues.

Edited by ATLman1

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Traffic lights up but not activated at US80 (Allen Bypass) and GA85 (Manchester Expy) creating two new intersections. I wish the bypass limited-access had extended beyond this intersection and this intersection had been originally designed as a limited access instead of the way it is now - probably turning out to be another bottleneck.

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