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lammius

Hoboken Ferry Terminal (INSIDE LOOK!)

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Adjacent to the newly-restored Hoboken Train Station (a true gem of a building!) is the abandoned ferry terminal. Until the middle of the 20th century the terminal provided commuter and traveler access from the Erie-Lackawanna rail station to Manhattan. The space is HUGE and has laid unused for decades. There is a move afoot to restore the terminal and open it to retail, restaurant, and large events. An NJTRANSIT worker who took my class into the terminal said the large waiting room is one of the largest rooms in the world.

These photos were taken 11/11/2005

This sign, adjacent to the rail platforms, directs passengers to the ferry terminal (which is not open to the public).

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The large, vast, open space of the Terminal's main room.

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The ceiling is ornamented with stained glass. The glass was covered during World War 2 to hide the light from German pilots. The train station's ceiling glass has been restored, but in the ferry terminal the covering remains.

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Barlcay Street, anyone?

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One of the docks from which boats departed.

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The West Village in Manhattan is visible across the Hudson River.

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My class enjoying the expanse

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From the north end of the terminal, the Midtown skyline is visible

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This corridor brings us down from the Ferry Terminal to the Rail Platforms & Station

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Hope you enjoyed this behind-the-scenes look at Hoboken Ferry Terminal.

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I'm surprised this terminal wasn't pushed into service after September 11th when PATH was down.

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I'm surprised this terminal wasn't pushed into service after September 11th when PATH was down.

The terminal is in such horrible condition that it would take years to get it operating again. There are many wooden pilings that were used to guide the boats into the stalls that are damaged and should probably be replaced. Despite the clean look of the terminal there were some hazards that we had to avoid that would certainly have to be fixed before it could be opened to serve passengers. The immediate need for ferry service after 9/11 wouldn't allow time for the restoration of the terminal.

The train station waiting room, etc. were only re-opened in 2002 or 2003. The ferry terminal will hopefully see significant work begin within the next couple of years.

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Amazing, a truly unique piece of infrastructure from what was IMHO the greatest architectural period, ever. I'm sure they could pull together some sort of coalition to save that thing. If there is any such project let me know, I'd sure kick in a few bucks.

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Amazing, a truly unique piece of infrastructure from what was IMHO the greatest architectural period, ever. I'm sure they could pull together some sort of coalition to save that thing. If there is any such project let me know, I'd sure kick in a few bucks.

NJ TRANSIT and the Port Authority entered an agreement a couple years ago to assemble $125M for the restoration of the terminal. An engineering firm was hired to develop a design. I have no idea how soon we could expect to see work begin.

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More Pics!

I was flipping through my digital photo album and decided to add a few more pics of the Ferry Terminal.

Enjoy!

Some of these better show the depth of the space. It really is a very large room!

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Imagine retail storefronts on that left wall...

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From those big windows at the end you get...

Killer view of Midtown

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Killer view of Hoboken

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Cracks in the walls provide nice water views

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That's amazing! I wondered what the abandonment was on my trips to the area! Good to see they let people in for tours!

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