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UrbanAtl

Atlanta = a little NY, A little Miami and a little GA.

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I just wanted to know if others think that Atlanta is going the cultural route of being like New York but also a little like Miami.

Look at the way we dress; not as gray as New Yorkers and not as colorful and scantly clad as Miamians.

Look at our food; just as likely to eat bagels, salsa & grits all in a day's time (though not all together).

Look at our transit system; MARTA is nothing like the NY Subway but greater than Miami's rail efforts.

Atlanta is very different in our urban sprawl. We just don't have an ocean to stop us.

Does our architecture reflect our geography at all? We are more likely to build infill homes with large front porches meaning that we like being outdoors even when we are home. Atlanta's skyline has classic skyscrapers (IBM) like NY but more showy (Tower Place) like Miami's.

I was just wondering what you think.

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That seems like a good combo. I think ATL has a bit of every city mixed into it.

LA's highways

NY's regional status (NY-North, ATL-South)

Chicago's skyline (not as good, but impressive)

Detroit's tougness

help me with some more

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Ok. My point wasn't that Atlanta was unique in this. Other cities could also take ques from NY & Miami. I just wanted to know if it was a far fetched comparison.

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Ok. My point wasn't that Atlanta was unique in this. Other cities could also take ques from NY & Miami. I just wanted to know if it was a far fetched comparison.

I'm going to be honest here and answer "yes." It is a far-fetched comparison. The whole "New York of the South" comparison does nothing for Atlanta; aside from regional economics (which admittedly is a big "aside"), Atlanta has no more in common with New York than any regional cultural "capital." People continually push the "NYotS" idea, and all it does is hold up to scrunity Atlanta's total lack of pedestrian, street level involvement, of public transit utilization, of cultural interest, of density of experience, of implicit and explicit interactions among residents -- these are the things that make an urban environment and they are the exact things Atlanta, despite all its strong suits, is lacking. Again, contemporary Atlanta is a "leader" in developing both skyscrapers and corporations that are recognizable from a distance; however, this is not what makes a vibrant city. Until Atlanta learns this lesson such claims to the upper echelon of U.S. and international cities will continue to be totally misguided.

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Atlanta was nicknamed "The New York of the South" because it has the dominant skyline of the true, deep south. It's the only thing we have that compares, even somewhat, with New York. Miami is quickly getting there, but most people don't consider south Florida as part of the "south".

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What you really meant was the large homo scene, like in San Fan

Well, I've also noticed a lot of people who are into opposite-sex relationships living pretty Bohemian lifestyles. Personally, I have no problem with that, although I don't know why they have to go around acting "straight" in public. You can hardly go anywhere in this town without seeing people overtly flaunting their sexual attraction to members of the opposite sex.

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Well, I've also noticed a lot of people who are into opposite-sex relationships living pretty Bohemian lifestyles. Personally, I have no problem with that, although I don't know why they have to go around acting "straight" in public. You can hardly go anywhere in this town without seeing people overtly flaunting their sexual attraction to members of the opposite sex.

Huh??

That makes no sense. I believe thats what heterosexual people do, as in they appear to "act straight".

Anyways, I really hope nobody replies to this post as it will ruin the thread.

Thank you and goodnight.

Be sure to tip your waitress.

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Well, I've also noticed a lot of people who are into opposite-sex relationships living pretty Bohemian lifestyles. Personally, I have no problem with that, although I don't know why they have to go around acting "straight" in public. You can hardly go anywhere in this town without seeing people overtly flaunting their sexual attraction to members of the opposite sex.

It's disgusting!! Have you been to Midtown recently? Straighties EVERYWHERE! There goes the neighborhood.

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I believe thats what heterosexual people do, as in they appear to "act straight".

Yep, you see these opposite-sex types all over town these days. Like I say, I personally have no problem with people choosing that lifestyle but why must heterosexuals flaunt their sexuality in public?

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Yep, you see these opposite-sex types all over town these days. Like I say, I personally have no problem with people choosing that lifestyle but why must heterosexuals flaunt their sexuality in public?

OK now I understand your point.

Maybe they're insecure so they need to reassure themselves and everyone else that they are not gay. Or maybe our society has lost its bearings on sexual roles and behavior. But its not just heteros. I've seen homos do this too. I think its just people who are lost.

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I don't think you get it. I think they're just making fun of the way conservatives talk about Gay people and reversing it.

Your comment about Atlanta having a large "homo" scene was kind of bordering on offensive by the way

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I don't think you get it. I think they're just making fun of the way conservatives talk about Gay people and reversing it.

Your comment about Atlanta having a large "homo" scene was kind of bordering on offensive by the way

Listen here, "hetero" (I'm assuming you're heterosexual by the way), you need to lighten up.

The word "homo" is another way of saying "homosexual", only its shorter and rolls off the tongue better. Next time would you prefer the word "homosexual"? Is that somehow less offensive? Has the word "homo" picked up a negative connotation since the last time I checked? If I wanted to be nasty I could get nasty. But that would be stupid, mean and hateful. Lets get rid of the B.S. political correctness. I said nothing degrading or derrogatory. I used an abridged version of "homosexual". Would I be offended if a "homo" person called me a "hetero"? No. Ha! thats kinda funny, but no.

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According to Merriam-Webster.com, the definition of bohemian (in the sense that we are using it) is:

[definiton]2.

------------------

b : a person (as a writer or an artist) living an unconventional life usually in a colony with others

http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/bohemian

It mentions nothing of homosexuality and I see no real reason to bring it into this thread by the means it was brought up. Atlanta has a large gay population whether you agree with homosexuality or not. Atlanta also has a very large bohemian/artistic population. This is true and there's no reason to bring ethnic, racial, political, or homophobic slurs into this.

Besides, it is a little known fact, but there is a significant group of gay republicans out there (Log Cabin). This means that conservatives or those that lean conservative are not all straight or anti-gay.

I hope we can return back to our previously scheduled thread ;)

Now, I believe that Atlanta was given the title "New York of the South" not because it was as powerful or urban as New York (we're leagues behind them in both), but because, at the time the city came up with the title, Atlanta was the dominant city of the South much as New York is the dominant city of the North (and the entire nation, for that matter). In many cases, Atlanta had things (like some department stores) that could be found nowhere else in the South, much as New York has one of almost everything in it's region.

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Listen here, "hetero" (I'm assuming you're heterosexual by the way), you need to lighten up.

The word "homo" is another way of saying "homosexual", only its shorter and rolls off the tongue better. Next time would you prefer the word "homosexual"? Is that somehow less offensive? Has the word "homo" picked up a negative connotation since the last time I checked? If I wanted to be nasty I could get nasty. But that would be stupid, mean and hateful. Lets get rid of the B.S. political correctness. I said nothing degrading or derrogatory. I used an abridged version of "homosexual". Would I be offended if a "homo" person called me a "hetero"? No. Ha! thats kinda funny, but no.

And the word "Negro" is just a translation of "black," but one is now patently offensive to use and one is accepted. And I'd venture that that other word starting with an "n" was itself derived from "Negro" but that certainly doesn't make it okay by some algebraic rule. It doesn't matter how terms are derived, they acquire political implications through usage. I don't think that "homo" is considered polite, especially in the tone you used it.

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And the word "Negro" is just a translation of "black,"...... It doesn't matter how terms are derived, they acquire political implications through usage.

Err, "negro" is not a translation of "black"...it's derived from "negroid".

Dare I wade into this mess?

Some advice, dixie cup. Stop worrying (or thinking) about "political implications". If something offends you, relax! Move on with your life.

Good lord people! Every person I've ever met that's allowed their happiness, or their daily activities to be impacted, no matter how small, by "poilitical implications", on balance, tends to be full of self-loathing. This goes for both side of the political spectrum.

I think it's good to be offended once in awhile. It's even better to not dwell on it.

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Err, "negro" is not a translation of "black"...it's derived from "negroid".

Dare I wade into this mess?

Some advice, dixie cup. Stop worrying (or thinking) about "political implications". If something offends you, relax! Move on with your life.

Good lord people! Every person I've ever met that's allowed their happiness, or their daily activities to be impacted, no matter how small, by "poilitical implications", on balance, tends to be full of self-loathing. This goes for both side of the political spectrum.

I think it's good to be offended once in awhile. It's even better to not dwell on it.

I don't think it's self-loathing to recognize the implications of culturally charged words. I also don't agree with dismissing someone's reactions to those words by telling them to "relax" and forget about it.

Let's say your kid turns out to be gay. Is it cool with you if I ask, "Gee, what made him a homo?"

Or say he's straight but lives a slightly Bohemian life. Is it cool with you if I say, "What you really mean is he's part of the big homo scene, like in San Francisco."

Or let's say your wife or your kids have dark skin and I comment, "They look like Negros."

Suppose you grew up in a rural area and I say, "No wonder he voted for Bush, he's a redneck."

If you object to comments like that, is it also fine with you if I dismiss your objections and say, "Relax, they're just words. Stop worrying about 'political implications' in everything and get on with your life! It's good to be offended. Every person I've ever met like you tends to be filled with self-loathing anyway."

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I don't think it's self-loathing to recognize the implications of culturally charged words. I also don't agree with dismissing someone's reactions to those words by telling them to "relax" and forget about it.

Let's say your kid turns out to be gay. Is it cool with you if I ask, "Gee, what made him a homo?"

Or say he's straight but lives a slightly Bohemian life. Is it cool with you if I say, "What you really mean is he's part of the big homo scene, like in San Francisco."

Or let's say your wife or your kids have dark skin and I comment, "They look like Negros."

Suppose you grew up in a rural area and I say, "No wonder he voted for Bush, he's a redneck."

If you object to comments like that, is it also fine with you if I dismiss your objections and say, "Relax, they're just words. Stop worrying about 'political implications' in everything and get on with your life! It's good to be offended. Every person I've ever met like you tends to be filled with self-loathing anyway."

Nice spin job, but I don't object. You see, not only would I not dwell on your comments, I'd simply dismiss you as an idiot...and move on with the rest of my day/week/life, not phased one bit.

Maybe I have thicker skin than most, I dunno.... ;)

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Ok, I just handed out two suspensions on this one. One rather long one because it is not the first time that I have had to deal with this individual. Calling people idiots, ######s, homos, etc etc, goes against our rules and you guys ought to know better. I am perfectly fine with people discussing the merits of if Atlanta is a NY or capital of the South, but I am not fine with the characgterizations of groups of people that have taken place so far in just a short number of posts. Please get back on topic.

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... I'd simply dismiss you as an idiot...

Hm, despite your claim to have a thick skin it sounds like you have a remarkably thin one. Don't know if you are still reading but why is it "spin" to say literally the exact same things to you that you advocate saying to others? Maybe some folks are just hypersensitive, or perhaps they feel like they are in a special position.

With regard to any city's potential to become great, I think the key factors are its openness to change and how it deals with diversity. People come to cities because they believe there is a possibility to better themselves, and to live their dreams.

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