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BarGal

Photographic Equipment

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How many megapixals? What would you recommend a budding architecture photographer buy? Do you prefer 35mm or digital? I'm just curious what others are using to take these fabulous photos posted in the forums.

Thanks for sharing any advice or tips.

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While I can still understand the need for 35mm film, I would recommend that you go with digital. It is so much more flexable than film, you have immediate access to your photos, and it is a lot less expensive in the long run.

If you are going into this for business reasons, I would recommend a DSLR of at least 6M pixels, and then invest in high quality lenses. Expensive at first, but you can use the lenses on new camera bodies if you decide to upgrade.

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I currently own a Nikon D100 DSLR. It isn't the latest and greatest model. The D100 was replaced by the D200 in December of 2005. When I first bought the camera body I also bought a couple of additional lenses. The camera body itself cost me roughly $1k and I only spent around $300 for two lenses. I recently bought a fixed lens but a very high quality one with a large aperture (f1.8). My cheaper lenses are f2.8 and f5.6.

It really depends on what you'll be taking pictures of and if you want to use a tripod or not, but moral of the story is that I figured out by trial and error that it is best to get a decent dSLR body and great lenses. Lenses make the camera. In fact, some very high end camera bodies that are heavily used by wedding photographers are still only 4 megapixels.

The Nikon D100 I use is a 6 megapixel body and has been a great camera. I doubt I'll get another body until Nikon comes out with a full-frame version at a reasonable price. You could probably pick up a D100 body off of eBay fairly cheap now as the D200 has garnered everyone's attention and many are selling their D100's to get a D200 (which I believe is around $1700).

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Neo's post hit the bull's eye. Nikon D100 is the digital version of the F100, which has been a mainstay in the photog industry. It is the baseline in professional cameras, and offers a wide range of shooting abilities, including fantastic action photos, such as sports. :shades:

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I currently use an Olympus C740 Ultra Zoom mini Digital SLR. It's been a trusty little camera; however, I've realized that I'm rather passionate about photography, so I've been evaluating the Digital SLR's lately and have been impressed by both the Nikon D-series and the Canon Digital Rebel XT.

The thing that has really gotten my attention recently is that Nikon dropped the Suggested Retail Price of their D50 by $100.

You can pick up a D50 body and choose from among the various lenses separately or you can chooise from two different D50 Kits: 1) D50 + 18mm-55mm lense 2) D50 + 18mm-55mm lense + 55mm-200mm lense. To me, this value can't be beat for the budding photograher at the moment unless you're planning on making phtography a career. If you're going to get into it more seriously, then I would definitely go with what Neo and Skyliner suggested. The D100/D200 or the Canon Digital Rebel XT would be excellent low-end professional Digital SLRs.

If cost is a concern for you as it is for me, you can shop for the best price on these cameras and their available lenses at some site like MySimon.

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Thanks for all your suggestions and advice.

I've been swamped lately, but did get some time to do some research on digital SLRs.

I don't think I'm ready for the class of camera that you folks are using. I've never used anything other than a point and shoot type of camera. I've never even used a 35mm camera, so I'm not familar with the different lenses. So I don't think I'm ready for such an expensive option yet. I'm afraid I'd spent all that money on the camera, lenses and equipment then get frustrated by the technicalities of it all and not ever use it...though I do admit, I've always been intrigued by all that...and when my life settles down maybe I'll have time to take a photography class.

I did find a camera I wanted to run past you guys to see what you think of it or if you've heard anything good or bad about it.

I did some searching on the web and found the Fujifilm FinePix S9000. It's a 9.24 Megapixel, 10.7x Optical/2x Digital Zoom Digital Camera. I saw it out there for as low as $380. I'm kinda leaning towards this one. (And it wouldn't take me as long to save up my mad money to buy it.)

My objective is to take better quality pics for work, pursue photography more as a hobby and yes maybe get paid for a photo here and there someday.

So if you wouldn't mind I'd like to hear your expert opinion on the Fuji S9000.

Thanks!

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It's very similar to the Olympus C-740 Ultra Zoom that I have now (only higher resolution (i.e. more megapixels)). It's likely very fine for what your intended use is. However, if you get serious about this as a hobby and you want to do more later, like me, you'll be kicking yourself for shelling out the $400 on this camera when you coulda shelled out just a little more for something more serious. That's where I'm at now, at least ... kicking myself and loving every minute of the photos I'm taking with the other one. At least this way my wife and kids get to inherit a pretty cool little camera. :thumbsup:

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As far as standard and digital point-and-shoot cameras go, I've had better results from Olympus. Better color and shot settings in most cases.

That sounds like a great price for such a high resolution. I wonder what its weaknesses are?

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As far as point in shoot cameras go, I've heard good things about Olympus. But I still think I've heard more good things about Canon and Nikon, even in their point and shoot cameras. I admit I'm a Canon man myself, but the others mentioned aren't bad either.

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