Matthew

"The Block" revitalization back on the table

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I believe that the Del Cardo building is being preserved and renovated in full. That's a cool building, IMO one of the coolest in all of downtown. The progress photos seem to indicate that is still the plan.

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After lots and lots of trips to Asheville over the years I only found "the block" like two years ago. Glad the Del Cardo building is staying. Without it's character (generally speaking), Asheville isn't the same. 

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Construction on Eagle Market Place is stopped due to a crack that has developed in one of the concrete slabs. The article mentions that the soil there won't support a conventional foundation so they had to use "micro piles" instead. The article spins this as "Not a problem" and that the foundation is fine. Forgive my ignorance, but how does this sort of thing happen without subsidence in the foundation? I wonder if there's a chance that soil instability could doom this project?

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Fixing this will cost millions and I am worried that this will wind up killing the project or somehow falling on the city to fill some cost gap. In reality, the responsibility should belong 100% to either the engineers who designed it if their specifications are to blame, or the contractor building it if they botched the post tensioning.

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Construction on Eagle Market Place is stopped due to a crack that has developed in one of the concrete slabs. The article mentions that the soil there won't support a conventional foundation so they had to use "micro piles" instead. The article spins this as "Not a problem" and that the foundation is fine. Forgive my ignorance, but how does this sort of thing happen without subsidence in the foundation? I wonder if there's a chance that soil instability could doom this project?

I am not a practicing civil or materials engineer (but had classes back in the day), and from what I've seen its either the concrete itself (it typically gets tested *after it's poured) or the spacing between supports (either columns or the rebar inside the pour) was either calculated incorrectly or the contractor put either of those in incorrectly. This may not have presented itself until tension was applied but at the end of the day I think at least the PE's are glad it happened before construction workers or people were living above the failed plain. 

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