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sax184

Why planning/development is so bad in Raleigh

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So there aren't 15-20 retired/flexible schedule people in Raleigh, a city of over 200,000, that could show up at planning meetings to offer counterpoint to the sprawl lobby?

I'm pessimistic on a lot of growth stuff in this area, but no, I'm not that pessimistic.

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When I read this BTB blog last night, it almost made me sick. So once again, THAT is part of the reason why our planning stinks. The PC should immediately deny the site plan, and Baker should resign. The neighboring property owners should sue those beotchs for all they're worth. Can we please get some public servants that actually give a damn and have some ethical standards in there?

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Why didn't the developers put the landscaping buffer on their own property?

Having a "plan" to tell neighbors what they need to do with their own land is bad enough.

But forging signatures saying they gave the ok? Wow. If the Mezzalunas didn't catch this, what happens when the buffer needed to be built, and they are shown their "acceptance" of the proposal?

Having the chair of the planning board shrug off forgery as a technicality is beyond pathetic. "We don't have all the information yet?" The request was FORGED. That's all the information you need. Is this how the future of the area will be shaped for years to come? What about the rest of the PC, other than Chambliss? They didn't even give a second to the motion rejection motion. Their silence is their way of saying "we're going to let this one go."

Obviously there aren't any retired people who want to keep development in check here. If they were, they'd be there jumping up and down.

How does this even remotely pass for "impartial reporting" from the N&O story about the case

It looks like a fast-growing section of North Raleigh will get a new shopping center the city already approved once -- as soon as the regrettable matter of a forged real-estate document gets worked out.

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Then there is "The bad news is that every single person in the room was white" yet there are no plans to rectify this. So is it a problem, or isn't it?

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Wow....that was an unf$5king believable commission meeting.....Baker needs to meet the same fate as Black, Nifong and Phipps....everyone understands that the developer wants to shift the landscape requirements to adjacent properties in order to expand his buildable envelope right? This can easily be connected to school overcrowding via the out-of-control and over influential development industry and teh N&O should be able to run with it....

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City of 200,000? Yeah in 1987. Try a city of 350,000. If you want to add the ETJ it's 380,000. Raleigh is fairly large. You're absolutely right though, so far as the planning meetings.

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ExtraTerritorial Jurisdiction... basically the are in which a municipality has planning/zoning authority--the ultimate buildout of the city extends to it's ETJ. This web link shows Raleigh's ETJ area.

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ExtraTerritorial Jurisdiction... basically the are in which a municipality has planning/zoning authority--the ultimate buildout of the city extends to it's ETJ. This web link shows Raleigh's ETJ area.

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The BIG problem is that all of the decision makers are ancient. They are outdated, plain and simple. It's hard for them to truly visualize the current problems that Raleigh has, let alone have a vision for the future. The second biggest problem is that they continue to see Raleigh as a small southern city. They have no concept of how a modern city of 300,000+ people should operate. I see signs of this everywhere. Until we replace the old timers and infuse the city council and planning depts with new blood, we will continue to discuss these issues.

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I've never thought the Five Points area houses were all that great; basically mill-worker housing.

Sometimes the choice comes down to this. More people want 5,000 square foot houses than the ITB supply allows. Would you rather have these people create new perimeter construction, thus creating more sprawl? It's no secret that Raleigh was underbuilt with good houses in the center core until the 70's. I'm just glad that people are wanting to live in that kind of density instead of wanting an acre of land for their 5K house. I think Duplin Rd. is a great example of this.

I would like to see people tear down 2 or 3 houses and put in 3-4 in some areas. If I had the money, I'd go in and try to buy the first 5-6 houses on Currituck from Lassiter Mill and put in townhouses. I think they'd be highly sought-after.

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I've never thought the Five Points area houses were all that great; basically mill-worker housing.

Sometimes the choice comes down to this. More people want 5,000 square foot houses than the ITB supply allows. Would you rather have these people create new perimeter construction, thus creating more sprawl? It's no secret that Raleigh was underbuilt with good houses in the center core until the 70's. I'm just glad that people are wanting to live in that kind of density instead of wanting an acre of land for their 5K house. I think Duplin Rd. is a great example of this.

I would like to see people tear down 2 or 3 houses and put in 3-4 in some areas. If I had the money, I'd go in and try to buy the first 5-6 houses on Currituck from Lassiter Mill and put in townhouses. I think they'd be highly sought-after.

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I guess I'm not opposed to infill on philosophical grounds...If it is done with respect for the historical and architectural context of the surrounding houses (or, in the case of this nondescript mill village, of the neighborhood in general). But when some tacky suburban builder builds one of those palladium windowed, faux sophisticated brick in front, siding in back monstrosities (a la the Extreme Home Makeover House), it really lights my fuse...

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