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Newnan

Infill in Atlanta

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teshadoh    0

Architecture should reflect the neighborhood / area is in.

Mixed uses - residential, office & retail

Affordable housing component, some ratio of housing available to lower or lower middle income

Within major corridors should be medium to high density - townhomes, apartment buildings & low rises

Pedestrian oriented, parking avialble in alley or interior parking deck - otherwise streetside parking

NOT GATED

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Andrea    0

Architecture should reflect the neighborhood / area is in.

Mixed uses - residential, office & retail

Affordable housing component, some ratio of housing available to lower or lower middle income

Within major corridors should be medium to high density - townhomes, apartment buildings & low rises

Pedestrian oriented, parking avialble in alley or interior parking deck - otherwise streetside parking

NOT GATED

I totally agree with Brad. I love alleys especially.

I'd also love to see a moratorium on high-rise buildings, at least until we fill up the vacant lots downtown.

I also think we've got to do things to make the city friendlier to families, and that includes major attention to schools and neighborhoods. Until that happens, families will continue to locate in the suburbs.

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UrbanAtl    0

I would like to see each NPU (Neighborhood Planning Unit) have its own architectural style and unique sidewalk & lamp post designs. This would allow neighborhoods like VaHi & Candler park to become more distinct from each other over time. They already have a different feel but more or less look the same. It would be kind of like taking the idea of the different neighborhood 'crest' that's on top of many street signs and running with it.

I know that this is asking too much to have unique sidewalk designs for each hood when we can't even get adequate sidewalks in the first place. But just imagine a Victorian lace-like pattern pressed in the cement for Inman Park, Cabbage green-white gears for Cabbage Town, Marble edging for Inman Park, Brick for VaHi, images of King & his speaches for Sweet Auburn,,, The options should be endless.

Brad & Catlike... I couldn't agree more with both of you.

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Hybrid0NE    2

I'd also love to see a moratorium on high-rise buildings, at least until we fill up the vacant lots downtown.

:stop: Andrea you have to remain in time-out for the remainder of the day. :silly:

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sanka    0

we have got to get rid of this Corb tower in the park model...tons of oppertunity for infill with mixed use/mixed income like teshadoh wrote. Peachtree really needs to take advantage of its, undeserved, prestige. More developments like the one (not sure what it is called) on Peachtree by Peachtree Battle on the other side of the creek. Or the one on Pharr Rd.

Peachtree could defenatly handle a street wall of 8 to 15 story buildings in the buckhead area down to midtown...a bit more past that where infill is appropriate.

The building have got to address the street though...no more driveways to the single use development...an NO gated communities. I saw a study once that showed they actually have more petty crimes (mostly auto theft) than ungated communities!

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Newnan_Eric    0

we have got to get rid of this Corb tower in the park model...tons of oppertunity for infill with mixed use/mixed income like teshadoh wrote. Peachtree really needs to take advantage of its, undeserved, prestige. More developments like the one (not sure what it is called) on Peachtree by Peachtree Battle on the other side of the creek. Or the one on Pharr Rd.

Peachtree could defenatly handle a street wall of 8 to 15 story buildings in the buckhead area down to midtown...a bit more past that where infill is appropriate.

The building have got to address the street though...no more driveways to the single use development...an NO gated communities. I saw a study once that showed they actually have more petty crimes (mostly auto theft) than ungated communities!

1. Le Corbusier is probably one of THE worst influences on Urban Architecture from the 20th Century. L'Habitation (spelling?) = Yuck!

2. Actually, I read that Gated communities have a lower rate of random crimes (crimes of opportunity, i.e. vandalism), but have the same rate of burgalries and the like. The gates discourage the random acts, but the gate codes are often so well known that planned crimes are undeterred.

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designspace    0

1. Le Corbusier is probably one of THE worst influences on Urban Architecture from the 20th Century. L'Habitation (spelling?) = Yuck!

Well to each his own, but I have to disagree with you on this one. His U.N. Secretariat in NYC is one of the most stunning buildings in the world! I do understand how L'Habitation could be open to interpretation, however, at least it was innovative...

Speaking of innovation, the lack of it is driving me crazy about a lot of the infill development I've seen in Atlanta. It seems they're building lots of things with some odd fusion between turn-of-the-century and post-modern. In my opinion, this stuff is actually quite boring. Some of it actually looks like a movie set, very fake. A few examples: Atlantic Station, Inman Park Village (I think that's the name), some random condos on Peachtree in So Buckhead, a shopping ("lifestyle?") center up in Dunwoody (around the Manhattan condo building), etc...

I would love to see some fresh, innovative, and I dare say, MODERN design reshaping Atlanta!

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teshadoh    0

Modernism is missing in Atlanta - which is a very conservative town. Though I do like Inman Park Village, I understand the general sameness that Atlantic Station has - though I otherwise support it. The problem is many developers feel pressure from historic neighborhoods in 'blending in', which they half heartedly copy a Victorian or Colonial style, which results in failure. But modern designs, which occur rarely - such as the (forgot the name) loft building south of North & Glen Iris, are sadly frowned upon. Otherwise what is built is uninspired modern design - remember the epidemic of curvatures in building designs 5 years ago? In particular on top of front entrances - in many cases was the only renovation of an older 80's era building.

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catlike    0

^^^

Sager Lofts? I looked at those with a friend. The design is rather unique. We need a few more well-placed designs like that.

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Newnan_Eric    0

Well to each his own, but I have to disagree with you on this one. His U.N. Secretariat in NYC is one of the most stunning buildings in the world! I do understand how L'Habitation could be open to interpretation, however, at least it was innovative...

Speaking of innovation, the lack of it is driving me crazy about a lot of the infill development I've seen in Atlanta. It seems they're building lots of things with some odd fusion between turn-of-the-century and post-modern. In my opinion, this stuff is actually quite boring. Some of it actually looks like a movie set, very fake. A few examples: Atlantic Station, Inman Park Village (I think that's the name), some random condos on Peachtree in So Buckhead, a shopping ("lifestyle?") center up in Dunwoody (around the Manhattan condo building), etc...

I would love to see some fresh, innovative, and I dare say, MODERN design reshaping Atlanta!

I will not debate the relative merits of the cosmetic appeal of Le Corbusier and other Moderist with you. Art (and by extension, Architecture) is subjective. However, Corbu's theories on housing for the masses are 180 degrees from what we have now figured out makes a vibrant, livable urban enviroment. These theories contributed to the populatity of the superblock housing tenaments that have been colossal failures as well as the "tower in the park" developments that have been roundly debased on this forum.

The other thing that I dislike about Corbu and his contemporaries, though indirectly, is the awful imitators that they inspired. A truly great Modernist building is one thing, but the Modernism movement gave an excuse for developers wanting to shave costs by removing ornamentation. At least with Traditional/Classical designs the pig wore lip-gloss and eye-shadow.

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teshadoh    0

^^^

Sager Lofts? I looked at those with a friend. The design is rather unique. We need a few more well-placed designs like that.

That's it

The other thing that I dislike about Corbu and his contemporaries, though indirectly, is the awful imitators that they inspired. A truly great Modernist building is one thing, but the Modernism movement gave an excuse for developers wanting to shave costs by removing ornamentation. At least with Traditional/Classical designs the pig wore lip-gloss and eye-shadow.

Sadly the same thing could be said of Frank Lloyd Wright.

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sanka    0

It is definatly the model of what Corb proposed that really kills a city...look at Brasilia in Brazil. Not designed by Corbusier, but obviously designed by his model. I have never been there but every picture I have seen has been one of large roads, large parking lots, large "tower in the park"...and guess what..no people!! Much like Atlanta (but much worse obviously)

anyway, I am not a huge fan of modern architecture. But I would much rather see a Frank Gehry jacked up design that added life to the street than the best Le Corb had to offer (at least through his urban design philosphy)

I can understand not likeing the sometimes fake looking developments, like Atlantic Station, but I love the street life on the site. Hopefully it will not become a giant outdoor mall. I think it will take 10 or 20 years for it to find its real identity.

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Lady Celeste    58

Something needs to be done with Piedmont in South Buckhead!

It's being transformed as we speak. The Lindbergh City Centre started it all. There is alot of midrise development going on.

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teshadoh    0

Redevelopment of the ex-KMart anchored shopping center into a faux new urbanist development. Plus two of the aging apartment complexes are being converted into condos, as one is already under construction. This is a happening area - as a lot of development is occuring further up Piedmont at Peachtree. The key is the corridor in between, while the vast majority of the 'grit' is mostly gone as renovations have transformed that stretch into a popular restaraunt corridor - major developments aren't likely to occur due to neighborhood opposition.

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teshadoh    0

Howell Mill is getting a massive shopping center at the site of Castlewood. Also there are a few new apartment complexes near Marietta St.

The only retail at Lindbergh City Center is a freaking Longhorns which isn't even built into the complex. This TOD has been a big dud.

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Newnan_Eric    0

The only retail at Lindbergh City Center is a freaking Longhorns which isn't even built into the complex. This TOD has been a big dud.

When I went by the Lindbergh development a while back, I was extremely disappointed. I had such high hopes for this place. I really thought that Bellsouth was being visionary with its plan to concentrate its offices are transit nodes, and I hoped that other major employers in the area would follow suit.

If this area doesn't come together and gain some momentum, it will be a discouragement for future TOD efforts. I realize that there is still more to come and it isn't finished yet, but right now it is underwhelming. The area just Norht of the Lindbergh City Center development looks like blight and is a real drag to the new pieces. I mean look at that former Shoney's - YCUK!

Hopefully when the Sembler development wraps up there will be a little more going on. No, its not the best urbanist design, but it's better than what used to be there and at least they give it a shot.

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socaguy    1

Howell Mill is getting a massive shopping center at the site of Castlewood. Also there are a few new apartment complexes near Marietta St.

The only retail at Lindbergh City Center is a freaking Longhorns which isn't even built into the complex. This TOD has been a big dud.

Is that the "urban Walmart" thing they are building on Howell Mill. I wonder how that will turn out?

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Andrea    0

When I went by the Lindbergh development a while back, I was extremely disappointed. I had such high hopes for this place. I really thought that Bellsouth was being visionary with its plan to concentrate its offices are transit nodes, and I hoped that other major employers in the area would follow suit.

If this area doesn't come together and gain some momentum, it will be a discouragement for future TOD efforts. I realize that there is still more to come and it isn't finished yet, but right now it is underwhelming. The area just Norht of the Lindbergh City Center development looks like blight and is a real drag to the new pieces. I mean look at that former Shoney's - YCUK!

Oh, I think there will be big changes over there. It's clearly a work in progress. I'm sure the intent was simply to let lease run out on the Shoney's and the Mexican place and redevelop the area, not to leave it as it is! The Beltline should have a significant impact there, since it also connects with a MARTA station. There are very large residential components planned and/or under construction, and that should make a big difference, too.

Edited to add: We usually don't say we are extremely disappointed by Midtown because there are still ratty looking asphalt parking lots and abandoned gas stations along Peachtree, or that Buckhead is underwhelming because the Disco Kroger is across the street from Terminus. These changes just take a while.

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