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downtown cliff

Mod Spain Architecture

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I thought some of the mod building fans on the site might like to see this Slate slide show:

http://www.slate.com/id/2137122/?nav=tap3

I wonder (aloud) if anything like this will ever spring forth here in the Music City. I guess the closest major building we have to approaching this level of inventiveness is the GEC. I like this wild stuff, as long as it accents and compliments its surrounding built environment.

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Thats pretty edgy stuff. I would say its a possibility for sure, and would actually say that Museum Plaza in Louisville would be something currently being proposed that comes fairly close to rivaling the edgyness of these structures.

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Some of this is pretty edgy stuff. I cant say I am a fan of a lot of the ultra modern stuff out there, but some of it is pretty neat. The use of color is really lacking in many buildings in this country and I love the color aspect of what has happened there. The new East Bank Art Project will change things a little downtown and maybe open some minds a little more including mine.

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For the most part I like this. I also welcome any developer to bring modernism to Nashville. Miami has some cool buildings that change color - wish we could get something ultra-cool and color changing for the West End / Broadway split.

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For the most part I like this. I also welcome any developer to bring modernism to Nashville. Miami has some cool buildings that change color - wish we could get something ultra-cool and color changing for the West End / Broadway split.

I completely agree. That west end/broadway split is one of the most valuable properties in the city IMO. It'd be so cool to get something truly different (and big) on that property. Oh well, I guess a foreign imports auto shop is just as good right?

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In my opinion there are far more modern/edgy/beautiful buildings in Spain than the Guggenheim. Look up photos of Valencia and Malaga to name a few. Those cities have all kinds of great futuristic architecture.

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I wouldn't mind seeing a little of this ultra modern architecture in Nashville, but not too much. I like a little variety to keep things interesting.

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In my opinion there are far more modern/edgy/beautiful buildings in Spain than the Guggenheim. Look up photos of Valencia and Malaga to name a few. Those cities have all kinds of great futuristic architecture.

Those cities along the Spain's eastern coast have many great structures thanks to Spain's own Santiago Calatrava who is infamous for his futuristic buildings and bridges.

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Those cities along the Spain's eastern coast have many great structures thanks to Spain's own Santiago Calatrava who is infamous for his futuristic buildings and bridges.

I have been to Calatrava's "City of Arts and Sciences" in Valencia, and I must confess it is full of several amazing structures. The whole outfit can certainly be described as "Contemporary" (the word Modern is far too loaded, thanks the to Bauhaus folks and their ilk, to be used to describe anything but Modernism Modernism like the Snodgrass Tower and stuff...that link provided above was quite misleading), from the snow-white fish-bone pavillions to the fake rock and astronomical ticket prices.

The only huge problem with the place, and most of Spain's "cutting-edge" architecture, is that it all adds up to make for horrible urbanism. Many of them are striking as "objects", but they make lousy neighbors and their contributions usually produce lousy streets, and even worse plazas. The City of Arts and Sciences, for example, is over-scaled to the point of incompetence...the architectural objects are all so spread apart that they place feels empty and overheated...especially with the Valencian sun beating down, and no shade to be found. The continuing (and inexplicable) resistance of contemporary, progressive architects to make humane PLACES, as well as awe-inspiring SPACES, will likely continue to produce failures in the forseeable future. The upcoming summer blockbuster Museum "Plaza" is a great example. Big. Bold. Shocking. Intimate? Beautiful? Human-scaled?

There are some basic principles to architecture and urban design--just like there are for writing music, storytelling, cooking, and parenting--that are so critical to the success of our "theater stages for human life" (which all architecture ultimately is), no amount of creative genius-ing will ever be able to replace their application.

I wish Calatrava had designed his "City of Arts and Sciences" more like a city, and less like a collection of sculptures playfully scattered in a Terrarium. It could have been great.

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I have been to Calatrava's "City of Arts and Sciences" in Valencia, and I must confess it is full of several amazing structures. The whole outfit can certainly be described as "Contemporary" (the word Modern is far too loaded, thanks the to Bauhaus folks and their ilk, to be used to describe anything but Modernism Modernism like the Snodgrass Tower and stuff...that link provided above was quite misleading), from the snow-white fish-bone pavillions to the fake rock and astronomical ticket prices.

The only huge problem with the place, and most of Spain's "cutting-edge" architecture, is that it all adds up to make for horrible urbanism. Many of them are striking as "objects", but they make lousy neighbors and their contributions usually produce lousy streets, and even worse plazas. The City of Arts and Sciences, for example, is over-scaled to the point of incompetence...the architectural objects are all so spread apart that they place feels empty and overheated...especially with the Valencian sun beating down, and no shade to be found. The continuing (and inexplicable) resistance of contemporary, progressive architects to make humane PLACES, as well as awe-inspiring SPACES, will likely continue to produce failures in the forseeable future. The upcoming summer blockbuster Museum "Plaza" is a great example. Big. Bold. Shocking. Intimate? Beautiful? Human-scaled?

There are some basic principles to architecture and urban design--just like there are for writing music, storytelling, cooking, and parenting--that are so critical to the success of our "theater stages for human life" (which all architecture ultimately is), no amount of creative genius-ing will ever be able to replace their application.

I wish Calatrava had designed his "City of Arts and Sciences" more like a city, and less like a collection of sculptures playfully scattered in a Terrarium. It could have been great.

Yes, yes, exactly! That's what I mean when I say I like these buildings/complexes as long as they complement their built environment. Couldn't agree more. BTW, let me go on record again to say I like the Snod, hate the Parkway Towers. Just MHO.

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This should not overshadow the fact that Barcelona is one of the greatest cities in world and offers some of the best examples of urban design. Anyone who has never been needs to visit.

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This should not overshadow the fact that Barcelona is one of the greatest cities in world and offers some of the best examples of urban design. Anyone who has never been needs to visit.

Barcelona? The City of Arts and Sciences is in Valencia. Barcelona is definitely sweet, and I doubt a mediocre project in an entirely different city could overshadow it. :rolleyes:

Valencia is sweet, too--one of the most overlooked, but AMAZING cities in Europe.

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