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Sparkie

Oakbrooke Fayetteville

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Just wondering if anyone has heard of the Oakbrooke subdivision off Rupple Rd. in Fayetteville? Looks like a reaction against the McMansions of Fayetteville.

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Just wondering if anyone has heard of the Oakbrooke subdivision off Rupple Rd. in Fayetteville? Looks like a reaction against the McMansions of Fayetteville.

I've heard of stuff going on over there but hadn't heard any names mentioned until now. Rupple Rd has a lot of activity going on around it. They are going to extend it and eventually have it be the major road for west Fayetteville like Hwy 265/Crossover is for east Fayetteville. I'll have to see if I can find out more about it now that I know the name.

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I've heard of stuff going on over there but hadn't heard any names mentioned until now. Rupple Rd has a lot of activity going on around it. They are going to extend it and eventually have it be the major road for west Fayetteville like Hwy 265/Crossover is for east Fayetteville. I'll have to see if I can find out more about it now that I know the name.

I remember reading about something called "Rupple Row", I think to be done by the Barber Group in an earlier thread or on a website. It was supposed to be wooden "Mission" style wooden frame homes.

Is this the same thing or something different?

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I remember reading about something called "Rupple Row", I think to be done by the Barber Group in an earlier thread or on a website. It was supposed to be wooden "Mission" style wooden frame homes.

Is this the same thing or something different?

I admit I haven't been able to keep all of these developments around Rupple straight myself but I believe that is a different development. This weekend maybe I need to take a drive over there and see if I can check out some of these developments myself. If I see anything interesting I'll take pics of course.

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I admit I haven't been able to keep all of these developments around Rupple straight myself but I believe that is a different development. This weekend maybe I need to take a drive over there and see if I can check out some of these developments myself. If I see anything interesting I'll take pics of course.

I saw it in an ad on the back of FAMILY magazine. It said Paradigm Development in Fayetteville. Traditional American Architecture. Homes starting in the 140's

The pictures of homes are all Craftsman style homes like were popular in the 1920's or so. Very nice. Not French country stuff or garage in the front homes.

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I saw it in an ad on the back of FAMILY magazine. It said Paradigm Development in Fayetteville. Traditional American Architecture. Homes starting in the 140's

The pictures of homes are all Craftsman style homes like were popular in the 1920's or so. Very nice. Not French country stuff or garage in the front homes.

That does seem to be a current trend lately in Fayetteville. Building houses in some of the older styles.

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That does seem to be a current trend lately in Fayetteville. Building houses in some of the older styles.

The older styles are trying to make a comeback and I think it's awesome. Ten years ago, if I would have presented a Craftsman-style home plan to a customer, they would have told me "no way." Today, I'm seeing more and more of this style popping up in many different areas.

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The older styles are trying to make a comeback and I think it's awesome. Ten years ago, if I would have presented a Craftsman-style home plan to a customer, they would have told me "no way." Today, I'm seeing more and more of this style popping up in many different areas.

Yeah now when is the Victorian/Queen Anne style going to come back? :lol:

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Here are some pictues of the Oakbrooke s/d: http://www.paradigmdevelopment.biz/oakbrooke.htm

It is just the same site that has the Park West Info and Pics, but it does show the style as well as the plat.

This s/d looks to connect from Rupple then heads west and butts up to the Bridgeport s/d. It does not look like it connects, but it does contain several stub streets for future development.

Other development in this area includes Rupple Row (south on Rupple Rd towards the Youth Center). It looks to contain hundreds of dwellings. Wellspring Community on the NE corner of Wedington and Rupple. I believe when completed will have over 1100 dwellings and 100's of thousands of sq ft of commercial. Chevaux Court Condos on Wedington and Salem. 58 condo/townhouses just finished within the last month.

The old Arkansas sports park has also been sold for development, but I have not heard what is going to happen there yet.

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Here are some pictues of the Oakbrooke s/d: http://www.paradigmdevelopment.biz/oakbrooke.htm

It is just the same site that has the Park West Info and Pics, but it does show the style as well as the plat.

This s/d looks to connect from Rupple then heads west and butts up to the Bridgeport s/d. It does not look like it connects, but it does contain several stub streets for future development.

Other development in this area includes Rupple Row (south on Rupple Rd towards the Youth Center). It looks to contain hundreds of dwellings. Wellspring Community on the NE corner of Wedington and Rupple. I believe when completed will have over 1100 dwellings and 100's of thousands of sq ft of commercial. Chevaux Court Condos on Wedington and Salem. 58 condo/townhouses just finished within the last month.

The old Arkansas sports park has also been sold for development, but I have not heard what is going to happen there yet.

Thanks for the info. :D

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supkof

Are you a builder or architect? What do you think about using historic styled homes? Do you like the craftsman style? Do you think homes should start being built in a contemporary style for 2006 instead of some style from the past?

I guess these questions are open to anybody. :)

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supkof

Are you a builder or architect? What do you think about using historic styled homes? Do you like the craftsman style? Do you think homes should start being built in a contemporary style for 2006 instead of some style from the past?

I guess these questions are open to anybody. :)

I love the look of bungalows and craftsman style homes. In the case of these two styles, I think the style itself is timeless but doesn't necessarily carry the weight of a period of history that would make its re-creation too faux to me.

Its kind of the "working man's" architecture in a way.

I love bungalows. They definitely fit with the Fayetteville vibe more than cookie cutter brick boxes.

The more the better.

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I love the look of bungalows and craftsman style homes. In the case of these two styles, I think the style itself is timeless but doesn't necessarily carry the weight of a period of history that would make its re-creation too faux to me.

Its kind of the "working man's" architecture in a way.

I love bungalows. They definitely fit with the Fayetteville vibe more than cookie cutter brick boxes.

The more the better.

Yeah I wouldn't say they're my favorite but I'm certainly glad to see more of them here. They will certainly fit in better than the usual houses that have been built in recent years.

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Yeah I wouldn't say they're my favorite but I'm certainly glad to see more of them here. They will certainly fit in better than the usual houses that have been built in recent years.

I think they will age better as well. One can usually spot a 70s or 80s home from a mile away because of the sameness of architecture, materials, etc.

One thing that is impressive is the huge greenspace area left in the middle of that plat. I'd consider living there.

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I think they will age better as well. One can usually spot a 70s or 80s home from a mile away because of the sameness of architecture, materials, etc.

One thing that is impressive is the huge greenspace area left in the middle of that plat. I'd consider living there.

Do you think the "historical architecture" phase is just a fad? Will Craftsman Style have a "sameness" that will give the same impression as the 70's and 80's (and i'd add 90's) homes?

Do you think the 70's and 80's stuff (as well as Craftsman) have a sertain look that causes people to really recognize them and like them or hate them over a long time?

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Do you think the "historical architecture" phase is just a fad? Will Craftsman Style have a "sameness" that will give the same impression as the 70's and 80's (and i'd add 90's) homes?

Do you think the 70's and 80's stuff (as well as Craftsman) have a sertain look that causes people to really recognize them and like them or hate them over a long time?

I don't think it will. First of all it is an older style and that makes it much more likely to be appreciated compared to newer architectural styles. In a sense it's already weathered the phase of it looking 'dated' if you know what I mean. There might be some people who don't particularly like that style or maybe some people that don't want the whole city to be made up of houses in that style. But I don't think too many people are going to be bothered by anything like this. I would think more people are going to appreciate this rather than more cookie cutter homes that are built so often in today's housing subdivisions.

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I don't think it will. First of all it is an older style and that makes it much more likely to be appreciated compared to newer architectural styles. In a sense it's already weathered the phase of it looking 'dated' if you know what I mean. There might be some people who don't particularly like that style or maybe some people that don't want the whole city to be made up of houses in that style. But I don't think too many people are going to be bothered by anything like this. I would think more people are going to appreciate this rather than more cookie cutter homes that are built so often in today's housing subdivisions.

I agree with you. I am excited to see how this project turns out. I drove up to B'ville the other day and took a turn thru a new subdivision that was supposed to be a "Craftsman" style development. It was regular snout-house looking homes and townhomes like anyother subdivision. The only thing "craftsman" was a tapered column on the small front porch. Very dissapointing.

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I absolutely LOVE this project. It will integrate well with the character of Fayetteville and in addition to being very stylish the architecture will be "timeless" instead of the dated architecture that is becoming common. I like what Mith said - "In a sense it's already weathered the phase of it looking 'dated' if you know what I mean." It also seems they are going to be very heterogenous making it seem more like 1920s-1930s neighborhoods like the Hillcrest and Heights in Little Rock and less cookie cutter like most modern developments in NWA and West LR. I'd love to see a similar project in Little Rock.

Even better are the prices, that's really very reasonable.

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Do you think the "historical architecture" phase is just a fad? Will Craftsman Style have a "sameness" that will give the same impression as the 70's and 80's (and i'd add 90's) homes?

Do you think the 70's and 80's stuff (as well as Craftsman) have a sertain look that causes people to really recognize them and like them or hate them over a long time?

I agree with Mith that these older styles (really this is 1910s=1930s) have weathered the "dated" look and have their own definitive charm and essentially like older Victorians will always be in demand. Neighborhoods in Dallas and Little Rock with this style of homes really are going at premium right now.

The problem with building homes with current trends is that ultimately in 20 years whole neighborhoods are going to look essentially the way we look at 1980s homes today (though at least we look back on these as being well-constructed compared to today's shoddy workmanship). In forty years the neighborhoods will really appear dated. This is just a way to bypass that and fit the character of the city. Not everyone will prefer to this to the current vogue but many will. I think buyers of projects like these will see that in 10-20 years they will get a better return on their investment than other homebuyers and that would be part of my motivation to buy a home in a project like this.

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I agree with Mith that these older styles (really this is 1910s=1930s) have weathered the "dated" look and have their own definitive charm and essentially like older Victorians will always be in demand. Neighborhoods in Dallas and Little Rock with this style of homes really are going at premium right now.

The problem with building homes with current trends is that ultimately in 20 years whole neighborhoods are going to look essentially the way we look at 1980s homes today (though at least we look back on these as being well-constructed compared to today's shoddy workmanship). In forty years the neighborhoods will really appear dated. This is just a way to bypass that and fit the character of the city. Not everyone will prefer to this to the current vogue but many will. I think buyers of projects like these will see that in 10-20 years they will get a better return on their investment than other homebuyers and that would be part of my motivation to buy a home in a project like this.

Yeah I'm sure not everyone will like these homes, but honestly I don't think there's going to be too many that won't. I really think these will be much more appealing than the usual style of homes you tend to see today. I'll certainly be interested in hearing more about this project as it develops.

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Yeah I'm sure not everyone will like these homes, but honestly I don't think there's going to be too many that won't. I really think these will be much more appealing than the usual style of homes you tend to see today. I'll certainly be interested in hearing more about this project as it develops.

Why are not more builders doing this sort of thing?

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Why are not more builders doing this sort of thing?

Honestly it's probably because it's easier just to go in and make all the cookie cutter houses on cheap land. Most people if you give them a choice between doing something the easy or hard way they'll pick the easy way. I do think Fayetteville and people here in the city need to send a sign to developers that we want something else in our city and not make it so easy for them to do something cheap that could become a problem or eyesore in the future.

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Why are not more builders doing this sort of thing?

1) It's not cost effective

2) The size of homes is increasing incredibly fast and these floor plans that were designed for smaller homes

3) Cookie-cutter materials are cheaper and easier to find, these homes will require a great deal of customization while building the standard homes you can find in Benton Co, Conway, Bryant, or Plano for that matter is very easy as most save the most expensive 20% come from cheap readily available stock materials.

4) Demand is questionable. While I would want these homes before most new ones and many others would, the majority of people want what's the current vogue. Furthermore, many people that want this style would prefer to just buy an older home in an established neighborhood, even at a premium.

I think this concept works well in places like Fayetteville and Hot Springs and part of LR that have a more stylish, artsier feel than other areas of the state. I don't think it would do well everywhere.

Brodie Creek was an interesting development in West LR consisting of fairly large, fairly expensive homes built in turn of the century San Francisco style with elegant streetscaping and a central park, pond, and gazebo. It wasn't a complete wash but people didn't want to pay the premium for those features and so though they sold the development didn't exactly take off like wildfire and later phases were greatly keyed down and cheapened. They are beautiful houses and I think they will retain their value much better than their contemporaries in surrounding neighborhoods that are the standard 1990s brick template homes common in West LR and NWA. Still, the developer would've been better off building cheaper, standard homes.

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