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eagle

How does a metropolitan area grow?

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eagle    0

I don't know much about city planning and growth so I guess this is newbee question.

How does the infrastructure (ie buildings, downtown area) grow from it's current size as a medium-sized city to that of a big city as it's population grows?

Let's assume for this example that someday GR becomes a city of >700,000 with a metro area of several million. (I don't know if that's even possible.) How does downtown grow to support that. Does the actual footprint stay about the same size but the buildings just get taller? We tear down current buildings and build taller ones? Or does the footprint get bigger? If that's the case, how? Our downtown is surrounded by houses to the east and west. To the south we have new, or refurbished developments (heartside, and possibly the mystery development. To the north we have the developments going in on north Monroe, some industry along Plainfield, and then houses. I certainly couldn't see anyone tearing down the west side neighborhood, or hertitage hill, to build skyscrapers. And I certainly don't think you'd destroy the developments on north monroe or heartside, which probably helped spur the growth, to build new skyscrapers. Hope that question makes since. Basically, how does a medium size city's downtown grow to support a large city's population?

Next question...

Many people believe that someday Grand Rapids, Holland, Muskegon, etc will just be one, large, city. How does this happen? Each city's core area is connected by hundreds of thousands of subdivisions? If GR's downtown is "land-locked" and each of these other city's downtowns are locked-in, how does the area grow to be one large city? Or, would it just be more like sister cities, surrounded by subdivisions, making up one large metropolitan area?

I look forward to your answers.

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MJLO    340

as a city grows, it's central core doesn't always. Take Phoenix, city is growing, the downtown. is a disgrace for the cities size. I think it really depends on how fast the city is growing. One thing I can say for sure, is that the foot print doesn't always stay the same. I gaurantee as the city grows, you will start seeing mid/high rises on the west side of the 131 freeway. We are already starting to get a glimpse that they may build them on the north side of the Ford.

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evac311    0

When you cruise downtown, you notice there is a TON of undeveloped or underutilized land. I think grdadof did a post a few months back. There was a comparison of city population vs downtown area.

This is interesting to me as well. I am curious to know the area of Chicago's downtown area and population, just to see how we stack up.

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GRDadof3    1826

Imagine 32nd Avenue in Georgetown Township being a 6 - 8 lane boulevard like Gratiot or Groesbeck in Detroit. That's what we have to look forward to. I don't see any other way. As someone else mentioned, suburban development can work its way through the pipeline so much faster than urban development.

Yes, downtown Grand Rapids will continue to densify, but not nearly as fast as suburban growth.

See Atlanta or Charlotte for examples. In fact, we got the South Beltline built WAY faster than Charlotte got the I-485 bypass built. They're still looking at 10 - 20 years down the road to completion.

That does not bode well for mitigating suburban sprawl.

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MJLO    340

property values are Jumping on that end of town too, the Kzoo corridor shot property values in Gaines way up. While property values in town are a little more stagnant, yet not declining. It would make sense that fiscally wise people, would want to put there money in something that would appreciate, and have a better option at selling. I bet if project X is as grand as people talk about, that Property values in Grand Rapids, and along Wyomings Lee st. Corridor, will grow at a much healthier rate.

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Rizzo    0

^Are you kidding, Jeff was saying property values in Grand Rapids' 'hoods are going up, not stagnant.

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GRDadof3    1826

^Are you kidding, Jeff was saying property values in Grand Rapids' 'hoods are going up, not stagnant.

Lighthousedave can verify this as well. Some areas around Madison Square have doubled in value in just 2 - 3 years. Of course, many depressed homes were only worth $50K - $70K, and are now at the median price range.

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blueman459    0

:rofl:

How does the city grow?

Drop a couple billion on a 30+ acre mixed use development in the dt core, add water and sunlight, check back in 10 years.

Hahahaha. For some reason that made me laugh out loud.. :rofl:

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Rizzo    0

Same here, and It shattered the windows in my house, woke up the guy next door that works 3rd shift, and annoyed the dog down the street.

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